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Full text of "Necrology, 1890-1900"

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MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY 



SECOND PRINTED SERIES, 



I 890- I 900, 



AS PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETINGS, BY THE SECRETARY OF 

THE ASSOCIATION. 




Andover Seminary Necrology, 1890-1900. 



ERRATA. 

1891, page 12. Dr. Newell studied with Rev. Henry White, D.D., 
instead of Rev. Henry Allen, D.D. 

1893, page 91. Mr. Butler was born July 21, 1837. 



1897, page 266. Mr. Emerson had twelve children ; four sons and 
five daughters were living in 1897. 



1900, page 387. Mr. Parsons died April 25, 1900. 

1900, page 438. Mr. Woodruff died at Perth Amboy, N. J. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1890-91 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE I Oth, 18 91, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, SECRETARY. 



Second Printed Series, Number I. 

? 



i 



BOSTON: 
Beacon Press : Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street, 

1891. 






.V 



ALUMNI COMMITTEE. 



Rev. Prof. George Harris, D.D. 
Rev. B. Frank Hamilton, D.D. 
Rev. Erastus Blakeslee. 
Rev. Edward S. Tead. 
Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Secretary. 



NOTICE. 



This Obituary Record is published annually in connection 
with the meeting of the Alumni Association at the June anni- 
versaries. Alumni are earnestly requested to aid in its prepara- 
tion by communicating the fact of the death of any past member 
of the Seminary, together with any newspaper notices or memorial 
sketches. These, with change of address, or other information 
relating to the record of living alumni, may be sent to the 
Secretary at Andover. 



INDEX. 



Class. Age. Page. 

1871. Benjamin S. Adams 54 30 

1855. Edward Aiken, M.D 60 27 

1845. Rowland Ayres, D.D 73 23 

1831. Thomas Bellows 82 10 

1831. *Daniel C. Blood 86 8 

1831. William T. Boutwell 87 8 

1837. Calvin Butler 80 15 

1824. Frederic E. Cannon, D.D 91 6 

1830. George B. Cheever, D.D 83 7 

1845. William Coffin 68 24 

1826. Paul Couch 87 6 

1831. *Edmund A. Crawley, D.D., D.C.L: 89 11 

1843. George F. Cushman, D.D 71 21 

1856. Samuel C. Dean 67 28 

1844. Henry M. Dexter, D.D., LL.D 69 21 

1831. Nathaniel S. Folsom, D.D 84 9 

1849. Edward H. Greeley, D.D 73 26 

1836. James B. Hadley 85 14 

181 5. Herman Halsey, D.D 97 5 

1842. Robert S. Hitchcock, D.D 73 19 

1834. *Samuel S. Howe 80 13 

1830. *John B. Kendall 88 8 

1834. Daniel Leach, D.D 84 13 

1886. *John A. Macdonald 40 30 

1856. Lyman Marshall 67 29 

1838. Burtis C. Megie, D.D. 76 16 

1844. Henry C. Morse 79 22 

1833. William W. Newell, D.D 83 12 

1864. Henry F. C. Nichols 57 29 

1842. Austin Phelps, D.D 70 20 

1844. Charles Richards 75 23 

1838. *James Rosamond 82 16 

1832. Joseph W. Sessions 88 12 

1838. Edward J. Stearns, D.D 80 17 

1836. Samuel S. Tappan 81 15 

1835. *John O. Taylor 82 14 

1831. Sewall Tenney, D.D m 88 10 

1846. Philip Titcomb 78 24 

1856. William R. Tompkins 65 28 

1847. *Charles N. Todd 75 25 

1839. *Charles W. Treadwell 72 18 

1851. Ransom B. Welch, D.D., LL.D 66 26 

1842. *William J. White 78 19 

1856. Oliver W. Winchester 64 28 

1848. Abel Wood 72 . 25 

1841. William W. Woodworth, D.D 76 18 

* Died before this year, but not before reported. 



$03 



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NECROLOGY 



GLASS 01 1815. 

Herman Halsey, D.D. 

Son of Dr. Stephen Halsey and Hamutal Howell; born in Bridgehampton, 
L. I., July 16, 1793; prepared for college under the instruction of his pastor, 
Rev. Aaron Woolworth, D. D. ; entered the sophomore class of Williams 
College, and graduated in 181 1. After beginning the study of medicine in 
Troy, N. Y., he decided to prepare for the ministry, and entered the Semi- 
nary in 181 2. He preached a few months in his native town, was ordained 
with Stephen Mason, his classmate, at Bethlehem, Conn., May 15, 1816, and 
with him entered the home missionary service of the Connecticut Missionary 
Society; "after a journey of thirty days, they arrived safely in Kentucky," 
laboring one year in the northern counties of that State. He was employed 
by the Domestic Missionary Society of Connecticut to preach in North Ston- 
ington, 1817-18, and after several months' service in Western New York, under 
commission from the Young Men's Evangelical Society of New York City, 
he settled as pastor in Bergen, N. Y., in 1819, continuing there till 1830, 
preaching also for a part of the time at Byron. He was acting pastor in 
Cambria, 1830-35; in Middleport, 1835-36; of the Chalmers Church, Niagara, 
1836-39 ; and at Niagara Falls, 1839-42. 

Owing to the failure of his voice, he was compelled to relinquish active 
ministerial labor, and in 1842 bought a tract of land in East Wilson, N. Y., 
and carried on farming very successfully, personally overseeing its work until 
within a few years of his death. During all this period he labored quietly 
but earnestly in behalf of the practical reforms of the time — temperance, anti- 
slavery, and peace. He was a special supporter of the American Peace Society, 
coming to its rescue more than once in time of financial need, and leaving 
to it a generous bequest at his death. " The last three years of his life were 
spent without disease, but with a gradual yielding of the vital forces to the 
advance of age. His highest enjoyment was to hear of the ' advancement 
of Christ's cause on the earth.' When his mind wandered, he seemed some- 
times to be near his early home, 'waiting for the ship to sail ;' sometimes to be 
officiating before his people, giving out hymns or dispensing the sacraments." 
His only publication was a sermon preached in 1829 in connection with the 
small pox epidemic. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1889 
from Williams College. He was, without doubt, the oldest graduate at the 
time of his death, not only of that college and of this Seminary, but of any 
similar institution in America. 

Mr. Halsey was married, June 15, 1820, to Sophia, daughter of Rev. Aaron 
Woolworth, D. D., of Bridgehampton, L. I. She died October 24, 1876. 
They had seven children, of whom three sons and two daughters are living. 
One son is a physician in Montrose, Penn., and another a teacher in Schenec- 
tady, N.Y. 

He died of old age, at East Wilson, N. Y., March 23, 1891, aged ninety- 
seven years, eight months, seven days. 



GLASS OP 1824. 

Frederic Edwards Cannon, D.D. 

Son of Maj. Cornelius Cannon and Mary Weeks; born in Greenwich, 
Mass., January 20, 1800 ; prepared for college at Amherst Academy ; finished 
the full course at Williams College, 1821, but owing to the resignation of 
President Moore took his diploma from Union College, 1822 ; entered the 
Seminary in 1821. He was agent of the A. B. C. F. M. in Maine and Vermont, 
1824-26; ordained as evangelist at Williamstown, Vt., October II, 1825; pastor 
in Ludlow and Cavendish, Vt., 1826-27, and in Ludlow till 1831 ; pastor of 
Presbyterian church in Potsdam, N. Y., 1831-35. From 1835 to 1862 he was 
District Secretary of the A. B. C. F. M., residing at Geneva, N.Y., and accom- 
plishing an important work among the churches of a large region in the interest 
of missions. He continued his residence in Geneva until his death. Hamil- 
ton College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1851. 

He was married, September 5, 1827, to Eliza, daughter of Recompense 
Cary, Esq., of Ward (now Auburn), Mass. She died January 30, 1890. One 
of their two daughters died in 1866 ; the other resides in Geneva, the widow 
of Dr. Andrew Merrell. 

Dr. Cannon died in Geneva, N. Y., of acute nephritis, April 7, 1891, at the 
age of ninety- one. 

CLASS OF 1826. 
Paul Couch. 

Son of John Couch and Sarah Heard ; born in Newburyport, Mass., June 
21, 1803; prepared for college in his native town; graduated at Dartmouth 
College, 1823; in the Seminary, 1823-26. He was ordained March 21, 1827, 
as pastor in West Newbury, Mass., but in 1829 went to Bethlehem, Conn., his 
pastorate there continuing until 1834. He supplied Dr; Codman's church, 
Dorchester, one year, during the pastor's absence in Europe, and was installed 
pastor over the church in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), Mass., October 7, 
1835, where he remained for twenty- four years. He was acting pastor at 
North Cambridge, Mass., 1859-60, and resided in Cambridgeport, 1860-61, sup- 
plying at different places, as also during the two following years, while resident 
in Jewett City, Conn. In 1863 he began to supply the Second Church in Ston. 
ington, Conn., and continued its pastor for twenty- four years, being nearly 
eighty-four years old when he laid down the work in 1887. He removed his 
residence from Jewett City to Mystic Bridge (now Mystic) in 1876, and there 
remained until his death. " During his entire ministry he was a bold and fearless 
advocate of the cause of temperance, and was an uncompromising champion 
of the cause of freedom and human rights, at a time when to be such was 
unpopular, if not positively dangerous." He was for twenty years a member of 
the school committee in North Bridgewater, and represented that town in the 
Legislature in 1857 and 1858, as also the town of Griswold in the Connecticut 
Legislature in 1869. Four of his sermons were published. 

He was married, May 28, 1827, to Harriett, daughter of James Tyler, of 
Griswold, Conn. She died August 23, 1874. Of their seven children, three 
sons survive. 

Mr. Couch died of bronchitis, in Mystic, Conn., March 7, 1891, in his 
eighty- eighth year. 



GLASS OP 1830. 

George Barrell Cheever, D.D. 

Son of Nathaniel Cheever and Charlotte Barrell; born in Hallowell, Me., 
April 17, 1807 ; prepared for college at Hallowell Academy; graduated at Bow- 
doin College, 1825; in the Seminary, 1825-26 and 1828-30. After his gradu- 
ation he preached temporarily in Nevvburyport and in the Essex Street Church, 
Boston, and was ordained February 13, 1833, as pastor of the Howard Street 
Church, Salem, Mass., remaining there until 1836. He traveled in Europe, 
1836-38, and was pastor of the Allen Street Presbyterian Church, New York 
City, 1838-44. Returning from another European tour in 1846, he aided in 
the formation of the Church of the Puritans in New York, and was its pastor 
until 1867. He removed from New York to Englewood, N. J., in 1870, and 
resided there without pastoral charge until his death. 

Dr. Cheever was, throughout his whole ministry, fearless, eloquent, and 
unsparing in his denunciation of evil and his advocacy of political and moral 
reforms, delivering multitudinous discourses and platform addresses on intem- 
perance, slavery, the Sabbath question, and the Bible in public schools. His 
writings, largely though not wholly upon similar subjects, were also voluminous. 
Before he left Andover, he had published the American Commonplace Book of 
Prose, and American Commonplace Book of Poetry. During his Salem pastorate 
the publication of his dream, Inquire at Amos Giles's Distillery, called wide 
attention to the temperance reform, and secured for its author, on the ground 
of libel, a thirty days' imprisonment in Salem jail, in addition to a fine of one 
thousand dollars. God's Hand in America, Lectures on the Pilgrim's Progress, 
Wanderings of a Pilgrim in the Shadow of Mont Blanc, and Windings of the 
River of the Water of Life, published while he was in New York, were very 
popular and useful books. The Gicilt of Slavery and the Crime of Slave hoi ding, 
demonstrated from the Greek and Hebrew Scriptures, was published in i860. 
As late as 1888 he wrote God's Timepiece for Man's Eternity, and, since his 
death, a book of Memorial Offerings, in part autobiographical, has been edited 
by his brother, Rev. H. T. Cheever. The Year-Book gives fifty-eight titles, 
not including his contributions to the Bibliotheca Sacra, North American 
Review, and other magazines. He was at one time editor of the New York 
Evangelist, and an associate writer, with Drs. Bacon, Storrs, Thompson, and 
Leavitt, for the New York Independent in its early days. 

On leaving his New York pastorate, he gave his residence there jointly to 
the American Board and the American Missionary Association, and left liberal 
bequests to those and other societies. The University of the City of New York 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1844. 

He was married, November 21, 1845, t0 Elizabeth Hoppin, daughter of 
Samuel Wetmore, of New York, who died November 19, 1886. Their only 
child died in infancy. 

Dr. Cheever died of inflammation of the bowels, in Englewood, N. J., 
October 1, 1890, in his eighty- fourth year. 



8 



John Ballard Kendall. 

Son of Jesse Kendall and Elizabeth Raymond; born in Phillipston, Mass., 
December 26, 1799; prepared for college at New Salem (Mass.) Academy, and 
New Ipswich (N. H.) Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1827 ; in the 
Seminary, 1827-30. He was ordained at Hartford, N.Y., in 1831, preached in 
Hartford, Easton, and Brunswick, N.Y.; was pastor in Bethany, Conn., 1834- 
36, and in South Wilbraham, Mass., the following year. He afterwards taught 
in West Troy, N. Y., and preached a short time in North Granville, N.Y. In 
1840 he abandoned the ministry and engaged in farming in Butler, N.Y. 
He subsequently removed to Eckford, Mich., and was in farming and other busi- 
ness there. Having become hopelessly insane, he was committed to the Michigan 
Asylum for the Insane in 1879, an d continued there until his death. 

He was married, November 14, 183 1, to Mary Ann, daughter of Stephen 
Wyman, of Ashby, Mass. She died in July, 1836, and in December, 1839, he 
married Mary Covell, of Hartford, N.Y., who died March 1, 1870. He had 
one daughter, who is still living. 

Mr. Kendall died of old age, in Kalamazoo, Mich., March 31, 1888, in his 
eighty- ninth year. 

GLASS OF 1831. 

Daniel Cole Blood. 

Son of Stephen Blood and Bethiah Cole; born in Orford, N. H., February 
2,1803; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H.; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1828, taking the full course at the Seminary. 
He was ordained at Bradford, Mass., by the Presbytery of Newburyport, 
September 26, 1831, and went immediately to the West in the service of the 
American Home Missionary Society. He was stationed at Covington and 
Newport, Ky., 1831-32, and at Cheviot and Cleves, Ohio, 1832-34. In 1834 
he was chaplain of the Seamen's Bethel at Cleveland, Ohio, and from 1834 to 
1836 labored in the Congregational church at Strongsville, Ohio. He was 
pastor of the Presbyterian church at Tecumseh, Mich., 1837-39, and Secretary 
of the Western Reserve Branch of the American Education Society, residing 
at Hudson, Ohio, 1840-42. Returning to Strongsville, he was pastor there, 
1842-51, and of the Presbyterian church, Massillon, Ohio, 1851-66. From 1866 
he resided at Collamer, now East Cleveland, Ohio, occasionally preaching. 
His Christian life was one of marked piety, and his ministerial service one of 
marked fidelity. 

He was married, August 1, 1833, to Delia, daughter of Wolcott Allyn, of 
Randolph, Vt., then a teacher in the Female Seminary at Chillicothe, Ohio. 
Their two children died in childhood. Mrs. Blood is still living. 

Mr. Blood died at East Cleveland, Ohio, June 3, 1889, of senile gangrene, 
at the age of eighty- six. 

William Thurston Boutwell. 

Son of Nehemiah Boutwell and Elizabeth Jones; born in Lyndeborough, 
N. H., February 4, 1803; prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1828; and took the full theological course 
at Andover. Responding, together with Sherman Hall of his class, to an appeal 



9 

made at the Seminary by Rev. Elias Cornelius, Secretary of the American 
Board, for missionaries to go to the Ojibways of the Northwest Territory, they 
were licensed by the Suffolk North Association, at the house of Dr. Lyman 
Beecher, in Boston, April 26, 1831, ordained at Woburn, June 7, 1831, and 
made the five weeks' journey to Mackinaw. Mr. Boutwell spent nearly a year 
there and at Sault Ste. Marie, learning the language and laboring among the 
Indians. In 1832 he accompanied the government exploring expedition under 
Mr. Schoolcraft, his journal of which was afterwards published in the Mission- 
ary Herald. After laboring a few months with Mr. Hall at La Pointe Island, 
Lake Superior, he established in 1833 a station at Leech Lake, in the almost 
unknown wilderness of the Upper Mississippi, and so "was the first ordained 
minister of any branch of the Church to become a resident among the Indians 
of Minnesota." There and at Pokeguma Lake, near the present St. Paul, he 
remained until 1846, experiencing many privations and perils, especially in con- 
nection with the warfare between the Ojibways and Dakotas. That region 
having been ceded to the whites, he removed to a farm near Stillwater, Minn., 
and labored among the new settlers, establishing Sunday-schools and churches 
at various points. From 1854 he was without charge. 

When the first Territorial Legislature of Minnesota met at St. Paul in 1849, 
he was elected chaplain. He afterwards served as chaplain of the State Prison 
at Stillwater. While in the Indian mission, he aided in the translation of the 
gospels, of a hymn book, and of " Peter Parley's Geography " into the Ojib- 
way language. 

Mr. Boutwell married, September n, 1834, Hester, daughter of Ramsay 
Crooks, who was educated at the Mackinaw mission school, and who was at 
that time a teacher in the Indian school at Yellow Lake. She died October 
15, 1853, and he married, September 26, 1855, Mary Ann Bergin, of Lancas- 
ter, N. H., who died February 5, 1868. Of nine children, five are still living. 
Three sons were soldiers in the Union army. One daughter studied medicine, 
and had at one time a sanitarium at Saratoga ; another is a teacher in the 
public schools of St. Paul. 

Mr. Boutwell died of old age, at Stillwater, Minn., Oct. II, 1890, in his 
eighty- eighth year. 

Nathaniel Smith Folsom, D.D. 

Son of Nathaniel Folsom and Mary Smith; born in Portsmouth, N.H., 
March 12, 1806; prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy; graduated 
at Dartmouth College, 1828 ; took the full course in the Seminary. He was 
ordained as an evangelist by the Newburyport Presbytery at Bradford, Mass., 
September 26, 1831, and went as a home missionary to Liberty County, Georgia, 
returning on horseback in 1832. He supplied the Presbyterian church in 
Cleveland, Ohio, until February, 1833, and was then for one year professor of 
Languages in the Literary Department of Cincinnati Lane Seminary (afterwards 
Lane Theological Seminary). From 1834 to 1836 he was professor of Biblical 
Literature, and preacher in the college chapel, at Western Reserve College. 
He was pastor in Francestown, N. H., 1836-38, of the High Street Church, 
Providence, R. I., 1838-40, and of the Unitarian Church, Haverhill, Mass., 
1840-46, becoming then minister at large, Charlestown, Mass., and editor of 
the Christian Register, Boston. From 1849 to J 86i he was professor of Biblical 



10 



Literature in the Theological School, Meadville, Perm., serving also for several 
years as pastor of the Unitarian church in that town. He was engaged in 
private teaching from 1862 to 1880, residing in Concord, Mass. (where he 
served for one year as pastor of the Congregational church), until 1874, and in 
Boston. He afterwards made his home with his children, and spent the last 
five winters of his life at Asheville, N.C. 

He published an Interpretation of the Prophecies of Daniel in 1842, and a 
Trmtslation of the Four Gospels in 1869. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Dartmouth College in 1879. R ev - A. A.Livermore, D.D., writes : 
His " faithful and honorable service as teacher, pastor, editor, and scholar, will 
be gratefully remembered in our household of faith and the Church universal. " 

He was married, September 30, 1832, to Ann Wendell, daughter of Hon. 
Hunking Penhallow, of Portsmouth, N. H., who died April 9, 1885. They had 
eight children, of whom four are living ; one son fell in the battle of Iuka in 
the War of the Rebellion, and another is a well-known physician of Boston. 

Dr Folsom died of congestion of the lungs, at Asheville, N.C, Novem- 
ber 10, 1890, in the eighty-fifth year of his age, and was buried at Ports" 
mouth, N. H. 



Sewall Tenney, D.D. 

Son of Silas Tenney and Rebecca Bailey; born in Bradford, Mass., Au- 
gust 27, 1801, but his home, after he was three years old, was in Chester, 
N. H.; prepared for college at Atkinson (N. H.) Academy, and Moor's Charity 
School, Hanover, N.H. ; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1827; was precep- 
tor of Woodman Sanbomton (N. H.) Academy, 1827-28; in the Seminary, 
1828-31. He was ordained as an evangelist by the Newburyport Presbytery at 
Bradford, Mass., August 10, 1831. He was acting pastor at Gorham, Me., 
1831-32, and seamen's preacher at the Bethel Church, Portland, Me., 1832-35. 
He then commenced his pastorate in Ellsworth, Me., which continued until 
1877 — a useful and honored service of forty- two years. He still retained his 
residence in that town. He was a trustee of Bowdoin College, which con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1861. 

Dr. Tenney was married, October 21, 1833, to Sarah Moody, daughter of 
John Pearson, of Bangor, Me., who died January 14, 1880. 

He died of old age, at Ellsworth, Me., June 6, 1890, in his eighty-ninth 
year. 

Thomas Bellows. {Non* graduate.} 

Son of Hon. Thomas Bellows and Eleanor Foster; born in Walpole, 
N. H., September 23, 1807 ; prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1827 ; spent two years in the Seminary, and 
his senior year at Yale Divinity School, 1830-31. He was ordained March 12, 
1833, as pastor of the Second Congregational Church, Greenfield, Mass., and 
dismissed September 2, 1834. Although afterwards instrumental in the forma- 
tion of an Orthodox Congregational church in Lunenburg, Mass., and serving 
as its pastor, 1835-36, the failure of his health compelled him to relinquish the 
ministry, and to retire to a farm in his native town. He served for several 



II 



years as school committee, and represented the town in the State Legislature in 
1851. He left the bulk of his estate to the American Board. 

He died at Walpole, N. H., of typhoid pneumonia, August 16, 1890, in 
his eighty-third year. He was never married. 



Edmund Albern Crawley, D.D., D.C.L. (Non-graduate.) 

Son of Capt. Thomas Crawley and Esther Bernal ; born in Ipswich, Suffolk, 
England, January 20, 1799. The father was an officer in the British Navy, and 
when a midshipman served under Nelson. The mother, whose name, trans- 
posed, she gave to her son, was a converted Jewess from London ; her brother, 
Ralph Bernal, marrying Lady Osborne, took her name, and, as Bernal Osborne, 
became a famous politician and orator in the House of Commons. Captain 
Crawley settled near Sydney in Cape Breton Island, of which he was for many 
years Crown Surveyor. Under his instruction the son was prepared for college, 
and graduated at King's College, Windsor, N. S., in 1820. He studied law 
with Judge James W. Johnston, Halifax, and practiced his profession several 
years in that city. As the result of a deep religious experience, he united, in 
1828, with a Baptist church in Halifax, and decided to prepare for the ministry. 
He at once came to Andover, and was in the class of 1831 for one and one-half 
years, studying also under President Wayland in Providence, R. I., where he 
was ordained as an evangelist, May 16, 1830. After traveling in this country 
and visiting England, he was pastor of the Granville Street Baptist Church, 
Halifax, of which he was a member, from 183 1 until he was elected, in 1838, 
professor of Logic, Mental Philosophy, and Rhetoric, in Acadia College (then 
called Queen's College), Wolfville, N. S., founded in that year. He acted as 
associate president until 1847, and after five years' further service in his Halifax 
pastorate, was president and professor of Theology, 1853-55. From 1855 to 1865 
he was in the United States as principal of the Mt. Auburn Young Ladies' 
Institute, Cincinnati, O., 1856-60, and pastor of Baptist church there; associate 
principal of the Limestone Springs Female Seminary, Spartanburg District, S. C, 
from i860 until it was closed by the war; afterwards teaching in Shelby, N.C., 
until the restoration of peace. From 1866 he was professor of Rhetoric and 
principal of the Theological Department in Acadia College, filling both positions 
until 1882, when he was made professor emeritus. 

Dr. Crawley was a pillar of strength, both as a minister and as an educator, 
in his denomination in the maritime provinces. A few months before his death 
he attended the jubilee celebration of the college, of which he had been the 
principal founder fifty years before, and though in his ninetieth year made a 
short address and received a splendid ovation. Brown University conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1844, and King's College that of 
Doctor of Civil Law in 1888. 

He was married, May 28, 1833, to Julia Amelia Wilby, of Boston, who died 
August 19, 1842, leaving one son since deceased. He next married, December 
5, 1843, Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Lewis Johnston, of Annandale, N. S., who 
survives him, with five of their six children. The eldest son, Bernal Crawley, is 
a lawyer in Wolfville. 

Dr. Crawley died of pneumonia, at his home in Wolfville, N. S., September 
27, 1888, aged eighty- nine years and eight months. 



12 



GLASS OP 1832. 

Joseph Washburn Sessions. 

Son of Dea. John Sessions and Lucinda Washburn ; born in Lunenburg, 
Vt., June 30, 1801 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; gradu- 
ated at Bowdoin College, 1829; in the Seminary, 1829-32. During the year 
after his graduation he preached at Croydon, N.H., and Boothbay, Me. He 
was ordained as pastor of the church at West Needham, now Wellesley, Mass., 
October 2, 1833, anci remained there nine years. He was pastor in West Suf- 
field, Conn., 1842-52; of the Centrebrook Church, Essex, Conn., 1852-54; in 
West Woodstock, Conn., 1854-63; Durham Centre, Conn., 1863-68; West- 
minster, Conn., 1868-78. He continued to reside at Westminster, without 
charge, until 1881, afterwards at Chaplin, Conn. "The many revivals which 
blessed his labors prove that his genial nature, his energetic disposition, and his 
warm heart were consecrated supremely to the Redeemer and the work received 
from his hands. When he had been in the ministry forty-two years, he had 
only missed preaching five Sabbaths." 

Mr. Sessions was married, October 17, 1833, to Mary Sewall, daughter of 
Andrew Dunning, of Brunswick, Me. She died May 13, 1877. His second 
wife, Orra, daughter of David Storer, of Chaplin, Conn., to whom he was 
married June 5, 1878, survives him. His two daughters were educated at 
Mount Holyoke Seminary; one died in 1883, and the other resides in Waterbury, 
Conn. 

He died in Chaplin, Conn., of old age, June 10, 1890, lacking a few days of 
eighty- nine years. 

GLASS OP 1833. 

William Whiting Newell, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Ebenezer Newell and Anna Whiting; born in South Natick, Mass., 
September 17, 1807 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; grad- 
uated at Yale College, 1830; studied theology in the Seminary, 1830-32, and 
afterwards with Rev. Henry Allen, D.D., New York City. He was ordained as 
an evangelist at Providence, R. I., July 15, 1833, anc ^ was installed pastor over 
the church in Brighton, Mass., August 19, 1834, remaining there three years. 
From 1837 to 1842 he was pastor of the Maverick Church, East Boston, Mass. 
He then filled pastorates of Presbyterian churches successively in Montgomery, 
N.Y., 1842-47; Syracuse, N.Y., 1847-59; Allen Street Church, New York 
City, 1859-73 ; 84th Street Church, New York City, 1873-76. From that time 
he was without charge, residing in New York, in Cambridge, Mass., from 1884, 
and from 1889 in Andover. One of his little religious books, The Rescue, 
published by the American Tract Society, had an immense circulation in this 
country, and was reprinted in Australia, in Paris, and an Arabic edition at 
Beirut. William E. Dodge aided in the publication and circulation of a larger 
book entitled, Revivals, How and When ? He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Hamilton College in 1859. 

He married, May 25, 1836, Hannah Tuckerman, daughter of John Parkman, 
of Boston, who died April 10, 1837. He next married, October 2, 1838, Ednah 
Cushing, daughter of Oliver Shaw, the musical composer, of Providence, R. I. 



13 

She died August 6, 1867, and he married, December 14, 1869, Mrs - Emma J. Bing- 
ham, of New York. Her death occurred October 2,1875. Two sons — Rev. 
W. W. Newell of Paris, and George B. Newell, now a lawyer in New York — 
and two daughters are living. Three children died in childhood, and a daughter, 
the wife of Rev. Henry M. Booth, D.D., in 1867. 

Dr. Newell died in Pepperell, Mass., May 12, 1891 ; while in very feeble 
health he fell and broke his leg, and did not recover from the shock. He was 
in his eighty-fourth year. 

GLASS OF 1834. 

Samuel Storrs Howe. 

Son of Col. Job Lane Howe and Deborah Barrows; born in Shoreham, Vt., 
June 20, 1808; prepared for college at Castleton (Vt.) Seminary; graduated at 
Middlebury College, 1829; entered the Seminary in 1829, but was away for a 
part of the time, being preceptor of Castleton Seminary, 1830-31, teacher in 
Edgehill Seminary, Princeton, N.J., 1832-33, and studying one year in Princeton 
Theological Seminary. He was tutor at Middlebury, 1835-36, and teacher in 
Canandaigua (N.Y.) Academy, 1836-38; preached at Dresden, N.Y., 1838-39; 
and was successively in charge of churches at Painted Post, N.Y. (where he was 
ordained May 6, 1841), 1840-42; Ticonderoga, 1843-44; Brasher Falls, 1844-48. 
Spending one year at Auburn, N.Y., as Secretary of the Western Education 
Society, he removed in 1849 to Iowa City, Io., and always afterwards resided 
there, except when temporarily supplying the Congregational church in Eliza- 
bethtown, N.Y., in 1861, and when for a short time inmate of the Presbyterian 
Ministers' Home at Perth Amboy, N.J. He was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church, 1849-51 ; Secretary of Church Erection for Iowa, 1851-54 ; editor of the 
Iowa Temperance Journal, 1854-55; pastor again in 1856; Secretary of Iowa 
Colonization Society, 1857; editor of the Literary Advertiser, 1859-60; after- 
wards supplied vacant churches, and was city missionary. He was at one time 
Librarian of the State Historical Society, and edited its Annals of Iowa in 1863 ; 
he afterwards edited an independent quarterly publication bearing the same 
name. 

Mr. Howe died of pneumonia, at Iowa City, Io., October 24, 1888, aged 
eighty years. He was never married. 



Daniel Leach, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Apollos Leach and Chloe Dyer; born in Bridgewater, Mass., June 12, 
1806; graduated at Brown University, 1830; studied in the junior class of this 
Seminary, 1831-32, and afterwards with Bishop Alexander Viets Griswold at 
Salem, where he was ordained deacon, February 7, 1833. After a short service 
in Northampton, Mass., he became rector of Christ Church, Quincy, Mass., where 
he was ordained priest April 10, 1834, and where he remained for five years. 
From 1838 to 1844 ne was principal of the Classical School in Roxbury, and 
carried on a select boarding school there until 1850. He was agent of the 
Massachusetts Board of Education, under Dr. Barnas Sears, from 1851 to 1855, 
when he was appointed superintendent of public schools in Providence, R. I., 
holding that office for nearly thirty years. During that period he published a 



14 

number of school text-books, including the Complete Spelling- Book, the Geo- 
graphical Question- Book, and an arithmetic. He was a member of the Rhode 
Island Board of Education from 1870, and trustee of Brown University from 
1877. The University conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
in 1875. 

He married, May 19, 1834, Mary, daughter of Capt. Robert Lawton, of New- 
port, R. I., who died July 2, 1879. Of three children, one son and one daughter 
are living, a daughter having died in childhood. 

Dr. Leach died of old age, at Providence, R. I., May 16, 1891, having nearly 
completed his eighty-fifth year. 

GLASS OP 1835. 

John Orville Taylor. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Edward Taylor and Eunice Curtis; born in Charlton, N.Y., May 
14, 1807; prepared for college at Schenectady (N.Y.) Academy; graduated at 
Union College, 1830 ; entered Princeton Theological Seminary, but left soon 
to teach in Philadelphia, attending also to the study of medicine; in the 
Seminary, 1832-33. He was for fifteen years constantly and earnestly engaged 
in the cause of educational reform, residing in New York City, but delivering 
lectures throughout the State, and in other States. From 1836 to 1840 he 
edited and published the Common School Assistant. His District School, or 
National Education, first issued in 1834, went through three large editions. In 
1837, as professor of Popular Education in the University of the City of New 
York, he delivered a course of lectures to a class of seventy young teachers, 
being the first normal school in the State. He was subsequently in business, 
but in 1880 removed to New Brunswick, N. J., and was until 1886 engaged in 
journalistic work. 

He was married, December 16, 1835, to Jane, daughter of Andrew Agnew, 
of New Brunswick. She survives him, but their only son died in 1883. 

Mr. Taylor died of consumption, in New Brunswick, N. J., January 19, 1890, 
in his eighty- third year. 

GLASS OF 1836. 

James Bryant Hadley. 

Son of Thomas Hadley and Phebe Bryant; born in Goffstown, N.H., 
January 8, 1805; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; grad- 
uated at Amherst College, 1833 ; entered the Seminary at once, from Wenham, 
Mass. He was ordained September 20, 1837, as pastor of the Union Evan- 
gelical Church, Amesbury and Salisbury, Mass., continuing in that pastorate 
until 1848. After a period of ill health, during a part of which he was employed 
as Bible agent in Essex County, he was installed pastor in Standish, Me., in 
1851, remaining there seven years. His last pastorate, from 1858 to 1863, was 
at Campton, N.H., and in that town he continued to reside until his death, 
although he supplied the church in Wentworth the following year, and occa- 
sionally preached afterwards in different pulpits. " He was a man of strong 
faith, and an active, every-day Christian. He loved his Master's service. He 
loved to talk of the other home, and for a long time had been waiting patiently 
for the summons to call him thither." Rev. Daniel Butler, class of 1838, 



15 

writes: "I have known very few to whom the Master's description more 
properly applies, ' An Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile.' " 

Mr. Hadley was married, January 10, 1838, to Louisa, daughter of Eleazer 
Cowles, of North Amherst, Mass. She died June 20, 1868, and he was married 
March 29, 1870, to Eliza M. Page, of Warren, Me., daughter of David Page, of 
Lowell, Mass., who survives him. 

He died of influenza, at Campton, N. H., August 10, 1890, in his eighty- 
sixth year. 

Samuel Salisbury Tappan. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Tappan and Sarah Salisbury ; born in Boston, September 2, 
1809 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and Amherst 
Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1833; in the Seminary, 1834-35. 
He was ordained at Frankfort, now Winterport, Me., November 11, 1835, 
and remained there until 1841. He was pastor in Bridgewater, Mass., 1842-44; 
Holmes' Hole, now Vineyard Haven, Mass., 1845-48; Conway, N. H., 1849-52. 
He resided for twenty years in Providence, R. I. , afterwards in Boston, Worces- 
ter, Halifax, N. S., and from 1887 in Philadelphia. He occasionally practiced 
as a physician, having studied medicine for a time with the resident physician 
of Bloomingdale (N. Y.) Asylum before entering college. 

He married, November 4, 1835, Eveline L., daughter of Jesse Stearns, of 
New Ipswich, N. H., who died March 27, 1850. He next married, January 14, 
1851, Hannah, daughter of Rev. Sylvester Dana, of Concord, N.H. She died 
April 19, 1855, and he married, April 7, 1857, Eleanor Hall, daughter of James 
Hall Butler, of Providence, R. I., who died April 17, 1872. One son and two 
daughters are living, two children having died in infancy. 

Mr. Tappan died of pneumonia, in St. Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Penn., November 26, 1890, aged eighty years, and was buried in New Ipswich, 
N.H. 

GLASS OP 1837. 

Calvin Butler. 

Son of Samuel Butler and Hannah Lund; born in Pelham, N.H., April 
25, 1810; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1834, and took the full course in the Seminary. In 1836 he 
was instructor of Sacred Music in the Teachers' Seminary, Andover. After 
graduation he was engaged in home missionary work for a few months at Rich- 
mond, N.H., and at Saccarappa, Me. He was ordained October 31, 1838, as 
colleague pastor with Rev. Moses Miller, Heath, Mass., where he remained 
two years. He preached at Burlington, Conn., for six months in 1840, and for 
a year at Salisbury, Vt., beginning in 1841 a four years' pastorate in Bristol, Vt. 
His voice then failing, he spent twenty years in teaching : as principal of Wash- 
ington Academy, Salem, N. Y., 1845-48 ; of New Paltz (N.Y.) Academy, 1848-51 ; 
of Somerset Young Ladies' Institute, Somerville, N.J., 1851-62; of Somerset 
Classical Institute at same place, 1863-64; of Salisbury (Conn.) Academy, 
1864-65. He was without charge at Mendon, Mass., 1865-71, with the excep- 
tion of one year, 1866-67, spent in Eastport, Me., as acting pastor. From 187 1 
to 1882 he resided in Worcester, Mass. (being city missionary there in 1880), 
and from 1882 in Schenectady, N.Y. "The last ten years of his life were 



i6 



devoted largely to study and Biblical research. His presence in any community 
was conspicuous by his Christian life and influence." 

Mr. Butler was married, May 20, 1839, to Eliza Fairbanks, daughter of 
Ebenezer Peck, of Mendon, Mass., who died May 13, 1887. Their only child 
died at the age of three years. 

He died of old age, at Schenectady, N.Y., June II, 1890, being eighty years 
old. He was buried at Mendon. 

GLASS OP 1838. 

Burtis Cunningham Megie, D.D. [Non-graduate.) 

Son of Daniel Hull Megie and Elizabeth Woodruff ; born in New York 
City, December 4, 1813; prepared for college at Bloomfield (N.J.) Academy; 
graduated at the University of New York, 1835 ; studied in this Seminary, 
1835-36; in Princeton Theological Seminary, 1836-37; in Union Theological 
Seminary, 1837-38. He was ordained as an evangelist by the North River 
Presbytery, October 31, 1838, and supplied the church in New Paltz, N.Y., 
one year. In 1839 he was called to the pastorate of the Presbyterian church 
in Dover, N.J. , which he filled with great fidelity and success for thirty-seven 
years. Resigning that charge in 1876, he was pastor at Pleasant Grove, N. J., 
until 1888. Having the year before been appointed by the State Board of 
Education as Superintendent of Schools for Morris County, he then returned to 
his old residence at Dover, and labored in that service until his death. He did 
not, however, cease from ministerial service, but regularly supplied the Welsh 
church near Dover, thus emphasizing his last report to the Alumni : " Have 
done nothing but preach since I left the Seminary." He was a member of the 
New Jersey Historical Society, and contributed to the press many articles on 
local history. He served as chaplain under the United States Christian Com- 
mission in Tennessee in 1863, was for a long series of years the Stated Clerk of 
his Presbytery, and repeatedly a delegate to foreign ecclesiastical bodies. His 
alma mater conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1875. 

He was married, December 4, 1838, to Mary Cass, daughter of Rev. Will- 
iam Belden, of New York City, who survives him, with their six children. 

Dr. Megie died of heart disease, at Dover, N. J., June 12, 1890, in his 
seventy-seventh year. 

James Rosamond. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Samuel Rosamond and Sarah Hodges ; born in Pendleton, S.C., 
September 6, 1806; graduated at Miami University, Ohio, 1833; m tn * s Sem- 
inary, 1835-36; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1836-37; Columbia (S. C.) 
Theological Seminary, 1837-38. He was in the home missionary service of the 
Presbyterian Board in Ripley and Farmington, Miss., 1838-41. For several 
years afterward he taught in Georgia ; preaching also to churches in Alcovia, 
Jacksonville, Fellowship, McDonough, and Fayetteville C. H. He was ordained 
in Newman, Ga., October 22, 1849, and preached for a time at Raleigh, Tenn., 
in connection with the charge of schools. From autograph letter (1882) : " 1852 
found me president of Female College, Kosciusko, Miss., serving the church, 
and also French camps. In 1855 founded Female College, Starkville, Miss., 
and served church of Big Springs, also Unity, Hebron, and others. About this 



17 

time the war broke out, during the course of which I resided at Fayette C. H., 
Ala., and preached and taught as circumstances allowed, everything being in 
great confusion. After peace, I taught Academy in Union City, Tenn., and 
served Harmony Church ; 1869, went to the Parker Institute and Church, Troy, 
Mo. ; 1872, had charge of Austin Synodical College, Texas, and the church at 
Waverly; subsequently had charge of the County High School at Mesopo- 
potamia." He resided in Memphis, Tenn., from 1878, without charge. 

He was married in November, 1839, to Elsie Taylor, of Mississippi. Of 
nine children, two daughters and three sons are living. 

He died of kidney disease, in Memphis, Tenn., April 23, 1889, in his 
eighty- third year. 



Edward Josiah Stearns, D.D. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Elijah Stearns and Elizabeth Stearns (the mother being a daughter 
of Rev. Josiah Stearns, of Epping, N. H., and sister of Rev. Samuel Stearns, of 
Bedford); born in Bedford, Mass., February 24, 1810; prepared for college at 
Concord Academy and Warren Academy, Woburn ; spent part of his freshman 
year at Amherst College, and graduated at Harvard College, 1833; taught at 
Norfolk and Alexandria, Va., 1833-34, and in Dorchester, 1834-35; studied 
theology in the Seminary, 1835-36, and afterward in private. He was preceptor 
of Fuller Academy, West Newton, 1839. He was ordained a deacon of the 
Episcopal church at Newton Lower Falls, June 14, 1840, and was in charge 
of St. James' Church, Amesbury, Mass., that year. He was professor in Jubi- 
lee College, 111., 1841-42, and teacher of a young ladies' school in Richmond, Va., 
1842-43. He was ordained priest in Baltimore, Md., December 24, 1843, anc * 
spent most of his life in that State. He was rector of Grace Church, Elk Ridge 
Landing, 1843-45; professor of Modern Languages, College of St. James, near 
Hagerstown, 1845-46; instructor in Public High School, now City College, 
Baltimore, 1846-47; rector of St. Peter's, Ellicott City, 1847-48; professor of 
Modern Languages, St. John's College, Annapolis, 1849-53 > instructor in 
St. Timothy's Hall, Catonsville, 1854-55, and again, 1859-60, and 1864-65 ; 
sub-master, Boston Latin School, 1856-57; instructor in Mystic Hall Seminary 
for young ladies, Medford, Mass., 1858; in his native home at Bedford, i860, 
but returned to the South soon after the breaking out of the Civil War ; rector 
of St. Paul's Church, Centreville, Md., 1862-63; in charge of St. John's Church, 
Howard County, 1865-66; rector of Dorchester parish, and principal of classi- 
cal school, Cambridge, 1866-68 ; chaplain of Maryland Hospital for Insane, 
Baltimore, 1869-70; rector of St. Mary's Whitechapel parish, Denton, 1871-78; 
afterwards resided without charge in Easton. 

Among his published works were : Notes on Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1853 ; 
Afterpiece to the Comedy of Convocation, 1870 ; Birth and New Birth, a New 
Treatment of an Old Subject, 1873 5 The Faith of our Forefathers, an Exami- 
nation of Cardinal Gibbous's Faith of our Fathers, 1879. He was f° r a short 
time associate editor of Bledsoe's Southern Review. Hobart College gave him 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1874. 

Dr. Stearns died of old age, at Easton, Md., July 6, 1890, aged eighty years. 
He was never married. 



18 
GLASS OF 1839. 

Charles William Treadwell. 

Son of William Treadwell and Hannah Bancroft; born in Salem, Mass., 
June 25, 1816; prepared for college at Salem Grammar School; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1836; in the Seminary, 1836-39. He was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Albany at Cohoes, N. Y., in 1842, and was pastor at Moreau, N. Y., 
1841-51; Theresa and Plessis, N. Y., 1851-63; Wheatland, Io., 1863-69; Clar- 
ence, Io., 1869-75. He spent the remaining years of his life in Wheatland, 
and was at different times the stated supply of the church there. He was 
accounted the ablest preacher in his Presbytery, and was a man of great hon- 
esty of purpose and transparency of character. 

He was married July 15, 1851, to Ellen, daughter of Seth Hawley, of 
Moreau, N. Y., who died December 17, 1853. He married, September 14, 1857, 
Cornelia Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Suits, of Plessis, N. Y. She died Jan- 
uary 10, 1880. His only daughter resides at Wheatland. 

Mr. Treadwell died of congestion of the heart, in Wheatland, Io., July 4, 
1888, aged seventy-two years. 

CLASS OP 1841. 

William Walter Woodworth, D.D. 

Son of Walter Woodworth and Mary Sage ; born at Middletown " Upper 
Houses" (now Cromwell), Conn, October 16, 1813; prepared for college by 
private study ; graduated at Yale College, 1838 ; was principal of Westfield 
(Mass.) Academy, 1838-39 ; in Yale Divinity School, 1839-40 ; in this Semi- 
nary, 1840-41. He was ordained pastor of the church in Berlin, Conn., July 
6, 1842, and remained there ten years. He then filled successively pastor- 
ates in Waterbury, Conn., 1852-58; Mansfield, Ohio, 1858-60; Olivet Church, 
Springfield, Mass., 1860-62; Plymouth, Mass., 1862-64; Painesville, Ohio, 
1864-66; Belchertown, 1866-70; Grinnell, Io., 1871-75. Being called by the 
people of his first charge in Berlin, he was there re-installed January 6, 1876, 
continuing active and efficient service until his death. Mr. Woodworth's cen- 
tennial address at Berlin, 1875, was published, and a posthumous volume 
entitled The Lord's Prayer jztid Other Sermons. He received in 1879 tfte 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Iowa College. 

He married, October 26, 1842, Lucy, daughter of Dr. William Atwater, of 
Westfield, Mass. She died July 4, 1844, and he married, October 9, 1845, Sarah 
Upson, daughter of Rev. Charles A. Goodrich, of Berlin, Conn., who died 
March 11, 1858. April 11, 1866, he married Lydia A., daughter of William V. 
Sessions, of Painesville, Ohio, who survives him. Of eleven children, four died 
early. One of the sons is a graduate of Yale College ; another is the president 
of Tougaloo University, Mississippi, and two others are students in Amherst 
College. 

Dr. Woodworth died at Berlin, Conn., of injuries received from a carriage 
accident, June 14, 1890, in his seventy-seventh year. 



19 

CLASS OF 1842. 

Robert Stevens Hitchcock, D.D. 

Son of Rev. Calvin Hitchcock, D.D. (Andover Seminary, class of 1814), 
and Eliza Russell Stevens; born in Newport, R. I., January 9, 1818; prepared 
for college at Randolph (Mass.) Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 
1837; principal of Westminster (Mass.) Academy, 1837-38; entered the Semi- 
nary in 1838, but was absent one year teaching in the Shenandoah Valley, Vir- 
ginia. He was ordained July 19, 1843, as pastor of the North Church, New 
Bedford, Mass., having preached there from the time of his graduation the 
preceding autumn. He was dismissed in 1846 to take the pastorate of the 
Maverick Church, East Boston, where he remained four years. From 1854 to 
1858 he was pastor of the Fifth Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, Md., and prin- 
cipal of a classical school for boys in the same city from 1858 to 1861. He then 
closed his school and entered the Union Army as chaplain of the Second 
Maryland Regiment, remaining in that service until 1864. He had charge 
of similar classical schools in Frankfort, Ky., 1864-69, and Lexington, Ky., 
1869-76. He was professor of Latin in Centre College, Danville, Ky., 1876 to 
1881, and with his wife conducted, from 1881 to the time of his death, the 
Hollidaysburg (Penn.) Seminary for Young Ladies, " which, under his ripe 
scholarship and educational experience, has come to be one of the best female 
seminaries in the State, and on which he has left the impress of his character, 
talent, and life." He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Greenville 
and Tusculum College in 1881. 

He married, December 28, 187 1, Jennie Ballinger, daughter of George 
Madison Adams, of Lexington, Ky., who remains in charge of the seminary 
at Hollidaysburg. 

Dr. Hitchcock died in Hollidaysburg, Penn., of pneumonia, following 
la grippe, April 6, 1891, aged seventy-three years. 



William James White. 

Son of Aaron White and Mary Avery; born in Boylston, Mass., March n, 
181 1 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; took the freshman 
year at Brown University, but graduated at Williams College, 1839; spent three 
years in the Seminary. He was ordained at Boylston, September 20, 1842, 
and was in the home missionary service at Huntingdon, Can., 1842-43; Con- 
cord, Mich., 1844; Lubec, Whiting, and Whitney ville, Me., 1845-46; Fairfax 
and Fletcher, Vt., 1847-49. His health failing, he engaged in the coffee and 
spice business in Worcester, Mass., continuing it for fifteen years with such 
marked honesty that a resident of that city writes : " We had the pure article 
then." He spent the remainder of his life in Worcester. He taught a Bible 
class in the county jail for over twenty years. He was an outspoken abolition- 
ist of the early time, and a steadfast opponent of secret societies. 

He was married, May 13, 1850, to Harriet R., daughter of Luther Ames, 
of Boylston. She survives him with one son. An older son died in childhood. 

Mr. White died of rheumatism of the heart, in Worcester, Mass., Octo- 
ber 20, 1889, m n * s seventy-ninth year. 



20 



Austin Phelps, D.D. {Resident licentiate.) 

Son of Rev. Eliakim Phelps, D.D., and Sarah Adams ; born in Brookfield 
(West Parish, now West Brookfield), Mass., January 7, 1820; prepared for col- 
lege at Geneva, N. Y. ; entered Geneva (now Hobart) College, 1833, was in 
junior class of Amherst College, 1835, and graduated with valedictorian honors 
at the University of Pennsylvania, 1837. He studied theology at first privately, 
in 1839 at Yale Divinity School ; was licensed to preach by the Third Presbytery 
of Philadelphia in April, 1840; was for a short time Resident Licentiate in 
Union Theological Seminary, 1840-41, and in this Seminary, 1841-42. He was 
ordained, March 31, 1842, as pastor of the Pine Street (now Berkeley Street) 
Church, Boston, remaining there until his election, in 1848, to the Bartlet pro- 
fessorship of sacred rhetoric in this Seminary, made vacant by the transfer of 
Professor Park to the chair of Christian Theology. This office he filled until 
1879, having under his instruction over one thousand young men in preparation 
for the ministry. He was afterward professor emeritus until his death, retain- 
ing his residence in Andover, but spending a large part of each year at his home 
in Bar Harbor, Me. 

Professor Phelps's eminence and usefulness as an author were scarcely 
second to his great work as a teacher. The Year-Book gives twenty-five titles 
of his publications. The Still Hour, 1859, has had a very large circulation, both 
in this country and by reprints and translations in foreign lands. The Theory 
of Preaching, 1 88 1, and English Style in Public Discourse, 1883, preserve the 
substance of his Andover lectures. Other well-known volumes were : The New 
Birth, 1866; The Solitude of Christ, 1868; Studies in the Old Testament, 1879; 
Men a?id Books, 1882; My Portfolio, 1882; and My Study, 1886. He was also 
joint compiler, with Professor Park and Dr. Lowell Mason, of The Sabbath 
Hymn and Tune Book, 1859, and joint author, with the former and Dr. D. L. 
Furber, of Hymns and Choirs, i860. His last book, My Note- Book: Fragmen- 
tary Studies in Theology, was finished a few days before his death, and has 
since been published. He also made many contributions on important subjects 
to the religious press, especially in later years to the Congregationalist. He 
was the preacher of the Massachusetts Convention Sermon in 1859, and of the 
Election Sermon in 1861, the title of the latter being T/ie Relations of the Bible 
to the Civilization of the Future. Amherst College conferred upon him the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1856. 

Professor Phelps married, September 28, 1842, Elizabeth, daughter of Prof. 
Moses Stuart, of Andover. She died November 30, 1852. Their children 
were Mrs. Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, Prof. Moses Stuart Phelps (Andover 
Seminary, 1872), who died in 1883, and Rev. Lawrence Phelps, of Chelsea, 
Mass. Professor Phelps married, second, April 20, 1855, Mary, also daughter 
of Professor Stuart. She died September 24, 1856. He married, third, June 
10, 1858, Mary A., daughter of Samuel Johnson, of Boston. She survives him 
with two sons, Francis Johnson Phelps, of Baltimore, and Edward Johnson 
Phelps (Yale College, 1886), journalist in Chicago. 

Professor Phelps died of heart failure, at Bar Harbor, Me., October 13, 1890, 
aged seventy years, and was buried in the Chapel Cemetery, Andover. 



21 



GLASS OP 1843. 

George Francis Cushman, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Apollos Cushman and Anna Maria Barton ; born in Pawtucket, 
Mass. (now R. I.), February 24, 1819; prepared for college at Pawtucket 
Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1840; spent one year in the 
Seminary, 1840-41. He taught in Alabama from 1843 to J 849> studying the- 
ology the last two years at* Tuscaloosa, where he was ordained deacon in the 
Episcopal Church, May 13, 1849, and priest, May 29, 1850. He labored as 
home missionary, especially in connection with the Church of St. John's in the 
Wilderness, until 1851. His health failing, he spent two years in his native 
town, where he organized and ministered to Trinity Church. In 1853 he 
returned to Alabama, and was for twelve years rector of St. Luke's Church 
in Cahaba. He was then thirteen years in Illinois : as rector of St. Peter's 
Church, Sycamore, 1S66-69; Church of the Redeemer, Princeton, 1869-74; St. 
Stephen's Church, Chicago, 1874-79. While in Chicago, he was for four years 
associate editor of the Province, and for one year of the Living Church. From 
1879 to the time of his death, he was assistant minister of Emmanuel Church, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., and from 1880 associate editor of the Churchman. He pub- 
lished several addresses, and a volume of sermons entitled Doctrine and Duty. 
He received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Brown University in 
1846, and that of Doctor of Divinity from the University of Alabama in i860. 
He was a trustee of Jubilee College, Illinois. 

Dr. Cushman died of pneumonia, in Brooklyn, N.Y., June 26, 1890, aged 
seventy- one years. He was never married. 

CLASS OF 1844. 

Henry Martyn Dexter, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Rev. Elijah Dexter (forty-four years the minister of Plympton) and 
Mary Morton (sister of Governor Marcus Morton) ; born in Plympton, Mass., 
August 13, 1821 ; prepared for college under the instruction of his father; took 
the first two years of his college course at Brown University, and graduated at 
Yale College, 1840 ; principal of Rochester (Mass.) Academy, 1840-41 ; in the 
Seminary, 1841-44. He was ordained pastor of the Franklin Street Church, 
Manchester, N. H., November 9, 1844, and remained there until 1849. He then 
succeeded the late Professor Phelps as pastor of the Pine Street Church, Boston. 
Under his leadership the church built the new meeting-house on Berkeley Street 
(the present Berkeley Temple), the site of which he selected, and the plan of which 
he prepared, with the design of making it, quoting his own words, "an Orthodox 
people 1 s home, where the common people could hear the gospel gladly." In 
1867 he closed this pastorate to become one of the proprietors, and the editor-in 
chief, of the Congregationalist, with which he had previously been connected as 
associate editor, 1851-56, and editor, 1856-65. This position he held until his 
death, his residence from 1873 being in New Bedford. He was also one of the 
founders of the Congregational Quarterly, and its leading editor from 1859 to 
1866. Among his published volumes, twenty-five of which are named in the 
Year-Book, are : Street Thoughts, 18 59 ; Congregationalism ,1865, which has passed 
through several editions, and is the accepted authority regarding the principles 



22 



and usages of the denomination ; The Church Polity of the Pilgrims the Polity of 
the New Testament, 1870; As to Roger Williams, 1876; The Congregationalism 
of the Last Three Hundred Years, as seen in its Literature, with a Bibliographical 
Appendix (of 7,250 titles), 1880. In his preparation for the last-named work, as 
well as for another, unhappily left incomplete, Study of the English and Dutch 
Life of the Plymouth Men, he had visited Europe nine times, and, unquestion- 
ably, made larger researches into the early history of the Pilgrims than any 
other man. 

Dr. Dexter, when residing in Manchester, N. H., was a member of the school 
committee, and afterwards filled the same office in Boston. He was Southworth 
Lecturer on Congregationalism in this Seminary, 1876-79, Moderator of the 
National Congregational Council at St. Louis, 1880, and a member of the " Creed 
Commission" authorized by that body. He was a corporate member of the 
American Board, a director of the American Congregational Association, and a 
member of almost innumerable church councils, far and near. He was a mem- 
ber of the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the American Historical Asso- 
ciation, and corresponding member of other similar bodies. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Iowa College, 1865, and Yale College, 1880, 
the latter institution making him also Doctor of Laws in 1890. Three days 
before his death he was elected to preach the opening sermon at the Inter- 
national Congregational Council in London. 

He was married, November 19, 1844, to Emeline, daughter of Simeon 
Palmer, of Boston. She died in Boston, February 24, 1891. Three daughters 
died in childhood ; their only son is Rev. Henry Morton Dexter (Andover 
Seminary, 1870), one of the present editors and proprietors of the Congrega- 
tionalist. 

Dr. Dexter died of heart failure, at his home in New Bedford, Mass,, 
November 13, 1890, in the seventieth year of his age. 



Henry Child Morse. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of David Morse and Hannah Child; born in Exeter, N. Y., May 22, 
1811 ; prepared for college at Penn Yann (N.Y.) Academy; graduated at Yale 
College, 1839; was principal of Nichols Academy, Dudley, Mass., for two 
years ; studied theology in this Seminary, 1841-42, and afterwards with his 
uncle, Rev. Willard Child, Norwich, Conn. He was licensed by Windham 
(Conn.) Association, August 28, 1844, an d was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church, Lima, Ind., 1845-47, having been ordained by council at Union City, 
Mich., February 12, 1846. After one year's service at Tyrone, N. Y., he became 
pastor of the Congregational church in Union City, Mich., in 1848, and 
remained there five years. From 1856 to 1858 he was acting pastor at Ontario, 
Ind., and at same time principal of Lagrange Collegiate Institute. He then 
settled on a farm at Union City, and resided there until his death, the Sunday- 
schools and feeble churches of the vicinity profiting through all these years by 
his efforts in their behalf. 

He was married, November 17, 1842, to Sarah May, daughter of Dea. 
Luther Child, of Woodstock, Conn. She died January 10, 1849, an d he was 



23 

married, August 29, 1852, to Mrs. Caroline F. (Lincoln), widow of Samuel J. 
Mills Hammond, of Union City. She is still living in that place, with their 
only son. 

Mr. Morse died of bronchial disease, in Union City, Mich., November 9, 
1890, in his eightieth year. 

Charles Richards. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Noyes Richards and Sally Mather ; born in Darien, Conn., Decem- 
ber 9. 1814 ; prepared for college in his native town ; graduated at Union Col* 
lege, 1841 ; in this Seminary, 1841-42; taught in Darien, and in Bronxdale, 
N.Y., 1842-43; in Union Theological Seminary, 1S43-44; in Auburn Theolo- 
gical Seminary, 1844-45. He was licensed by the Manhattan Association, 
New York City, July 1, 1844, and ordained by the Ontario Presbytery, May 25, 
1847. He was pastor of the Presbyterian churches in Lakeville, N. Y., 1845- 
49; Hector, X.Y., 1S49-51 ; Rensselaerville, N.Y., 1851-55 ; Monroeville, Ohio, 
1855-58; Maumee City, Ohio, 1858-6S (during most of these years preach- 
ing also either at Waterville or Springfield) ; Pardeeville and Wyocena, Wis., 
1868-73. He was afterward without charge at Maumee (South Toledo), Ohio, 
and from 1886 at Hampden, Ohio. "He was an able preacher, a good pastor, 
a faithful minister in every respect." 

He was married, September 10, 1845, to Christianna B., daughter of Andrew 
McMuldrock, of Schenectady, N. Y., who died March 30, 1885. They had four 
sons and two daughters, of whom one son and one daughter are deceased. The 
three surviving sons are all ministers of the gospel. 

Mr. Richards died of typho-malarial fever, at Hampden, Ohio, August 29, 
1890, in his seventy-sixth year. 

CLASS OF 1845. 

Rowland Ay res, D.D. {Non-graduate, .) 

Son of Edward Ayres and Rachel Kent; born in Granby, Mass., May I, 
1817; prepared for college at Amherst and Monson academies; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1841 ; was principal of the Southampton (L.I.) Academy, 
1841-42, and again, 1843-44; entered the Seminary in 1842, and remained one 
year; was tutor in Amherst College, 1844-46; completed his theological study 
at Princeton Seminary, 1846-47. He was ordained January 12, 1848, as pastor 
of the First Church, Hadley, Mass., continuing as such for thirty-five years, 
and remaining pastor emeritus from 1883 to his death. He was a member of 
the school committee of the town for thirty-eight years; one of the trustees 
of Hopkins Academy, Hadley, twenty-three years, and since 1865 president of 
the Board; overseer of the Charitable Fund, Amherst College, thirty-five years ; 
represented the town in the Legislature in 1882. Amherst gave him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity in 1878. He published five sermons, and, shortly before 
his death, the History of the Hopkins Fund, Grammar School, and Academy. 

"A man of great force of character, of strictest integrity, an eloquent and 
successful preacher of the gospel, loved and honored by the community in 
which he lived." 



2 4 

He was married, June 12, 1849, to Jane E., daughter of Chester Webster, 
of Farmington, Conn., who survives him with one son and three daughters, 
a daughter and a son having died in their youth. 

Dr. Ayres died at his home in Hadley, January 31, 189 1, of peritonitis, in 
his seventy-fourth year. 



William Coffin. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Nathaniel Coffin, Esq., and Mary Porter; born in Wiscasset, Me., 
January 19, 1822 ; from the age of fourteen lived in Jacksonville, 111. ; graduated 
at Illinois College, 1841 ; in this Seminary, 1842-44 ; also in Bangor Theologi- 
cal Seminary. He was professor of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and 
Astronomy, in Illinois College from 1844 to 1852. He then removed to Batavia, 
111., and was for a few years engaged in farming, and afterwards in banking, 
until in 1877 he lost his sight. He was never ordained, but frequently preached 
while in Jacksonville, and occasionally in the Congregational church in Batavia, 
of which he was for many years a deacon. A local newspaper says : " His 
simple, fresh, clear expositions of the gospel were always listened to with the 
greatest respect and attention. His honesty in business and his fearlessness in 
holding an advanced position on the question of slavery before and during the 
bitter years of the Rebellion, and on the temperance question in later years, 
made his opinion respected and his counsel sought." He published in 1889 
the Life and Times of Hon. Samuel D. Lockwood. 

He was married, June 29, 1847, to Mary E., daughter of Judge Samuel D. 
Lockwood, of Jacksonville, 111. She died June 22, 1877. He next married, 
June 13, 1883, Sophia M., daughter of Jed Sawyer, of Batavia, who survives 
him. Of seven children, three sons and two daughters are living ; two sons are 
deceased. 

Mr. Coffin died of congestion of the brain, at Batavia, 111., August 2, 1890, 
in his sixty-ninth year. 



GLASS OF 1846. 

Philip Titcomb. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Berry Titcomb and Katy Noyes ; born in Newburyport, Feb- 
ruary 29, 1812; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; graduated 
at Yale College, 1843; in this Seminary, 1843-44; completing his course at 
Bangor Theological Seminary, 1844-46. His first charge, 1846-48, was in 
Hillsdale, Mich., where he was ordained April 7, 1847. His subsequent pastor- 
ates were in New England: Cherryfield, Maine, 1848-51; Dexter, Maine, 
1852-54; Kennebunkport, Maine, 1854-64; Limerick, Maine, 1865-68; Plymp- 
ton, Mass., 1868-79; Kensington, N.H., 1880-91. He had delivered his fare- 
well sermon on the last Sabbath of 1890, but continued to preach to his attached 
people, and officiated on the Sabbath preceding his sudden death. His 
thorough goodness and faithful devotedness to his calling won for him the 
confidence and esteem of his brethren in the ministry, and the communities 
where he labored. 



25 

He was married, October i, 1846, to Eliza Wilder, daughter of Erastus 
Briggs, of Bangor, Maine. She died June 9, 1870. Four daughters are living, 
two daughters and one son having died. 

Mr. Titcomb died of heart failure, at Kensington, N. H., January 24, 1891, 
having nearly completed his seventy- ninth year. 

GLASS OF 1847. 

Charles Noyes Todd. (Resident licentiate.) 

Son of Jonathan Todd and Jane Noyes ; born in Rowley, Mass., Octo- 
ber 25, 1812 ; prepared for college at Dummer Academy; graduated at Amherst 
College, 1839; taught in Baltimore, 1839-40, and in New York City, 1840-44; 
student in Union Theological Seminary, 1841-43 and 1845-46; resident licentiate 
in this Seminary, 1846-47. He taught in Rowley, preaching also for a few 
months, 1847-49. A throat disease developing, he reluctantly retired from 
the ministry, and devoted the remainder of his life to teaching and business. 
From 1849 to 1854 he was principal of an academy in Honesdale, Penn. He 
then went to Indianapolis, Ind., and was associated with Dr. C. G. McLean 
in the management of the McLean Female Seminary, of which, after Dr. 
McLean's death, he became principal. In 1863 he engaged in the book trade, 
principally in the line of Sabbath-school and religious publications. In war 
time he was Corresponding Secretary of the Indiana State Christian Commis- 
sion. An Indianapolis newspaper spoke of him as " a citizen whose life and 
character have been an inspiration for ' whatsoever things are honest, whatso- 
ever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, 
whatsoever things are of good report' — one of those who gave to life in this 
community its tone of strength and soundness." 

He was married, December 25, 1854, to Margaret M., daughter of Rev. 
Charles G. McLean, D.D., of Indianapolis, who survives him. 

Mr. Todd died of bronchial disease, in Indianapolis, Ind., September 3, 
1888, in his seventy-sixth year. 

GLASS OF 1848. 

Abel Wood. 

Son of Dea. Benjamin F. Wood and Lucinda Merriam ; born in West- 
minster, Mass., January 7, 1818; prepared for college at Westminster Acad- 
emy; took the freshman year at Amherst College, and graduated at Dartmouth 
College, 1843 ! in the Seminary, 1844-45 and 1846-48. He was instructor for 
a year in Beloit, Wis., and for a year in the academy at Canton, N. Y. He 
preached in Warner, N. H., 1851-52, and in the First Church, St. Johnsbury, 
Vt., 1853-54, and was called to the pastorate in each place, but decided to 
devote his life to teaching. He was principal of the Collegiate Institute, 
Gilbertsville, N. Y., 1854-56, having previously taught there, 1852-53. He was 
instructor in Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H., for thirteen years, 1856- 
69, and principal of Albany (N. Y.) Academy, 1869-70, returning in 187 1 to the 
charge of the Institute at Gilbertsville, which he retained until 1887. He 
resided afterwards in Kingston, N. H. 



26 



He was married, July 21, 1849, to Sarah Ann, daughter of Aaron Patten, of 
Kingston, N. H., who survives him, with their only son, a physician in New 
York City. 

Mr. Wood died of heart failure, at Kingston, N. H., August 19, 1890, in the 
seventy- third year of his age. 

GLASS OF 1849. 

Edward Hanford Greeley, D.D. 

Son of Edward Greeley and Hannah Eaton; born in Hopkinton, N.H., 
April 23, 1817; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, 
N. H. ; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1845; preceptor of Atkinson (N.H.) 
Academy, 1845-46; in the Seminary, 1846-49, from Claremont, N. H. He 
was ordained pastor of the church in Haverhill, N.H., November 7, 1849, 
and remained there until 1858; was pastor of the Pearl St. Church, Nashua, 
N.H., 1858-60, and at Methuen, Mass., 1861-66. His health then being seriously 
impaired, he was without charge for three years, with residence at Claremont, 
N.H., but occasionally preaching, and acting for a part of the time as financial 
agent of Kimball Union Academy. In 1869 he returned to his early charge at 
Haverhill, N. H., and filled that pastorate until his removal in 1874 to Concord, 
to take up the work of the New Hampshire Home Missionary Society, of which 
he had been elected Secretary. This important service for the smaller churches 
of the State he performed with great energy and devotion for the remainder of 
his life. His only publication was in the line of his chosen work : An Essay 
on Systematic Beneficence. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Dartmouth College in 1885, and was a trustee of Kimball Union Academy from 
1871 to 1885. 

He was married, May 7, 1850, to Jane Jewett, daughter of Moses Richards, 
of Rowley, Mass., who died April 24, 1852. June 6, 1854, he was married to 
Louisa Maria, daughter of Reuben Ware, of Needham, Mass. She survives 
him, with three sons and a daughter, one son having died in infancy. The sons 
are graduates of Dartmouth College, two of them being lawyers in New York 
City, and one assistant examiner in the Patent Office, Washington. The 
daughter is a teacher in Abbot Academy, Andover. 

Dr. Greeley died of kidney disease, at Concord, N.H., August 27, 1890, 
aged seventy -three years. 

CLASS OF 1851. 

Ransom Bethune Welch, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Welch and Hannah Van Etten ; born in Greenville, N. Y., Jan- 
uary 27, 1824; prepared for college at the academies in Gallupville and Green- 
ville, N.Y. ; graduated at Union College, 1846; principal of Red Hook (N.Y.) 
Academy, 1846-47, and of Jonesville (N.Y.) Academy, 1847-48 ; in this Seminary, 
1848-50; in Auburn Theological Seminary, 1850-52. He began preaching at 
Oswego, N.Y., but ill health prevented him from continuing there, and as col- 
porteur of the American Tract Society he traveled on horseback in the Southern 
States, 1853-54. He was ordained by the Classis of Schoharie, January 9, 1855 ; 
was pastor of Reformed (Dutch) Church, Gilboa, N.Y., 1854-56 ; Catskill, N.Y., 
1856-59. His health failing, he traveled in Europe and the East, 1859-60. 



27 

On his return he took a pastorate in Albion, N.Y., but was soon compelled to 
resign, and remained without charge for five years at Clifton Park, N.Y. He 
was professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and English Literature in Union College, from 
1866 to 1876, and from the latter year to the time of his death filled the chair 
of Christian Theology in Auburn Theological Seminary. He was a member of 
the American Institute of Christian Philosophy, was associate editor of the 
Presbyterian Review, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed Review, besides 
contributing largely to other magazines and to the weekly press. He published, 
in 1876, Faith and Modem Thought, and in 1882, Notes on Theology. In 1881 
he was a delegate to the Presbyterian Alliance in Belfast, and to the World's 
Convention of Young Men's Christian Associations in Berlin; in 1888 to the 
Alliance and to the World's Missionary Conference in London. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Rutgers College and the University of 
the City of New York, both in 186S, and that of Doctor of Laws in 1872 from 
Maryville College. " He not only gave to Auburn Seminary his ripest years 
and powers in ungrudging service, but he left the munificent bequest of $36,000 
to enlarge its usefulness." 

He was married, June 5, 1861, to Miss Lydia G. Kennedy, of Clifton Park, 
N.Y., who survives him. 

Dr. Welch died of cystitis, at Healing Springs, Va., June 29, 1890, aged 
sixty- six years. 

CLASS OF 1855, 

Edward Aiken, M.D. 

Son of Rev. Silas Aiken, D.D., and Mary Osgood ; born in Amherst, N.H., 
April 10, 1830; prepared for college at Boston Latin School ; graduated at Dart- 
mouth College, 1851 ; entered the Seminary at once, and graduated in 1855, 
spending one year, 1853-54, as teacher in Castleton (Vt.) Seminary. He was 
ordained as foreign missionary at Rutland, Vt., September 7, 1855, and sailed 
for Syria the following month. His principal service was at Beirut, although 
also stationed at Horns, and at Kefr Shima. He was compelled by ill health 
to leave the mission, and returned to the United States in 1858. He then pre- 
pared himself for the medical profession, studying for a time with Dr. Stephen 
Tracy in Andover, and graduating at Yale Medical School in 1861. He settled 
as physician at Fitzwilliam, N.H., in 1861, and at Amherst, N.H., in 1865, fill- 
ing also the professorship of Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Chemistry, in 
the New England Female Medical College, Boston, from 1864 to 1872. From 
1883 Dr. Aiken was engaged in literary work, for one year in cataloguing a 
private library in New York City, and afterwards at the Secretary of State's 
office, Concord, N.H., in indexing the laws and records of the State. 

He was married, September 5, 1855, to Susan D., daughter of Hon. John 
O. Cole, of Albany, N.Y. She died at Horns, Syria, June 20, 1856, and he 
was married, July 22, 1857, to Sarah Cheney, daughter of Dea. Cyrus Cheney, 
of Phillipston, Mass., a teacher in the Female Seminary at Beirut. She survives 
him, with two sons and a daughter, two children having died. One son is in 
preparation for the ministry. Dr. Aiken died at Amherst, August 14, 1890, of 
acute Bright's disease, following la grippe, aged sixty years. 



28 

GLASS OP 1856. 



Samuel Chase Dean. 



Son of Isaiah R. Dean and Betsey W. Chase ; born in Oakham, Mass., 
March 28, 1823; prepared for college at Williston Seminary; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1853 ; in the Seminary, 1853-56. He was ordained August 
13, 1856, at Reading, Mass., as a foreign missionary, and labored in the Mah- 
ratta Mission of the American Board in Western India for eleven years : at 
Ahmednagar, 1856-60, and Satara, 1860-67. HI health obliging him to return 
to America, he resided without charge at Mt. Vernon, N.H., 1867-69, preached 
in Nacoochee, Ga., 1869-72, and afterwards was engaged in arduous home mis- 
sionary service in Nebraska until his death. He was at Steele City, 1872-81 ; 
Wymore, 1881-82; Plymouth, 1882-85; South Bend from 1885, preaching also 
for three years at Mainland. 

He was married August 9, 1856, to Augusta Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. 
Amos Abbott, of the Mahratta Mission, who survives him, with their seven 
sons and one daughter. One of the sons is preparing for the ministry, and the 
daughter is preceptress in Gates College, Nebraska. 

Mr. Dean died of internal cancer, at South Bend, Neb., September 9, 1890* 
aged sixty- seven years. 



William Ripley Tompkins. 

Son of Rev. William Brownell Tompkins and Margaret Briggs ; born in 
Madison, N.Y., March 19, 1826; prepared for college (in part) at Stockbridge 
(Mass.) Academy; studied one year at Columbia College, but graduated at 
Williams College, 1850; taught one year in Schoharie and two years in Geneseo, 
N.Y. ; in Seminary, 1853-56, from Columbus, N.Y. He was ordained Octo- 
ber 9, 1856, as pastor of the New England Church, Brooklyn, N.Y., remaining 
there until 1864. After a vacation of two years spent in regaining his health, 
he began pastoral service in Wrentham, Mass., which continued for twenty- 
five years, until his death. He represented Wrentham in the Legislature in 
1877 and 1880. When suddenly stricken down, he was in his study, engaged 
in the preparation of his sermon for the coming Sabbath, upon the text, 
"Behold, a sower went forth to sow," and in a few hours he himself went 
forth to " reap life everlasting." 

He died of neuralgia of the heart, at Wrentham, Mass., April 11, 1891, aged 
sixty-five years. He was unmarried. 

Oliver Westcott Winchester. 

Son of Henry Winchester and Isabel O. Foot; born in Madrid, N.Y., 
April 18, 1826; prepared for college at Castleton (Vt.) Seminary; graduated at 
Middlebury College, 1849; taught at Madrid and in the St Lawrence Academy, 
Potsdam, N.Y., 1849-50, at Raleigh, Tenn., 1850-51, and in the Adelphian 
Academy, North Bridgewater, Mass., 1852-53 ; in the Seminary, 1851-52 and 
1854-56. He was ordained in Shoreham, Vt., September 18, 1856, as a foreign 
missionary, and was in the service of the American Board in Turkey : in 
Constantinople, 1857-58; Tocat, 1858-59; Sivas, 1859-65. Returning to this 



2 9 

country, he was successively in charge of churches at Wadham's Mills, N.Y., 
1866-67; Beekmantown, N. Y., 1867-69; Manistee, Mich., 1869-71; Jeffer- 
son, Wis., 1872-75 ; Fergus Falls, Minn., 1875-81 ; Reedsburg, Wis., 1881-87 ; 
Cambria, Wis., 1887-89 ; Oregon, Wis., 1889-90. These were all Presbyterian 
churches, except the one first named. " His judicious mind, catholicity of 
spirit, firmness of purpose, and abounding humor, constituted him a man of 
unusual power." 

He married, October 9, 1856, Janette S., daughter of Noah Jones, Jr., of 
Shoreham, Vt., who survives him, with two sons and one daughter, one son 
having died in infancy. 

Mr. Winchester died of heart failure, in Oregon, Wis., November 7, 1890, 
at the age of sixty-four years, and was buried at his former home in Reedsburg. 

Lyman Marshall. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Moody Marshall and Sarah Beard; born in East Weare, N. H., 
June 20, 1823; prepared for college at Pembroke (N. H.) Academy; graduated 
at Dartmouth College, 1850; taught in Andover, N. H. and Clinton, N. J. ; 
studied law and was ready for admission to the bar, when he decided to prepare 
for the ministry; in the Seminary, 1853-55. He was ordained at Manchester, 
N. H., October 8, 1856, and was city missionary there until i860 ; was pastor in 
Greenfield, N. H., 1860-63, an ^ in Harrisville, N. H., 1864-65. Removing 
then to the West, he served the Presbyterian church in St. Peter, Minn., for 
four years, and settled in Lebanon, 111., in 1871. He resigned this pastorate in 
1880, but after preaching a year in Greenfield, 111., returned to Lebanon, and 
continued his charge there until 1887, being afterwards pastor emeritus. "A 
thoroughly consecrated man, zealous for the cause of Christ, and unremitting 
in his efforts for the moral and spiritual elevation of the community." " His 
departure was very sudden. On the previous Sabbath he preached with 
unusual power and eloquence from the text, Go up higher." 

He was married, November 25, 1851, to Eliza, daughter of Stephen Win- 
gate, of Great Falls, N. H. She survives him, with two sons, both college 
graduates. 

Mr. Marshall died of paralysis of the brain, in Lebanon, 111., November 16, 
1890, aged sixty-seven years. 

GLASS OP 1864. 

Henry Franklin Clough Nichols. 

Son of Nicholas Nichols and Mary Jewett Barstow ; born in Kingston, N. H., 
February 9, 1833; prepared for college at Pembroke (N. H.) Academy; grad- 
uated at Williams College, 1859; principal of Canton (N. Y.) Academy, 1859- 
61 ; in Union Theological Seminary, 1861-62; in this Seminary, 1862-64, from 
Haverhill, Mass. He was licensed to preach at Windham, N. H., January 12, 
1864. In the winter of 1864-65 he was in the service of the United States 
Christian Commission at Fortress Monroe and in front of Petersburg. In the 
summer of 1865 he preached at Boxboro, Mass., then for two years in Norfolk, 
N. Y. His health forbidding him to continue in the ministry, he settled in 1868 
at New Lisbon, Wis., and carried on extensively and successfully the lumbering 
business, starting also the year before his death an establishment for forging 



30 

iron at Superior, Wis. He was prominent in public matters in his city, and 
repeatedly represented it in the State Legislature. A New Lisbon newspaper 
said : " Mr. Nichols was the chief support in every way of the Congregational 
church of this city ; reading sermons when there was no minister, visiting the 
sick and the sorrowing, leading the choir, and contributing liberally in money." 

He was married, May 12, 1868, to Nettie Williams, of Concord, N. H. She 
survives him with four sons and one daughter, one son having died in childhood. 

Mr. Nichols died of heart failure, at Superior, Wis., June 4, 1890, aged 
fifty-seven years. 

CLASS OP 1871. 

Benjamin Stephen Adams. {Special Course.) 

Son of Benjamin Adams and Abi Heald; born in Carlisle, Mass., December 
16, 1836; was for several years in business at the far West; graduated in the 
special course of this Seminary, 187 1. He was ordained at Cabot, Vt., Novem- 
ber 22, 1871, and pastor there until 1881 ; in Glover, Vt, 1881-84 ; to Westford, 
Vt., 1884-88; in Glover again, 1888-90; in East St. Johnsbury, Vt., 1890. Rev. 
Edward T. Fairbanks (Andover Seminary, 1863), of St. Johnsbury, writes : " From 
beginning to end his ministry was gentle, wise, effective. That God had called 
him to be a minister he never doubted, and though his opportunities of liberal 
education were limited, he made such proof of his ministry as remains and is 
spoken of now in all places where he lived. The power of gentleness made 
him great in usefulness to the end." 

He was married, June 16, 1875, t0 Eliza A., daughter of Solomon Cole, of 
Stark, N. H., who survives him with one son. 

He died of rheumatism of the heart, in East St. Johnsbury, Vt., January 2, 
1891, aged fifty-four years. 

CLASS OP 1886. 

John Alexander Macdonald. 

Son of Duncan Macdonald and Mary McPhee; born in Hopewell, N. S., 
November 6, 1849. While working at the carpenter's trade in Boston, he 
decided to devote himself to the ministry, and began his preparation in the 
New Glasgow (N. S.) High School. His studies being interrupted by a long 
illness, he was sent as missionary teacher to the island of Trinidad, W. I., 
where he labored from 1874 to 1877. He took a special course in Dalhousie 
College, Halifax, N. S., 1877-79, continuing his study at the Pine Hill Divinity 
School, Halifax, and doing home missionary work in New Brunswick, 1881-82. 
He was in the Seminary, 1882-84, but seeking a more favorable climate, served 
as home missionary at Benson, Arizona, for a few months, and afterwards at 
different places in California. He continued his studies in the Pacific Theo- 
logical Seminary at Oakland, in the class of 1885, and was ordained pastor at 
Lincoln, Cal., May 21, 1885. He was soon compelled to relinquish this charge, 
and returning East, graduated at this Seminary in 1886. Though having charge 
for a short time of a Presbyterian church in South Framingham, Mass., and 
afterwards supplying congregations in the vicinity of his Nova Scotia home, 



3i 

"the last few years of his life witnessed a continual fight with misfortune and 
sickness." His ministerial work, though brief and only kept up by an indomi- 
table will, bore abundant fruit. " He was specially interested in young men, 
and his own noble life has left its impress on many a young man now living." 
Mr. Macdonald died of consumption, in Hopewell, N. S., January 29, 1S90, 
at the age of forty years. 



Of the forty-six names recorded above, ten belong strictly to the report of 
previous years. Twenty-six of the number were full graduates. The average 
age is seventy-six years, eight months, ten days — a higher average than any 
reached during the ten years of our printed reports, and larger by nearly six 
years than the total average for that period. Two men were over ninety; 
nineteen, over eighty; fourteen, over seventy; eight, over sixty; two, over 
fifty ; only one under that age. 

Dr. Herman Halsey, of the class of 181 5, who has been since 1880 the 
senior alumnus of the Seminary, died, full of days and of peace, March 23; 
Dr. Frederic E. Cannon, of Geneva, N. Y., of the class of 1824, passed away 
a few days later; and Rev. Paul Couch, of the class of 1826, who had served 
in the active ministry until his eighty- fourth year, a few days earlier. Isaac 
Watts Wheelwright, of South Byfield, Mass., who graduated in 1825, is now 
the first on our list, although Peter Kimball, of the next class, still living at 
Perth Amboy, N.J., is his senior in age, being in his ninety-ninth year. Six 
men on our record are from the class of 1831, which, although the largest 
class save one in the eighty years' history of the Seminary, has but one sur- 
viving member — Professor Park. 

With a single exception, and that of a man who entered the ministry in 
middle life, these forty-six men were all college graduates, Dartmouth edu- 
cating eleven; Amherst, eight; Williams, five; Yale, five; Union, four; Bow- 
doin, two; Middlebury, two; Brown, Harvard, Illinois, Miami, Dalhousie, 
King's, the Universities of New York and Pennsylvania, one each. 

The roll is full of honored names : Professor Phelps, the revered teacher 
of a large majority of living alumni; Dr. Dexter, the learned historian and 
journalist of the denomination; Dr. Cheever, the elegant writer and eloquent 
agitator; Dr. Welch, many years professor in Union College and Auburn 
Seminary; Dr. Greeley, the hard-working Home Missionary Secretary in New 
Hampshire; Dr. Folsom of the Unitarian Church, Drs. Megie and Newell 
of the Presbyterian Church, Dr. Cushman of the Episcopal Church, and Dr. 
Crawley of the Baptist Church; life-long and faithful pastors in our own 
communion, like Sewall Tenney and Rowland Ayres; men who have given 
their lives to teaching, like Calvin Butler and Abel Wood ; foreign mission- 
aries and home missionaries, headed by Boutwell, the earnest pioneer among 
the Ojibways; and "other fellow-laborers, whose names are in the book of life." 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1891-92 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 15th, 1892. 

By C. C CARPENTER. Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, Number 2. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press : Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street. 

1892. 



ALUMNI COMMITTEE. 



Rev. Prof. Edward Y. Hincks, D.D. 

Rev. Erastus Blakeslee. 

Rev. Edward S. Tead. 

Rev. Henry J. Patrick, D.D. 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Secretary. 



NOTICE. 



This Obituary Record is published annually in connection 
with the meeting of the Alumni Association at the June anni- 
versaries. Alumni are earnestly requested to aid in its prepara- 
tion by communicating the fact of the death of any past member 
of the Seminary, together with any newspaper notices or memorial 
sketches. These, with change of address, or other information 
relating to the record of living alumni, should be sent to the 
Secretary at Andover. 



I NDEX 



Class. Age. Page. 

1853. Charles A. Aiken, D.D 64 52 

1S31. Jonathan T. Backus, U.D., LL.D 82 38 

1S57. John G. Baird 65 54 

1S62. Edwin S. Beard 59 55 

1S52. Edmund H. Blanchard 70 51 

Jonathan Bl-\nchard 81 42 

1875. Austin II. Burr 42 61 

1840. *IIenry Callahan 77 65 

1862. George Constantine, D.D 58 55 

1S30. •James T. Dickinson 77 63 

1863. Albert I. Dutton 60 56 

1S36. Lucius R. Eastman 82 41 

1S67. Samuel E. Evans 50 58 

1834. David Fosdh k 78 40 

1853. Roswell Foster 67 53 

1887. Henry A. Frederick 37 62 

1866. Elbridge Gerry 54 57 

1851. John G. Hale 67 50 

1873. Alfred Ff. Hall 46 61 

1840. Franklin D. Harris 79 44 

1830. George W. Hathaway 83 37 

1838. Asa Hemenway 81 43 

1845. James HERRICK 77 47 

1846. John S. Holmes 69 49 

1840. *Gideon s. Johnson 78 66 

Addison Kingsbury, D.D 91 37 

1834. Lewis F. Laine 85 39 

1S34. *Flias Loomis, LL.D 78 64 

1833. Joseph Loring 87 39 

1870. Lucian D. Mears 53 60 

1S40. Josiah W. Peet 83 44 

1868. Samuel W. Powell 54 58 

1846. Francis G. Pratt 70 49 

1835. Alexander J. Sessions 82 41 

1840. Charles C. Shackford 76 45 

1887. William J. Skelton 35 62 

1843. Thomas II. Skinner, D.D., LL.D 71 46 

1869. Edward P. Smith, Ph.D 52 59 

1845. Samuel J. Spalding, D.D 71 48 

1849. Albert Tolman 67 50 

1857. *Abner L. Train 60 66 

1S44. Jeremy W. Tuck 80 46 

1834. *Seth H. Waldo 88 64 

1851. Orlando H. White, D.D 72 51 

1838. Artemas A. Wood, D.D 80 43 

i860. Henry D. Woodworth 65 54 

♦Died previous to this year, but not previously reported. 



NECROLOGY 



CLASS OF 1828. 

Addison Kingsbury, D.D. 

Son of Joseph Kingsbury and Lois Porter ; born in Coventry, Conn., July 5, 
1800 ; prepared for college under the private instruction of Rev. George A. 
Calhoun (Class of 1817), Coventry; entered Amherst College. 1823, but com- 
pelled by serious sickness to leave after first year ; taught at Norwich Falls, 
Conn.; in this Seminary, 1825-2S; licensed by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. Freegrace Raynolds, Wilmington, April 22, 1S2S. He was ordained 
as an evangelist by the Presbytery of Newburyport, September 25, 1828, and 
labored for one year as a home missionary in Washington County, Ohio ; was 
pastor of the Presbyterian churches of Belpre and Warren, Ohio, 1S29-39, and 
in Putnam (now a ward of Zanesville), Ohio, 1840-78; afterwards pastor emeri- 
tus, residing at Marietta, Ohio, until his death. He was a member of the New 
England Historic- Genealogical Society, Boston, a trustee for thirty-eight years 
of the Putnam Female Seminary, for thirty-one years of Lane Theological Semi- 
nary, and for fifty-three years of Marietta College. The last named institution 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1854. He published 
two historical sketches of his church at Putnam and a History of the Synod of 
Ohio. He was from the church at Coventry, Conn., in which Harlan Page was 
reared, and drank largely of the spirit of that devoted man. Mr. Page having 
married a sister of Dr. Kingsbury, their correspondence was frequent and helpful. 
Dr. II. M. Field said, in the New York Evangelist : " He was probably the oldest 
and up to recent years almost the best-known of our ministers west of the Ohio. 
He was among the most zealous and efficient of those pioneers of the Church 
who began their ministry at the very front, when Ohio was yet largely a wilder- 
ness." 

He was married, April 27, 1830, to Emma Little, of West Boscawen (now 
Webster), N.H., daughter of Jesse Little and Martha Gerrish. She died 
August 11, 1830, and he married, August 20, 1832, Mary Farrar Price of the 
same town, daughter of Rev. Ebenezer Price and Lucy Farrar, who died January 
17, 1888. Of three sons, one died in childhood. The others are graduates of 
Marietta College. 

Dr. Kingsbury died of la grippe, at Marietta, Ohio, January 25, 1892, in the 
ninety-second year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1830. 

George Whitefield Hathaway. 

Son of Washington Hathaway and Deborah Winslow; born in Freetown, 
Mass., December 11, 1807; prepared for college under Dr. Thomas Bump, of 
Freetown ; entered Brown University in 1822, and took his freshman and sopho- 
more years there, finishing his course at Williams College, 1827 ; in this Semi- 



38 

nary, 1827-30; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting 
with Rev. Milton Badger, Andover, April 21, 1830; spent about a year in the 
service of the American Board as traveling agent, and as assistant at the Rooms 
in Boston; under the auspices of the Massachusetts Missionary Society preached 
for a few months, in 1832, at Canton, Mass., and also at West Bridgewater, 
Mass. March 20, 1833, he was ordained as pastor of the church in Bloomfield 
(now a part of Skowhegan), Me., remaining there twenty-seven years, until 
i860. Serving for a year as acting pastor at Grinnell, Io., he returned to his 
home in Maine at the breaking out of the war in 1861, and resided there until 
1877, with the exception of two years, 1863-65, when he was chaplain of 
the 19th Maine Volunteers. Before that service he supplied regularly feeble 
churches in the vicinity, and afterwards preached occasionally. He resided in 
Compton, Cal., from 1878 to 1882, and subsequently in Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mr. Hathaway published a Lecture on the Maine Law, and several sermons. 
He represented his town in the Maine Legislature in 1857, 1863, 1866, and 
187 1. Rev. Benjamin Tappan, D.D., Norridgewock, Me., said in his memorial 
address : " He was a man of remarkably clear thought, who knew what he did 
know — and this was by no means small in amount — very thoroughly, and who 
had great power of clear and forcible expression. . . . He was a man of very 
positive and strong convictions, and always bold in uttering them. He was the 
stuff of which reformers are made. He struck very powerful blows for tem- 
perance and for liberty in the period of his life when there was so much occasion 
for such. He was a man of strong and deep feeling, capable of glowing indig- 
nation at wrong and outrage of every kind, of fervent enthusiasm for every- 
thing right and good." 

He was married, January 8, 1835, to Mary Susannah Weston Locke, of 
Bloomfield, daughter of Josiah Locke and Susannah Patterson. She died 
March 4, 1849; an d he married, October 24, 1850, her sister, Ann Lucretia 
Locke, who died September 20, 1876. Of two sons and six daughters, one son 
and three daughters are deceased. The son, Philo Hathaway, died on the 
United States Sloop Decatur in 1857, being private secretary to Commander, 
afterwards Admiral, Thatcher. 

Mr. Hathaway died of paralysis, at Los Angeles, Cal., July 1, 1891, in the 
eighty-fourth year of his age. 

CLASS OP 1831. 

Jonathan Trumbull Backus, D.D., LL.D. {Resident licentiate.) 

Son of Eleazer Fitch Backus and Elizabeth Huntington Chester ; born in 
Albany, N.Y., January 27, 1809; prepared for college at Albany Academy; 
graduated at Columbia College, 1827 ; took the full course at Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1827-30; spent the following year in this Seminary as resident 
licentiate. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New York in 1830, 
and ordained by the Presbytery of Albany, December 6, 1832, as the pastor of 
the First Presbyterian Church, Schenectady, N.Y. After a successful pastorate 
of forty years, he was compelled by blindness to discontinue active labor in 1873, 
but still continued his residence at Schenectady. 

He was a prominent trustee of Union College from 1852 to 1889, from which 
institution he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1847, and tnat of 
Doctor of Laws in 1875. He was elected by acclamation the moderator of the 



39 

Reunion General Assembly at Philadelphia in 1S70. His only publications were 
the history of his church at Schenectady during its first century, and the sermon 
at the funeral of his intimate friend and co-worker, Pres. Eliphalet Nott. "His 
active ministry was one of prayer and power, and his latter years a benediction. 
During the nine years of his blindness he often preached, repeating the hymns 
and Scripture lessons with unfailing accuracy. It would be difficult to estimate 
the value of his life during those sixty years, to his own church, the community 
in which he lived, and the church at large." 

Dr. Packus was married, April 30, 1835, to Anne Eliza Walworth, of Sara- 
toga Springs, X.V., daughter of Chancellor Reubin Hyde Walworth and Maria 
Ketchum Averill. Two sons died in childhood; two sons and four daughters, 
with their mother, are living. One of the sons is a minister in Kansas City, 
Kan., and the other a lawyer in New York City. 

Dr. Packus died of old age, at Schenectady, X. V., January 21, 1S92, lacking 
six days of being eighty-three years old. 



CLASS OF 1833. 

Joseph Loring. 

n of William Loring and Anna Drinkwater ; born in North Yarmouth 
(now Cumberland), Me., March prepared for college at North Yar- 

mouth and Gorham (Me.) Academies ; graduated at Powdoin College, 1S28, 
attending also the course of medical lectures in his senior year; in this Semi- 
nary, 1830-33. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. Milton Padger, Andover, April 17, 1833, and was ordained by 
the Presbytery of Newburypoi t, at Methuen, September 9, 1833, as home mis- 
sionary. He 1 ibored successively for two years in Painbridge and Andover, 
Ohio, returning then to Maine, where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was pastor in Lebanon eighteen years, from 1836 to 1854, and in Pownal 
from 1855 to 1S59. He supplied at Monson and Blanchard, 1859-60; at West 
Falmouth, iS6t-62; at Raymond and Casco, 1862-63; at North Edgecomb, 
1865-74. From 1874 he resided at East Otisfield without charge. 

A man of most unflinching integrity and martyr-like devotion to principle, 
he never yielded his ideas of right to the pressure of circumstances or of custom. 
In Otisfield, where he passed his later years, he was highly respected, and was 
familiarly called ' Father Loring.' " 

He was married, August 30, 1S37, to Susan Knapp Hancock, of Franklin 
N.H., daughter of John Hancock and Dorothy Sanborn, who survives him. 
Of seven children, two sons and four daughters are living. 

Mr. Luring died of liver complaint, combined with the feebleness of old age, 
at East Otisfield, Me., February 11, 1892, being nearly eighty-eight years old. 



CLASS OF 1834. 

Lewis Flanders Laine. 

Son of Daniel Lane and Esther Fogg; born in Loudon, N.H., September 6, 
1806; prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy; entered the sophomore 
class of Dartmouth College, graduating in 1830 ; principal of Woodman San- 
bornton (N.H.) Academy, 1830-31 ; student in this Seminary, 1831-34; licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Professor Emerson at 



40 

Andover, April i, 1834. He entered the home missionary service, and started 
at once on his " long and arduous journey to Ohio," via the Erie Canal. Feb- 
ruary 18, 1835, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational church at Bruns- 
wick, Ohio, having also charge of the church in the adjoining town of Hinckley. 
He was afterwards pastor at Bath, Ohio, nine years, and at Portland, N.Y., 
twelve years. From i860 to 1874 he was acting pastor of the Presbyterian 
church in Canisteo, N.Y., residing afterward in that place until his death. 

He was chaplain of a regiment of militia while in Brunswick, postmaster at 
Bath, Superintendent of Schools at Portland, and one of the founders of the 
Canisteo Academy, of whose board of trustees he was the president until his 
death. It was said at his funeral: " Few lives have made themselves felt in 
the community in so many directions. He has given shape to, and put in 
motion, forces which shall move on like the rivers of God, blessing the people." 

Mr. Laine was married, July 14, 1834, to Charlotte Mitchell, of Boxford, 
Mass., daughter of Capt. Daniel Mitchell and Hannah Hovey, who died August 
16, 1835. March 10, 1836, he married Vesta Richards, of Chatham, Ohio, 
daughter of Daniel Richards and Celia Allen. She died March 15, 1844, and 
his third wife, married October 23, 1844, was Alida Wood, of Madison, Ohio, 
daughter of Nathan Wood and Sarah Tracy. She survives him. Of seven 
children, two sons died in infancy, one son was a Union soldier and killed at the 
battle of Cold Harbor in 1864, two sons and two daughters are living. 

Mr. Laine died of paralysis, at Canisteo, N.Y., December 9, 1891, aged 
eighty- five years. 



David Fosdick. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Dea. David Fosdick and Joanna Skelton; born in Charlestown, 
Mass., November 9, 1813; prepared for college at Bradford Academy; gradu- 
ated at Amherst College, 1831 ; in this Seminary, 1831-33; resided at his home 
in Charlestown, at Brookline, at Andover (where he had private classes of stu- 
dents in German), and at Groton, until 1841. He was ordained pastor of the 
Unitarian church in Sterling, Mass., March 3, 1841, remaining there four years. 
He then succeeded Rev. John Pierpont as pastor of Hollis Street Church, 
Boston, 1846-47, afterwards residing in Groton until his death. From 1854 to 
i860 he ministered to a society which he had organized at Groton Junction, 
called the " South Groton Christian Union," now the First Unitarian Parish of 
Ayer, and was subsequently for some time minister at large in Groton. 

Mr. Fosdick was a fine classical scholar, and in early years devoted himself 
largely to study and authorship. He published (mostly at Andover) translations 
of de Sacy's Principles of General Gravunar and of Hug's Introduction to the New 
Testament (with notes by Professor Stuart), Introduction to the German Lan- 
guage, Introduction to the French Language, and a German and English Dic- 
tionary. He also published several sermons, including one preached at the 
dedication of a meeting-house at South Groton, entitled Sect is Sin, and con- 
tributed articles to the Biblical Repository and Christian Examiner. 

He was married, March 10, 1841, to Sarah Lawrence Woodbury, of Groton, 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Woodbury and Mary Lawrence. She died November 
25, i860. He married, second, January 28, 187 1, Mrs. Mary Jane Applin, daughter 
of Stephen Munroe Kendall and Ruth Shattuck, and widow of Benjamin Franklin 



41 

Applin, of Groton. The second wife died June 13, 1S79. Of nine children, two 
sons and three daughters are living. 

Mr. Fosdick died in Groton, Mass., January 2S, 1892, in his seventy-ninth 
year, having broken his thigh by a fall on the ice four years before, and suffered 
a stroke of paralysis about a year before. 

CLASS OF 1835. 

Alexander Joseph Sessions. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Harvey Sessions and Elizabeth Sabine; born in Western (now 
Warren), Mass., August 13, 1809; prepared for college at Monson Academy; 
graduated at Vale College, 1831 ; took the first two years of his theological 
course at this Seminary, 1832-34, and graduated at Yale Divinity School, 1835. 
He preached for a time at Haverhill, Mass., and was ordained June 6, 1S3S, as 
pastor of the Crombie Street Church, Salem, Mass., and remained there until 
1849; f rom ^49 ^ 1854 resided in Boston and vicinity, occasionally preaching ; 
from 1S54 to 1S5S was pastor at Melrose, Mass. ; resided without charge at 
Salem from 1858 to 1863; was pastor at North Scituate, Mass., from 1S63 to 
1869; resided without charge at Brookline, Mass., 1869-72, and from 
at Beverly, Mass., but supplying the church at North Beverly, 1873-75. He 
published two sermons, preached at Haverhill, in 1S37, on The Necessity of 
the Atonement, and Probation — when Ended; Mrs. Cyrus Stone — a Mission- 
ary Abroad and at Home, Andover, 1S76; and The Lord's Day Rescued, Boston, 
1883. Rev. William W. Andrews, a college classmate, writes: " Mr. Sessions 
was a man of great nobleness of character, a gentleman in his deportment, an 
earnest Christian, and a true and steadfast friend. He stood high as a writer 
in a class which numbered among its members ex-President Porter, Prof. Lyman 
H. Atwater, and Bishops Clark and Kip of the Episcopal Church." 

He was mairied, July 30, 1845, to Hannah Williams Seccomb, of Salem, 
daughter of Ebenezer Seccomb and Mary Marston. She survives him, but their 
only son died in South Africa, whither he had gone in ill health, in 1885. 

Mr. Sessions died of uraemia, at Beverly, January 16, 1892, in the eighty- 
third year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1836. 

Lucius Root Eastman. 

Son of Joseph Eastman and Lois Root; born in Hadley, Mass., September 
15, 1809; spent his boyhood in Montague, Mass.; prepared for college at 
Amherst Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1833; in this Seminary, 
1S33-36, and as resident licentiate, 1836-37 ; licensed by the Andover Associa- 
tion, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 5, 1836. He was 
ordained as pastor of the church in Sharon, Mass., November 15, 1837, and 
remained such for three years. He supplied, for short periods, the churches in 
Berkley and Chelsea, Mass., and Cornwall, Conn.; was acting pastor in Prov- 
incetown, Mass., 1842-44; preached in Pelham, Mass., in 1845; ministered to 
the Church of the Pilgrims, Boston, 1845-46; was acting pastor of the church 
in Berkley, 1846-48, and of a second church which he organized there, 1848-56; 
gathered and supplied a church in Needham, Mass., 1857-59; gathered a church 
at Port Norfolk, Dorchester, now Neponset, in 1859; preachedat Troy, N.H., 



4 2 

in i860, and to a congregation in what is now Hyde Park, 1860-62. He after- 
wards resided in Boston most of the time until his death, being engaged in inde- 
pendent religious work. Mr. Eastman was a member of the New England 
Historic- Genealogical Society, and prepared for the Society's Register a Gene- 
alogy of the Eastman Family. He also published two small volumes, Guide to 
God, and Guide to the Saviour. Although prevented by his health and his tastes 
from filling permanent pastorates, he faithfully preached the gospel which he 
loved for over a half century, usually in new or neglected fields in the country, 
or to sailors and others unconnected with the churches in the city. He con- 
tinued his evangelistic labors in Boston till within a few weeks of his death, 
having preached the last time February 14. 

He was married, December 20, 1837, to Sarah Ann Belden, of Amherst, 
Mass., daughter of Aaron Belden and Sarah Hibbard. She survives him, with 
one son, Rev. L. R. Eastman, Jr., of Framingham (Class of 1861), and two 
daughters. 

Mr. Eastman died of catarrh of the stomach, at Framingham, Mass., 
March 29, 1892, in the eighty-third year of his age. 



CLASS OP 1837. 

Jonathan Blanchard. {No n- graduate.) 

Son of Jonathan Blanchard and Mary Lovell ; born in Rockingham, Vt., 
January 19, 181 1; prepared for college at Chester (Vt.) Academy; graduated 
at Middlebury College, 1832; was principal of Plattsburgh (N.Y.) Academy, 
1832-34; in this Seminary, 1834-36; lecturer for the American Anti-Slavery 
Society in Pennsylvania, 1836-37 ; in Lane Seminary, 1837-38. He was or- 
dained by the Presbytery of Cincinnati, October 31, 1838, and was pastor of 
the Sixth Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1838-46. He was then 
president of Knox College, Galesburg, 111., from 1846 to i860, being also pastor 
of the church in Galesburg. 1847-49. He was president of Wheaton College, 
Wheaton, 111., from i860 to 18S2, and afterwards president emeritus, continuing 
his residence at Wheaton. 

Mr. Blanchard's early religious and educational labors in the formative 
period of Western institutions were very vigorous, and bore marked fruit. He 
was a man of exceedingly strong convictions, and uncompromisingly determined 
in carrying them out. He was at his best as a fighter against wrong, and spent 
much of his time and strength in aggressive opposition to what he felt to be the 
special evils of the day. When the anti-slavery struggle had ceased, he main- 
tained a steadfast warfare against secret societies, editing in that work the 
Christian Cynosure from 1868 to 1891, and publishing Free Masonry Illustrated ', 
Knight Templarism Illustrated, and Odd Fellowship Illustrated. His earlier 
Debate on Slavery with Dr. N. L. Rice was also published, and several occasional 
addresses. 

He married Mary A. Bent, who died several years ago. He had five sons 
and seven daughters ; five daughters are living and one son, Rev. Charles A. 
Blanchard, who succeeded him as president of Wheaton College. 

He died of heart failure, resulting from la grippe, at Wheaton, 111., May 14, 
1892, aged eighty-one years. 



43 
CLASS OP 1838. 

Asa Hemenway. 

Son of Francis S. Hemenway and Clara Turrill ; born in Shoreham, Vt., 
July 6, iSio; prepared for college at Newton Academy. Shoreham; graduated 
at Middlebury College, 1835; spent three years in the Seminary, 1835-38; was 
licensed to preach, April 10, 183S, by the Andover Association, at the house of 
Dr. Edwards, in Andover. He was ordained January 22, 1839, at Shoreham, 
Vt., as missionary of the American Hoard to Siam, whither he sailed the same 
year, together with Rev. Jesse Caswell of the Class of 1S37. After ten years of 
service in Bangkok, the capital of the country, the mission was discontinued, 
and he returned to this country, retaining the entire confidence and earnest 
approval of the Board. He was acting pastor in Cornwall, Vt., 1850-51; in 
Ripton, Vt., [851-60; in Keeseville, X.Y.. [860-64; ra Mooers, X.Y., 1S65- 
68; in West Hartford, Vt, [S69~7[ ; in South Royalton, Vt, and East Chazy, 
N.Y., 1S7 1-72. He resided without charge at Mooers until [876, afterwards 
with his son. Dr. Lewis II. Hemenway, in Manchester, Vt. His only publica- 
tion was a book of geography and history of foreign countries, prepared for the 
Siamese, but he aided in the translation and printing of portions of the Bible 
into Siamese, and had for three years the charge of the mission printing office. 
Rev. S. L. Bates (Class of [863) wrote: " Mr. Hemenway was a man of fine 
scholarly attainments, and a good preacher; but his special power lay in his 
sweet, sincere spirit, his earnest purpose and rare Christian example." Rev. 
Charles S. Smith (Class of 1S53) wrote: "He was of a beautiful, John-like 
character, and was esteemed and beloved by all who kiuw him." 

He was married, April 14, [839, to Lucia Hunt, of Shoreham, Vt., daughter 
of Samuel Hunt and Lucretia Moore. She died November [3, 1864. They 
had two sons and one daughter; the latter died in [870. 

He died of feebleness, resulting from la grippe, at Manchester, Vt., Feb- 
ruary 26, 1892, in his eighty-second year. 



Artemas Augustus Wood, D.D. 

Son of Artemas Wood and Catherine Drake ; born in Leominster, Mass., 
June 22, [Si 1 ; prepared for college at Amherst and West Randolph (Vt.) Acad- 
emies; graduated at Amherst College, 1831; studied in this Seminary, 1831-32; 
was principal of a classical school in Pottsville, Penn., 1832-34, and of Danville 
(Penn.) Academy, 1834-36; took the remainder of the course at the Seminary, 
1836-38; was licensed to preach, April 10, 1838, by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover; was ordained December [9, 1838, 
as pastor of the church in West Springfield, Mass., where he remained for nine 
years. He was pastor of the Pearl Street Presbyterian Church, New York City, 
1849-53, retaining the pastorate when that church and the Central Presbyterian 
Church were united under the name of the Central Church, until i860. He was 
then pastor for thirteen years of the First Presbyterian Church, Geneva, N.Y., 
and for nine years of the church in Lyons, N.Y. Retiring from active labor in 
1882, he resided in Rochester, N.Y., until 1S90, and afterwards in Flushing, L.I. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton College in 
1857. " His extensive learning, his genial bearing, his charming conversational 
powers, his generous charities, his faithful service as pastor, his devotion to his 



44 

sacred calling, all these and more are affectionately remembered." " He was 
remarkably successful in his work among men. It is said that in his church at 
Geneva every male member of his congregation was a member of the church." 

He was married, May 13, 1840, to Martha Perkins Lathrop, of West Spring- 
field, Mass., daughter of Hon. Joseph Lathrop and Mary McCracken. She sur- 
vives him, with three sons, a son and a daughter having deceased. 

Dr. Wood died of disease of bladder and kidneys, at Flushing, L.I., Feb- 
ruary 4, 1892, in his eighty first year. 



GLASS OF 1840. 

Franklin Davenport Harris. 

Son of William Harris and Maria Loder ; born in Philadelphia, Penn., 
September 8, 1812; prepared for college in Philadelphia; graduated at the 
University of Pennsylvania, 1837, in the same class with Professor Phelps; was 
licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, 
Andover, April 7, 1840. He was ordained by the Presbytery of Philadelphia, Octo- 
ber 7, 1840, and successively served home missionary churches in Hublersburgh 
and Mount Joy, Penn., 1840-51 ; was pastor of Presbyterian churches in Bristol, 
Penn., 1851-60, Port Byron, N. Y., 1861-67, Woodbury, N.J., 1867-76. He 
resided without charge in Camden, N. J., from 1876 to 1890, and afterwards in 
Philadelphia. "In the fifty years of his ministry he bore hardness as a good 
soldier, submitted with patience to self-denial, and abounded in labors for the 
cause of Christ and the good of men." 

Mr. Harris was married, August 23, 1841, to Matilda Wallace, of Phila- 
delphia, daughter of William Wallace and Anna Newkirk. She died July 6, 
1880. Of their two sons and two daughters, one daughter alone survives. 

He died of uraemia, at Philadelphia, February 23, 1892, in the eightieth 
year of his age. 

Josiah Wheelock Peet. 

Son of Wheelock Peet and Alcy Hickok; born in Enosburgh, Vt., Septem- 
ber 11, 1808; prepared for college at the West Rutland and Brandon (Vt.) 
Academies; graduated at Middlebury College, 1836; taught in St. Lawrence 
Academy, Potsdam, N.Y., 1836-37; in the Seminary, 1837-40; was licensed to 
preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, An- 
dover, April 7, 1840. He was ordained as pastor of the church in Gardiner, Me., 
December 15, 1841, and remained there until 1848. In 1849 he established at 
Fall River, Mass., the " Hermitage Home School," a boarding-school for boys, of 
which he was principal until 1859, when his health obliged him to abandon that 
work. Residing for a time without charge in Hopkinton and Easthampton, 
Mass., he resumed teaching, first at Brighton, Io., 1861-62, then in the high 
school at Oshkosh, Wis., 1862-64, and in Yellow Springs (now Parsons) 
College, Fairfield, Io., 1864-67. From 1867 to 1880 he labored as a home 
missionary in Fontanelle, Io., with out-stations in different parts of the county. 
He resided afterwards without charge at Nevinville, Io., 18S0-85, and at Monti- 
cello, Io., from 1885 until his death. 

The writer of a sketch in an Iowa newspaper says : " Father Peet, and the 



45 

white pony that he rode fof years, became such familiar figures in that part of 
Iowa that there are few settlers in the county of Adair who do not remember 
them. These pioneers can all speak kindly, too, of big-hearted, generous, good- 
natured Father Peet, who carried the Word of the Master into their homes, and 
taught them the better way of life. The scholarship which he displayed in this 
unselfish work marked him as one of the most conspicuous home missionaries 
of Southwestern Iowa." 

Mr. Peet was married, November 17, 1840, to Louisa C. Rich, of Vergennes, 
Vt., daughter of Thomas Rich and Elizabeth Hartwell, who survives him, with 
two sons and three daughters. One of the sons is the treasurer of the Turkish 
Missions of the American Hoard at Constantinople. 

Mr. Peet died of congestion of the kidneys, at Monticello, Io., April 17, 
1892, in the eighty-fourth year of his age. 



Charles Chauncy Shackford. aduate.) 

Son of Capt. William Moore Shackford and Joanna Chauncy Moore ; born 
in Portsmouth, X.H., September 26, iS 1 5 ; prepared for college at Phillips 
Exeter Academy; graduated at Harvard College, 1S35, the valedictorian of his 
Studied in Harvard Law School, 1 S36 ; in Union Theological Seminary, 
;<;; in this Seminary, 1839-40. He was city missionary in Portsmouth 
one year, and was ordained, May 19, 1S41. as pastor of the Hawes Place Uni- 
tarian Church, South Boston, Theodore Parker preaching on the occasion his 
since famous sermon on " The Transient and Permanent in Christianity." He 
remained there until 1843, anc ^ was tften engaged in business at Burlington, Io., 
for three years. Returning East, he was installed over the Unitarian church in 
Lynn, Mass., in December, 1S46, and continued its pastor until 1864. From 
1862 he taught a school for young ladies in Boston, removing there in 1S65. 
This "Concord Hall School" was continued until 1871, when he became pro- 
fessor of Rhetoric and Literature in Cornell University. Retiring as professor 
emeritus in 1886, he afterwards resided in Brookline, Mass. 

During his long pastorate in Lynn he was a recognized leader in educa- 
tional movements, as a member of the school committee and by aiding in the 
establishment of the public library, the high school, and literary clubs and lec- 
tures. " During the nation's supreme struggle his voice and pen were never 
silent nor idle." He contributed freely to current literature, and made the first 
translations for this country of Auerbach's novels. A volume of Social and 
Literary Papers has appeared since his death. " In religion he was broad and 
tolerant, and was scarcely a denominationalist. It was the fundamental princi- 
ples of life and religion that he was in search of, and it was these he taught with 
great wealth of knowledge and an abundance of practical insight." 

He was married, June 3, 1841, to Charlotte Louisa Shackford, of Ports- 
mouth, daughter of Capt. John Shackford and Jane Smallcon. She died 
October 13, 1S45. *"* e married, second, September 22, 1846, Martha Gold 
Bartlett, of Lowell, daughter of Wait Bartlett and Martha Gold Chapin, who 
survives him, with one son and three daughters. One daughter died in infancy. 

Mr. Shackford died of la grippe, in Brookline, Mass., December 25, 1891, 
aged seventy-six years. 



4 6 
GLASS OP 1843. 

Thomas Harvey Skinner, D.D., LL.D. {Noil- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D.D., LL.D. (professor of Sacred Rheto- 
ric in Andover Seminary, 1833-35), and Emily Montgomery; born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., October 6, 1820; took the first two years of his college course at 
Yale, and graduated at the University of New York, 1840; in Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary, 1840-42 ; in this Seminary, 1842-43, but graduating at Union Semi- 
nary, 1843. He was ordained, December 8, 1843, as pastor of the Presbyterian 
church in Paterson, N.J., and remained there three years; was pastor of the 
West Presbyterian (Carmine St.) Church, New York City, 1846-55; in Hones- 
dale, Penn., 1856-59; of Reformed Dutch Church, Stapleton, Staten Island, 
N.Y., 1858-68; of the First Presbyterian Church, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1868-71; 
of the Second Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1871-81. In the latter 
year he was made professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology in McCormick 
Theological Seminary (then the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the North- 
west), Chicago, 111., where he continued to reside afterwards, his chair being 
changed in 1890 to that of professor of Divinity. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the College of New 
Jersey in 1867, and that of Doctor of Laws from Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege. He was a trustee of Lake Forest University. A correspondent of the 
New York Evangelist wrote: "Though an ardent disciple of the higher or Old 
School Calvinism, Dr. Skinner was inclusive rather than the contrary when it 
came to personal tastes and sympathies, in which he was very broad, his warm 
heart prevailing over all the limitations of his creed. But he was a stalwart 
believer, ever ready to give a reason for the faith that was in him. Inheriting a 
good deal of property through his wife, he made a most generous use of it, giv- 
ing liberally to the Church of the Covenant in Chicago, and to the Seminary, 
which he so greatly loved." Dr. H. M. Field said in an address at Chicago: 
" One could not forget him, or cease to love him, he was so open-hearted, so 
frank, so manly, and so true. " 

Dr. Skinner was married, November 28, 1843, to Mary Sanford Day, of 
Springfield, Mass., daughter of Benjamin Day and Frances Dwight. She died 
May 2, 1879. Of two daughters and three sons, one daughter alone survives. 

He died of pneumonia, following la grippe, at Chicago, 111., January 4, 1892, 
aged seventy- one years. 

CLASS OF 1844. 

Jeremy Webster Tuck. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Jonathan Tuck and Dorothy Webster ; born in Kensington, N.H., 
October 8, 181 1 ; graduated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1836, and at Amherst 
College, 1840; preceptor of Brattleboro (Vt.) Academy, 1840-41; studied one 
year, 1841-42, in this Seminary, and completed his course in the Theological 
Institute of Connecticut at East Windsor, 1843. He was licensed to preach 
February 14, 1843, bv tne Hampden Association, in the Third Parish Church, 
West Springfield (now Holyoke), Mass. He was ordained at Ludlow, Mass., 
September 6, 1843, anc * remained in that pastorate sixteen years. From i860 to 
1865 he was acting pastor of the First Church, Palmer (Thorndike), Mass. ; 



47 

from 1866 to 1876 pastor of the church in Jewett City, Conn. ; and from 1877 to 
1SS1 of the Third Church, Middletown, Conn. He was afterwards for several 
years assistant pastor to Rev. Dj. A. W. Hazen, of the First Church, Middle- 
town, in the mean time supplying the church in Marlboro, Conn., in 1SS3, and 
the church in Millington, Conn., in 1 884- In 1889 he removed to Springfield, 
M — ., identifying himself with the Park Church, of which he was one of the 
charter members, and bringing forth fruit in his old age as teacher of the Busi- 
ncvs Men's Class in its Sunday school. Several of Mr. Tuck's sermons were pub- 
lished, and also his Historical Address delivered at the centennial celebration 
of the town of Ludlow, in 1S74. He was a prolific contributor to the press, 
making three special tours to California as a newspaper correspondent. Rev. 
H. M. burr, his Springfield pastor, said in his memorial sermon: "As a ser- 
nonizer he had unusual power, though his natural diffidence prevented his 
taking the place he might have done. Of his 1 k in 

Ludlow is witness; Dr. Osgood used to say that he never had known such a 
change in a church and town as «raa brought about by Mr. Tuck's minis:: 

Mr. Tack was married, September I, 1S43, to Irene M . , of 

South Iladley, Mass., daughter of Spencer Moody and Wealthy Montague. 
She died August 28, 1S44, and he was married, November 4, 1S45, to Ann Ruby 
,, <>f Norwich. Conn., daughter of Samuel Mowry and Cynthia Cary, who 
survives him. Three daughters are living, one daughter and three sons having 
died in early life. 

Mr. Tuck died of apoplexy, at Springfield, Mass., February 25, 1892, aged 
eighty years. 

CLASS OF 1845. 

James Herrick. 

1 of Nathaniel Herrick and Lydia Eastman (both of Brattleboro, Vt.) ; 
born in Broome, Canada Fast, March 19, 1S14; fitted for college at Brattleboro 
Academy; graduated at Williams College, 1 S4 r ; was preceptor of Brattleboro 
Academy, 1S41-42; took the full course in this Seminary, 1842-45; was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor, 
Andover, April 7, 1S45. ** e was ordained at Brattleboro, October 10, 1845, as 
a missionary of the American Board. He sailed at once on the ship Malabar 
from Boston for Southern India, where he labored continuously — with the 
exception of a visit to this country, 1S64-66 — and successfully until 1883. 
Returning then to the United States, he spent the remaining years of his life in 
the home of his childhood, West Brattleboro, Vt. Rev. Lewis Grout, of West 
Brattleboro (Class of 1846), writes: " His great study and grand aim through 
all his long life were to put his talents and attainments to the best possible use." 
Rev. J. H. Babbitt (Class of 1868), his pastor at West Brattleboro, said in his 
memorial sermon : " In these later years of deprivation from his chosen work, 
he has . . . served us day and night, according to his strength and beyond ; 
served us in word, served us in deed, served us in a remarkable example, of 
which to speak freely is not to speak in fulsome praise." 

Mr. Herrick was married, November 2, 1845, to Elizabeth Hopkins Crosby, 
of Brattleboro, daughter of Thomas Crosby and Catherine Burt, who survives 
him, with four sons and two daughters, four daughters having died in India. 
One son is an editor in New York City, another a physician in Springfield, 



4 8 

Mass., and the youngest, David Scudder, has been a teacher in Pasumalai Col- 
lege, India, five years, and is now studying in Union Theological Seminary in 
preparation for tne missionary work in India. 

Mr. Herrick died of heart failure, at West Brattleboro, Vt, December I, 
1891, in his seventy-eighth year. 



Samuel Jones Spalding, D.D. 

Son of Abijah Spalding and Hannah Eastman; born in Lyndeborough, 
N.H., December 11, 1820; prepared for college under David Crosby at the 
Nashua (N.H.) Literary Institution; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1842; 
took the full course in this Seminary, 1842-45; licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor, Andover, April 8, 1845. 
He was for a short time in home missionary service at Winslow, Me., but early 
in 1846 took charge of a new congregation at Salmon Falls (in Rollinsford), 
N.H. This was soon organized as a church, and he was ordained as its first 
pastor, October 28, 1846. He remained there until 1851, when he was called by 
the Whitefield Church, Newburyport, Mass., which had been organized the year 
before, and whose first pastor, Rev. John E. Emerson, had died after a short 
service. This congregation, then worshiping in a hall, built a church at once, 
and Mr. Spalding continued the pastor for thirty-three years, until 1884. He 
then resumed his early charge at Salmon Falls, and, without removing his resi- 
dence, supplied that church regularly until increasing feebleness obliged him, in 
the summer of 1891, to give up further labor. 

Mr. Spalding received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Ingham Uni- 
versity in 1861, and from Dartmouth College in 1872. He was chaplain of the 
48th Massachusetts Regiment in the War of the Rebellion, 1862-63, serving in 
the Army of the Gulf. He was member of the New England Historic- Genea- 
logical Society, and corresponding member of the Wisconsin State Histori- 
cal Society. He published Contributions to the Ecclesiastical History of Essex 
County (a history of the Essex North Association), and the Spalding Memorial, 
a genealogical work. He was for many years trustee of Dummer Academy, 
Hampton (N.H.) Academy, and Dearborn Academy (Seabrook, N.H.), as also 
of the public library and free reading room of Newburyport. For a long 
series of years he was a member of the school board of the city. Dr. Spalding 
was a popular and successful pastor, and for the long period of his residence in 
Newburyport was thoroughly and usefully identified with its social, educational, 
literary, and civil affairs. 

He was married, June 27, 1848, to Sarah Lydia Metcalf, of Medway, Mass., 
daughter of Hon. Luther Metcalf and Sarah Brown Phipps. She died Septem- 
ber 1, 1849. He was married, second, September 16, 1851, to Sarah Jane Parker 
Toppan, of Hampton, N. H., daughter of Hon. Edmund Toppan and Mary Chase. 
She survives him, with two daughters and one son. 

Dr. Spalding died of valvular difficulty of the heart, at Newburyport, April 10, 
1892, aged seventy-one years. 



49 
CLASS OF 1846. 

John Summers Holmes. 

Son of Rev. Sylvester Holmes and Esther Holmes; born in New Bedford, 
Mass., February 2, 1823; studied two years in Amherst College, 1836-38, and 
one year in Brown University, 1S38-39; took the full course in the Seminary, 
graduating in 1S46, remaining here afterwards as resident licentiate. He 
preached for a short time in Sandwich, Mass., and then, deciding to change his 
profession, studied law with Rufus Choate, Boston. He was admitted to the 
Suffolk Bar in 184S, and was a counsellor at law in Boston during his life. 

He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1854, 
and delivered the Fourth of July oration before the municipal authorities in 
1858. " In late years, on account of heart trouble, he abandoned the practice 
of law in the courts, and confined himself to the trial of causes sent to him as 
auditor in law or master in equity. He had so many of these cases that he was 
known as 'Judge Holmes.'" 

He married Mrs. Minerva Chace Durfee, of Fall River, Mass., daughter of 
Samuel Chace and Eunice Hathaway, and widow of Joseph Durfee ; and, second, 
Anne Keenan, of Lynnfield, Mass., daughter of Dr. Thomas Keenan. His 
children reside in New York. 

He died of dilatation of the heart and myocarditis, in Boston, May 14, 1892, 
aged sixty- nine years. 

Francis Greenleaf Pratt. 

Son of Capt. Greenleaf Pratt and Lucy Edson ; born at North Middleboro, 
Mass., January 30, 182 1 ; prepared for college at Bridgewater and Amherst 
Academies; graduated at Amherst College, 1840; was master of grammar 
school in New Bedford, Mass., 1840-41, and principal of Bridgewater Academy, 
1841-43; began his theological course at Union Seminary, 1S43-45, and com- 
pleted it in this Seminary, graduating in 1846, remaining another year as resident 
licentiate. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 7, 1846, and ordained as pastor of the 
"Winthrop Church in South Maiden (now Everett), Mass., October 19, 1849. 
After a faithful and successful pastorate there of nine years, he retired with 
impaired health from the active ministry, and removed to the well-known home- 
stead of his father-in-law, Hon. Zechariah Eddy, at Eddyville, in Middleboro, 
where he continued to reside, with the exception of one year, 1860-61, when he 
was acting pastor in Peacedale, R. I. 

Of his long residence in Middleboro, Rev. J. W. Kingsbury writes: "To 
years of usefulness as a preacher of the gospel, he added other years of eminent 
usefulness as teacher of a Bible class numbering from thirty to forty members. 
He was not an idle man. Literary work of various kinds engaged his facile 
pen." He was for many years a trustee of Middleboro Academy, and con- 
tributed extensively to the Eddy and Pratt Genealogies. 

He was married, September 8, 1846, to Charlotte Elizabeth Eddy, of 
Middleboro, daughter of Hon. Zechariah Eddy and Sarah Edson. She survives 
him, with two sons, a son and a daughter having died in childhood. One of the 
sons was for several years connected with the Boston Advertiser, and the other 
is one of the proprietors of the Youth's Companion. 

Mr. Pratt died of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic nephritis, in Middleboro, 
Mass., August 17, 1891, aged seventy years. 



5o 
CLASS OF 1849. 

Albert Tolman. (Non-graduate.) 

Son of Capt. Stephen Tolman and Mary Pierce; born in Dorchester, Mass., 
February 13, 1824; prepared for college under the tuition of his brother, Rev. 
Richard Tolman (Class of 1844), at Hancock (N.H.) Academy, and of Rev. 
William Wakefield (Class of 1845), at Dorchester; graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1845; taught at Montague and Wayland, Mass.; spent a part of two years 
in the Seminary, 1846-48 ; was tutor in Amherst College, 1848-51 ; instructor in 
Ancient Languages and Natural History at the Young Ladies' Institute (after- 
wards Maplewood Institute), Pittsfield, Mass., 1851-55; founder and principal 
of the Taghonic Institute for Boys, Lanesboro, Mass., 1855-68; principal of 
high school, Pittsfield, 186S-78 ; resided afterwards in Pittsfield. 

Mr. Tolman was never ordained, but occasionally preached ; he was deacon 
and Sunday-school superintendent in the South Church, Pittsfield. His life 
work was teaching, and was most successfully accomplished. " He was a man 
of fine scholarship and of rare faithfulness to his duties as an instructor. He 
loved to study and to teach whatever was true and beautiful and good. In his 
general character he was distinguished for his sincerity of- purpose and expres- 
sion, and for his simplicity of heart." 

He was married, September 23, 1853, to J ane Amelia Tower, of Lanesboro, 
daughter of Justus Tower and Emeline Talcott. She died September 30, 187 1. 
He was married, second, August 6, 1872, to Mrs. Caroline Amelia Wilson, of 
Pittsfield, daughter of Chauncey Goodrich and Amelia May, and widow of Dr. 
Nelson J. Wilson, and she survives him. Two of his five sons were graduates 
of Williams College, one being a professor in Ripon College. 

Mr. Tolman died of inflammation of the bladder, at Pittsfield, Mass., 
August 17, 1891, aged sixty-seven years. 



CLASS OP 1851. 

John Gardner Hale. 

Son of Harry Hale and Lucinda Eddy; born in Chelsea, Vt., September 12, 
1824; prepared for college at Royalton (Vt.) Academy; graduated at the Uni- 
versity of Vermont, 1845; taught successively at Grand Isle, Vt., Kingsport, 
Tenn., and St. Johnsbury, Vt., 1845-48; in this Seminary, 1848-51 ; licensed to 
preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor, Andover, 
April 15, 1851. He was ordained at Chelsea, Vt., September 30, 1852, as a home 
missionary, and labored at Grass Valley, Cal., until 1857. Returning then to 
Vermont, he was acting pastor at Lyndon, 1857-59; pastor at East Poultney, 
1860-69; acting pastor at Chester, 1869-76, and at Stowe, 1877-81. He then 
crossed the continent again, and became the first resident pastor of the Second 
Church in'San Bernardino (now First Church in Redlands), Cal., then worship- 
ing in a small schoolhouse, and retained that charge until 1885. For a part of 
the time he also preached to a new congregation, now the Highlands Church at 
Messina. In 1886 he established Bellevue Academy in Lugonia (now Redlands), 
of which he was principal until 1889. 

He was the town superintendent of schools in Poultney, Chester, and Stowe, 
Vt. He contributed scholarly articles to the Bibliotheca Sacra, New Englander, 



5i 

Boston Review, and Congregational Quarterly. u He has left an enviable record 
as a preacher, teacher, and thoroughly conscientious, devoted, and self-denying 
man." 

He was married, September 28, 1852, to Phila Jane Dwinell, of Calais, Vt., 
daughter of Israel Dwinell and Phila Oilman. She survives him, with one son, 
Rev. Edson U. Hale, a Congregational pastor in California, and three daughters, 
one daughter having deceased. 

He died of pneumonia and heart failure, at Redlands, Cal., March 23, 1S92, 
aged sixty-seven years. 

Orlando Henry White, D.D. {Resident licentiate.) 

Son of Henry White and Sophronia Waterman; born at Livermore Falls, 
Me., January 9, 1820; fitted for college at North Yarmouth (Me.) Academy; 
took the first two years of college course at Bowdoin, and graduated at Amherst, 
1846; graduated at Bangor Theological Seminary, 1849; clerk for secretaries of 
American Board, Boston, 1849-50; resident licentiate in this Seminary, part of 
the year, 1850-51, while supplying the church in Westminster, Mass., over 
which he was ordained, August 21, 1S51. He remained there until 1854; was 
pastor of the church at Washington Heights, New York City, 1S54-58; of the 
Centre Church, Meriden, Conn., 185S-63; acting pastor at Orleans, Mass., 1863- 
66, residing in Boston; pastor of Howard Avenue Church, New Haven, Conn., 
1866-75; secretary of Freedmen's Missions Aid Society, London, England, 1875— 
81. Returning to this country, he resided for two years in New Haven, Conn., 
afterwards in Boston. He supplied the church in Middlebury, Vt., 1887-88, and 
the churches in Essex Junction and Winooski, Vt., 18S8-90. 

Mr. White received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Adrian College 
in 1870. His service abroad was an important one, informing the Christian 
people of Great Britain of the religious needs of the freedmen in America. He 
prepared and delivered many valuable lectures on The Divine Footsteps in the 
Rebellion, Africa, her People and her Future, and kindred subjects. 

He was married, April 4, 1852, to Mary Barnes Pomroy, of Boston, daughter 
of Rev. Swan L. Pomroy, D.D., and Frances Maria Fales. She died August 19, 
1855, an( J he married, December 19, 1859, Mrs. Charlotte Bliss Loomis, daughter 
of Alfred Bliss and Mary Roberts, of Hartford, Conn., and widow of Samuel O. 
Loomis, of Windsor, Conn. She died September 10, 1889. One child died in 
infancy, and a married daughter resides in Dorchester. 

Dr. White died of heart failure, at Stratford, Conn., January 8, 1892, lack- 
ing one day of being seventy- two years old. 



CLASS OP 1852. 

Edmund Harvey Blanchard. 

Son of Edmund Blanchard and Anna Abbot ; born in Greensboro, Vt., 
January 16, 1821 ; prepared for college at Craftsbury (Vt.) Academy ; graduated 
at Middlebury College, 1848 ; was principal of Lyndon (Vt.) Academy one year ; 
spent three years in the Seminary, and a fourth year as resident licentiate. He 
was licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. William T. Briggs 
at North Andover, April 13, 1852, and, as his health permitted, supplied 



52 

churches in different places, especially at Epsom, N.H., 1854-55; at Ludlow, 
Vt., 1857 ; and at Chiltonville (in Plymouth), 1857-58. He was ordained as 
pastor at Warwick, Mass., April 25, i860, and remained there eight years. 
Failing health compelled him then to leave the ministry, and he removed to 
Bloomington, 111., where he was engaged in the drug business until 1887. He 
was known as a man of earnest Christian character and sterling integrity. Rev. 
Roswell Foster (Class of 1853), at one time a Seminary room-mate, writes : " I 
remember Mr. Blanchard as a quiet, self-distrustful man, of excellent Christian 
spirit, faithful in his daily work of study and self-discipline, seeking not for 
greatness or renown, but for goodness and usefulness." 

He was married, May 16, i860, to Annie Clifford, of Loudon, N.H., daughter 
of Joseph Eastman Clifford and Jane Martin, who survives him. 

After a long illness, he died of heart disease, at Bloomington, 111., October 
22, 1891, aged seventy years. 

GLASS OF 1853. 

Charles Augustus Aiken, Ph.D., D.D. 

Son of Hon. John Aiken (for many years a trustee of the Seminary) and 
Harriet Russell Adams; born in Manchester, Vt., October 30, 1827; prepared 
for college at the high school in Lowell, where his father then resided ; gradu- 
ated at Dartmouth College, 1846; assisted Rev. James Means (Class of 1838) at 
Lawrence Academy, Groton, 1846-47 ; taught Latin and Greek under Dr. Samuel 
H.Taylor at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1847-49; entered the Seminary in 
1849 an d graduated in 1853, having in the mean time studied two years in Berlin, 
Halle, and Leipsic, Germany. He was licensed by the Andover Association, 
meeting in John Street Church, Lowell, June 14, 1853, and retained his connec- 
tion with the Seminary as resident licentiate, 1853-54. He was ordained pastor 
of the church at Yarmouth, Me., October 19, 1854, remaining such until 1859. 
From 1859 to 1866 he was professor of the Latin Language and Literature in 
Dartmouth College, and occupied the same chair in the College of New Jersey 
from 1866 to 1869, when he was elected president of Union College. He re- 
signed that position in 187 1, and returned to Princeton to become professor of 
Christian Ethics and Apologetics in the Theological Seminary. Later, the title 
of his chair was changed to that of the Relations of Philosophy and Science to 
the Christian Religion, and of Oriental and Old Testament Literature, and this 
he held until his death. From 1871 to 1877 he was also librarian of the 
Seminary. 

In addition to this long and eminent service as a teacher of language, the- 
ology, and philosophy, he performed a large amount of literary work, contribut- 
ing in earlier years to the Bibliotheca Sacra, and later to the Princeton Review, 
to the Presbyterian Review (which, as the associate of Professor Briggs, he 
started in 1880), to the present Presbyterian and Reformed Review, and to the 
Catholic Presbyterian (London). He translated and edited Zockler's Com- 
mentary on the Proverbs for the American edition of Lange's Commentaries, 
and was a member of the Old Testament Company of the Bible Revision Com- 
mittee. He was a trustee of the Lawrenceville (N.J.) School, and connected 
with the American Oriental Society, the American Philological Association, and 
the Social Science Association. In 1888 he was a delegate at large from the 
United States to the World's Conference on Protestant Missions, in London. 



53 

The College of New Jersey conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in 1866, and that of Doctor of Divinity in 1870. Prof. B. B. Warfield, 
D.D., wrote in the Presbyterian and Reformed Review : "His greatest distinc- 
tion was philosophy, but to each department of study which it fell to him to 
cultivate he brought an unwearied industry, an insatiable avidity for learning, 
and habits of exact scholarship which made themselves felt." Prof. Charles 
A. Young, LL.D., said in his memorial address : " And he was a good man 
through and through; he was strictly honest, upright, and punctual in all busi- 
ness matters; he was kind and generous, and with a wide range of sympathy he 
was ready to spend and be spent in the service of his fellow- men." 

Dr. Aiken was married, October 17, 1854, to Sarah Elizabeth Noyes, of 
Andover, daughter of Dea. Daniel Noyes (formerly treasurer of the Seminary) 
and Eleanor Clark, who survives him. 

He died of pneumonia, at Princeton, N.J., January 14, 1S92, aged sixty- 
four years. 



Roswell Foster. 

Son of Richard Foster and Irene Davis Burroughs ; born in Hanover, N.H., 
June 30, 1824; prepared for college at Henniker and Hopkinton (N.H.) Acade- 
mies; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1849; m ^ 1S Seminary, 1849-50, and 
'851-53- He was ordained pastor of the Second Church at Waltham, Mass., 
March 14, 1855. He was subsequently pastor at Westhampton, 1856-58; of 
the South Church, Pittsfield, 1859-61 ; acting pastor of Second Church, Chico- 
pee (Chicopee Falls), until 1863, and installed pastor until 1867 (doing service 
under the United States Christian Commission in the summer of 1864); acting 
pastor, Nebraska City, Neb., 1867-72 ; Fremont, Neb., 1872-75; without charge 
at Newton, Io., 1875-76, and at Ottumwa, Io., 1876-77; acting pastor, Inde- 
pendence, Io., 1877-82, and also at Winthrop, Io., 1877-79; Westmoreland, 
N.H., 1884-85 ; Templeton and Baldwinsville, Mass., 1885-89; Phillipston and 
Petersham, 1SS9-92. 

" His influence over young men has been a marked feature in his ministry. 
Mr. Foster was a strong anti-slavery man, and espoused the temperance reform 
with invincible determination. Men who would sell rum regarded him as an 
enemy, and not without reason. He dealt terrific blows at the saloon traffic, 
and at any interest connected with the infamous business." Though with rap- 
idly failing strength, Mr. Foster continued to preach as long as he could stand 
in the pulpit, until within a few weeks of his death. 

He was married, March 20, 1855, to Esther Josephine Eewis, of Hunting- 
ton, Mass., daughter of Gilbert S. and Caroline Lewis. She died August 24 
1864, in Washington, D.C., having been prostrated by camp fever while work- 
ing among the soldiers at Point Lookout. He married, second, July 24, 1867, 
Mary La Fore, of Chateaugay, N.Y., daughter of John La Fore and Ada Perry. 
She survives him, with two sons and two daughters, three children having 
died. 

Mr. Foster died of Bright's disease, at Phillipston, Mass., May 7, 1892, in 
the sixty-eighth year of his age. 



54 
CLASS OP 1857. 

John Gunn Baird. 

Son of Jonah Newton Baird and Minerva Gunn; born in Milford, Conn., 
November 27, 1826; prepared for college at Milford High School; graduated 
at Yale College, 1852; was classical instructor for two years in Judge Hall's 
famous "Ellington School" at Ellington, Conn. ; took the full course in this 
Seminary; was licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. C. E. 
Fisher at Andover, February 10, 1857; from 1857 to 1859 supplied the churches 
in Fitzwilliam, N.H., Canton and Torrington, Conn., for several months each, 
attending in the latter year lectures at the Yale Divinity School, as resident 
licentiate. He was ordained, June 2, 1859, as pastor of the Second Church of 
Saybrook at Centerbrook (now in the town of Essex), Conn. He continued in 
this pastorate until 1865, when a bronchial affection compelled him to relinquish 
the active duties of the ministry. From 1867 to J ^3 ne wa s Assistant Secretary 
of the Connecticut Board of Education, residing first at New Haven, and after- 
wards, with the change of the State capital, at Hartford. From 1885 he lived 
at Ellington. 

Besides writing considerable portions of the annual reports of the Board, 
he contributed articles to educational journals and to JoJdisoii's Encyclopedia, 
and the history of Ellington to Stiles's History of Windsor. He left incomplete 
a genealogy of the Baird (Beard) family. Rev. Dr. Geo. L. Walker, of whose 
church at Hartford Mr. Baird was a member, wrote of him : " While with us he 
was, as ever, a modest, painstaking, kind-hearted man and cooperant parishioner, 
willing to take his full share of the church's work and responsibilities. He has 
left the memory of a good man and minister of the gospel behind him." He 
was borne to his burial by aged men, members of the large Bible class which 
he had conducted in his last years at Ellington. 

He was married, June 15, 1859, to Eliza Hall, of Ellington, daughter of 
Judge John Hall and Sophia Kingsbury, who survives him. 

Mr. Baird died of pneumonia, at Ellington, Conn., December 22, 1891, aged 
sixty-five years. 

CLASS OF 1860. 

Henry Dwight Woodworth. 

Son of John Martin Woodworth and Mary Waterman Armstrong ; born in 
Lebanon, Conn., February 18, 1826; prepared for college at Monson Academy; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1855; was professor of Mathematics, Paducah 
(Ky.) College, 1855-56; instructor in Smithville Seminary, North Scituate, R.I., 
1856-57; in this Seminary, 1857-60; ordained, September 12, i860, as pastor of 
the Union Church of East and West Bridgewater, Mass., and remained there 
until 1862. He supplied the church at West Needham (now Wellesley), Mass., 
1863-65 ; was city missionary in Boston, 1866-67 > pastor at Westford, Mass., 
1867-69; acting pnstor at Rehoboth, 1870-73. From 1873 to ^S he resided 
in Cambridge, Mass., during ten years of that period carrying on the business 
of jeweler in Boston, in connection with his son. Returning to ministerial labor, 
he preached at North Falmouth, Mass., 1888-90, and at East Granby, Conn., from 
1890 until his death. 

Rev. Dr. G. R. Leavitt, of Cleveland, Ohio (Class of 1863), writes : " He 
was a man of strong mind, of intense convictions, of a warm heart. More 



55 

clearly than many of us, his brethren, he saw the nature of the ministry as 
a saving work. He loved to preach and to do personal work, and in his 
later years, sanctified by heavy trials, returned to the service and died in the 
harness." 

He was married, August 14, 1855, to Sarah Elizabeth Carkin, of Brookfield, 
Mass., daughter of Luther Carkin and Jane Crockett. She died August 27, 
1884. Their three sons are all living. 

Mr. Woodworth died of heart failure, following la grippe, at East Granby, 
Conn., June 27, 1891, aged sixty- five years. 



CLASS OF 1862. 

Edwin Spencer Beard. 

Son of Rev. Spencer Field Heard (Class of 1S27) and Lucy Allen Leonard; 
born in Methuen, Mass., May 15, 1832; graduated at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, 1855, and at Yale College, 1859, having spent the freshman and sopho- 
more years at Amherst College; took the full theological course at Andover. 
He was licensed to preach by th nth Association at Salem, January 7, 

1S62, and began service with the Second Presbyterian Church of Eastham;)ton, 
L.I. (village of Amagansett), soon after graduation. He remained there a year, 
being ordained, April 2, 1S63, ' )V tne Long Island Consociation, at Riverhead, 
L.I., where he had united with the church in his boyhood. From 1864 to 1873 
he was pastor of the church in Warren, Me., and from 1873 to his death in 
Brooklyn, Conn. 

He published two sermons — a Fast Day sermon, delivered at Warren, 
Me., at the close of the War of the Rebellion in 1865, and a Thanksgiving ser- 
mon, preached also at Warren, in 1876, on The Future of Maine, Rev. S. E. 
Herrick, D.D., of Boston, writes: " He was true as steel, generous and char- 
itable, thinking no evil. He was exceedingly modest in his estimate of himself. 
It would have been a grand bargain to have taken him at his own price, and dis- 
posed of him at the appraisal of any who knew him as well as I did. He was 
nothing for show, but everything for substance — not one minutest shred of 
sham in his make-up." 

He was married, June 2, 1884, to Mary Emma Bard, of Brooklyn, Conn., 
daughter of George J. Bard and Emily D. Hawkes, who survives him. 

Mr. Beard died of pneumonia, following la grippe, at Brooklyn, Conn., 
December 25, 1891, in his sixtieth year. 

George Constantine, D.D. 

Son of Constantine Kyriakon; born in Athens, Greece, January I, 1833; 
came to America in 1850; prepared for college at Richmond, Va., and at East 
Windsor Hill (Conn.) Academy ; graduated at Amherst College, 1859; took 
the full course in this Seminary, 1859-62 ; was licensed by the Essex South 
Association at Salem, January 7, 1862. He was ordained at Amherst, Mass., 
September 10, 1862, as a foreign missionary, and returned to Greece under the 
auspices of the American and Foreign Christian Union, arriving at Athens on 
his thirtieth birthday, January 1, 1863. From 1872 to 1880 he labored inde- 
pendently in Athens; but in 1881 removed to Smyrna, where, in connection with 
the mission of the American Board, and as president of the Greek Alliance, he 



56 

carried on an important work among the Greeks of that city and of Asia 
Minor, as well as among his countrymen In Constantinople. 

He edited at Athens for several years The Athena'is, a weekly periodical for 
young people ; and published, also in modern Greek, Commentary of the Gos- 
pels (in two volumes), Dictio?iary of the Bible, tracts on The Character of Jesus 
Christ (for educated people), on The Greek Church, and on Sunday, its Influ- 
ence on Health and National Prosperity (with introduction by Mr. Gladstone), 
and many other small books which he wrote or translated, one of which was 
Thayer's Pioneer Boy (life of Abraham Lincoln). He was United States Vice 
Consul at Athens, 1864-74, an d> at various times, acting Consul at the Piraeus. 
Bates College gave him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1883. 

Mr. Constantine's early history was remarkable, if not romantic: catching 
the " American spirit " in the classes of Dr. King (for whom his father worked 
in some capacity) ; secretly leaving his native land upon a Swedish vessel, 
with only thirty drachmas ; landing in New York City an utter stranger, after- 
wards finding his way to Boston, and at last to Cambridge, by repeating two 
words, Sophocles and Comber ; learning the English alphabet in the tailor's shop 
where he worked; providentially led to begin a course of study, in which he 
persevered until prepared to return to Greece as a messenger of the gospel. 
His Christian life was one of unceasing activity, from his zealous labor in 
mission schools near Amherst College until the day when his boat was over- 
turned in the Black Sea when attempting, in rough weather, to land at Trebizond 
on his way to a meeting of Greek Christians at Ordoo — a shock from which he 
never recovered. Dr. M. M. Dana, of Lowell, a college classmate, writes : " I 
knew him intimately, and can bear witness to his unostentatious piety, his 
quenchless zeal, his love for souls, and his untiring efforts to publish the gospel 
to his own people. His was a brave and useful life, with the lights and shadows 
born of trial and opposition, but pervaded from first to last with the spirit of 
Him whom he followed with a courage and devotion that have rarely been 
surpassed." 

Mr. Constantine was married, August 15, 1862, to Susan Amanda Fall, of 
Charlestown, daughter of Parker Fall and Dorothy Stuart. She died at Smyrna, 
October 15, 1887. Two sons died in infancy; two daughters have their home 
in Boston, the elder being a classical teacher. Mr. Constantine married, June 
24, 1889, Maud Grimston, an English lady engaged in missionary service at 
Smyrna, who still continues her work in the " Smyrna Rest." 

He died of eczema, at Harrogate, England, October 6, 1891, at the age of 
fifty-eight years. 

CLASS OF 1863. 

Albert Ira Dutton. 

Son of Ira Dutton and Emmeline Dutton; born in Stowe, Vt., August 5, 
1831 ; prepared for college at West Randolph (Vt.) Academy; graduated at 
Middlebury College, 1858; was principal successively of Missisquoi Academy, 
North Troy, Vt., Topsfield (Mass.) Academy, and Georgetown (Mass.) High 
School; studied in the Theological Institute of Connecticut, East Windsor, 
1860-62 ; and graduated at this Seminary in 1863. He was licensed to preach, 
June 3, 1862, by the Tolland County Association, at Tolland, Conn. He was 
ordained pastor of the church in Shirley, Mass., November 11, 1863, and re- 
mained there six years, going then to East Longmeadow, Mass., where he was 



57 

pastor for sixteen years, until 1885. Preaching in that year for a few months 
in Marshall, Minn., he returned to the East, and was acting pastor at Royalton, 
Vt., 1S85-87. Mr. Button's health was now so much enfeebled, as the result of 
injuries received while driving — first during his pastorate in Longmeadow and 
afterwards at Royalton — that he retired from pastoral service; but from 1888 
to 1890 was superintendent of Mr. R. L. Day's Home for Disabled Clergymen 
at South Framingham, continuing to reside there after the enterprise was dis- 
continued. 

Mr. Dutton served at two different times in the United States Christian 
Commission during the War of the Rebellion, the hospital train with which he 
was connected being at Appomattox Court House at the time of the surrender 
of Lee's army. He was a trustee of Monson (Mass.) Academy, and a member 
of the Connecticut Pastoral Union controlling the Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary. A former parishioner writes : "His fidelity to his Master and devotion 
to his service have left a lasting impression on the characters of all with whom 
he labored." 

He was married, October 29, 1863, to Helen Abby Reed, of Groveland, 
Mass., daughter of Jacob Whittemore Reed and Ruhamah B. Tenney, who sur- 
vives him, with two sons and a daughter, another daughter having died in 
infancy. The eldest son, Rev. Charles H. Dutton, graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege in 1SS7, and is a settled pastor in Ashland, Mass. The daughter is a 
graduate of Mt. Holyoke College, 1891. 

Mr. Dutton died of heart failure, following bronchitis, in South Framing- 
ham, Mass., February 14, 1892, aged sixty years. 



GLASS OF 1866. 

Elbridge Gerry. 

Son of Joel Pratt and Eunice Bolton ; born in Braintree, Vt., July 5, 1837; 
his parents dying in his childhood, he was brought up by others, and when he 
reached his majority had his name changed by the Legislature from Elbridge 
Gerry Pratt to Elbridge Gerry; prepared for college at the academy in West 
Randolph (Vt.), where he went to live at the age of sixteen; graduated at Mid- 
dlebury College, 1862; in the Seminary, 1863-66; was licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Geo. Pierce, Jr., at Dracut, February 13, 
1866. After two years' service with the church in Sterling, Mass., he was or- 
dained at West Randolph, Vt., September 24, 1868, as home missionary, and 
went at once to Oregon City, Ore., where he remained until 1872. He was then 
acting pastor at Bethel, Vt., from 1872 to 1882, and spent one year, 1882-83, 
with his former charge in Oregon. Returning to Vermont, he settled in West 
Randolph, and continued to reside there afterwards, although supplying the 
church in Rochester for two years, 1886-1888, the church in Braintree several 
summers, and other churches in the vicinity very often. 

Having been employed in a newspaper office when a student, he retained 
his interest in journalism, working on the local paper while in Oregon, and, after 
his return to Vermont, being at one time the editor and proprietor of the North- 
field News. For several years previous to his death he conducted the West 
Randolph Herald. That journal says: "Mr. Gerry's personal characteristics 
were those of sterling honesty and extreme industry. It was his habit to stand 



58 

at the case and put in type, without writing, the editorials which have consti- 
tuted an important feature of this paper." In his letter to his class on the 
occasion of its twenty-fifth anniversary, observed in Andover last June, he wrote : 
" My life has been one of almost incessant toil. I have known nothing of vaca- 
tions or holidays; have never been laid aside by sickness." A few weeks after 
" he preached in Brookfield his last sermon, being hardly able to speak." The 
theological portion of his large library he bequeathed to the church in West 
Randolph. 

Mr. Gerry was married, September 24, 1868, to Lucia Lucinda Church, of 
West Randolph, daughter of Horace Church and Lucinda Child, who survives 
him, living with a married daughter, their only child, in that town. 

He died of cancer of the liver, at West Randolph, Vt., December 23, 1891, 
aged fifty-four years. 

CLASS OP 1867. 

Samuel Edwards Evans. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Samuel H. Evans and Mary Puffer ; born in Fitchburg, Mass., 
May 17, 1841 ; prepared for college at Chelsea High School; graduated at 
Harvard College, 1863 ; entered the Seminary in 1863, Dut m tne summer of 
1864 enlisted at Andover in the 60th Massachusetts Regiment for one hundred 
days' service in the war; on his return, taught school in Yarmouth, Mass., and 
resumed study in the Seminary, 1865-66; graduated at Chicago Theological 
Seminary, 1867. He was ordained at Chicago, April 18, 1867, w ' tri reference to 
the foreign missionary work, but decided to remain in this country, and was set- 
tled over the church in Seekonk, Mass. (East Providence, R.I.), 1868-71. He 
was then pastor of Methodist churches for ten years : Millville, 1871-72 ; Mystic, 
Conn., 1872-74; Nantucket, 1874-75; Cotuit Port, 1875-77; East Glastonbury, 
Conn., 1877-79; North Easton, 1879-80; Dighton, 1880-81. Returning then 
to Congregationalist pastorates, he preached at Middlefield, 1881-82; Hanover, 
1882-86; Duxbury, 1887; Alstead and Langdon, N.H., 1888-90; First Church, 
West Newbury, 1890-91. 

Mr. Evans preached his last sermon at West Newbury in February, 1891, 
in great feebleness of body, from the words : " Come unto Me, all ye that labor 
and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." 

He was married, November 20, 1867, to Mary Haven Locke, of Boston, 
daughter of John Goodwin Locke and Jane Ermina Starkweather. She survives 
him, with two daughters and one son. 

He died at the Soldiers' Home in Chelsea, Mass., of disease of heart and 
kidneys, November 16, 1891, aged fifty years. 



CLASS OP 1868. 

Samuel Wells Powell. {No n- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Oliver Stanley Powell (pastor of Congregational church at Fort 
Atkinson, Wis.) and Judith Shaler; born in Phillipsville (now Belmont), N.Y., 
May 6, 1838 ; prepared for college at Beloit, Wis., and studied in Beloit College 
(Class of 1863) until the outbreak of the war ; private in 4th Wisconsin Regi- 
ment, detailed as private secretary of Gen. John A. Dix at Fort McHenry, 



59 

and afterwards lieutenant in United States Marine Corps; in this Seminary, 
1865-66; in Chicago Theological Seminary, 1866-67; m Vale Divinity School, 
1867-6S. After two years of home missionary service in Iowa and Wisconsin, 
1869-71, he was pastor of the Congregational church at Arena, Wis., 1871-72, 
being ordained there, Februarys, 1S72. He was stated supply at Viroqua, Wis., 
with three other preaching stations, 1S72-73; Rio and Wyocena, Wis., 1S73-74; 
Medford, Minn., and two other preaching stations, 1S74-75; South Plymouth, 
Mass., 1876-77; Rochester, Mass., 1S77 ; Harwich, Mass., 1S79; Mt. Washing- 
ton, Mass., 18S0; Madrid, X.Y., 1SS1-S2; residing afterwards in Brooklyn, 
X.Y., engaged in literary work, until his installation over the church in Otis, 
Mass., November 15, 1887. From 1SS9 to 1891 he preached at Peru, Mass., 
removing in the fall of 1891 to Chester Centre, Mass. 

Mr. Powell is said to have been specially noted while an officer in the 
Marine Corps under Admiral Farragut for his efficiency in handling heavy 
artillery. He was a fine linguist, and before his ordination served for short 
periods as teacher of Hebrew in the Baptist and Presbyterian theological semi- 
naries at Chicago. He gave special attention to ancient history, and published 
a chart for the use of Pible students on the Kin ! and Judah, but left 

incomplete a history of the period between David and the Babylonian captivity. 
He was much interested in the preservation of the Adirondacks and other 
forests, and translated from the French The Forest Waters the Farm. He con- 
tributed largely to magazines and newspapers, secular and religious, and for 
several years before his death had represented the Associated Press in reporting 
religious conventions. 

He was married, September 16, 1869, to Letia A. Hopkins, of Bowen's 
Prairie, Io., who survives him, without children. 

He died of Bright's disease and general debility, at Chester Centre, Mass., 
May 7, 1S92, at the age of fifty-four years. 

CLASS OF 1869. 

Edward Payson Smith, Ph.D. {Xon-graduate.) 

Son of Samuel Smith and Lucina Metcalf ; born in Middlefield, Mass., 
January 20, 1S40; prepared for college under tuition of his brothers, Azariah 
and Judson Smith, at home, and at Lewistown (Penn.) Academy; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1865; principal of High School, Hinsdale, Mass., 1865-67; 
studied in Oberlin Theological Seminary, 1867, an d in this Seminary, 1867-68; 
teacher of Latin and Greek, Williston Seminary, 1868-70; studied at the Uni- 
versity of Halle, 1870-71 ; going abroad again in 1872 for a few months' special 
study in Paris. On his return he became professor of Modern Languages in the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (then the Worcester County Free Institute of 
Industrial Science), and remained such until his death, having, also, from 1888, 
the department of Political Science. Under leave of absence he pursued a 
special course of study at Johns Hopkins University, 1887-88. 

Professor Smith received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Syra- 
cuse University in 1888. His historical address at the centennial anniversary 
of Middlefield, in 1883, was published, as also a valuable essay in Professor 
Jameson's Constitutional History of the United States in the F'ormative Period. 
Although not entering the ministry as he had designed, he was licensed to 



6o 



preach by the Woburn Association, January 16, 1872, and at various times 
preached in the churches of Worcester and vicinity. As a member and officer 
of the Union Church, as a Bible class instructor, and as an active supporter of 
the Worcester Young Men's Christian Association and Congregational Club, 
his religious influence was widely felt. His ability as an educator was of a high 
order, and his success commensurate with his effort. "Into every sphere of 
life he carried his best thoughts and his most strenuous endeavors. His teach- 
ing aimed to evoke all the latent power a student possessed, and to inspire him 
with a desire of symmetry of character and culture. He loved young men, and 
had no greater delight than in their response to his incentives, and in witnessing 
their mental and spiritual growth." 

Dr. Smith was married, November 26, 186S, to Julia Mack Church, of 
Middlefield, daughter of James Tallmadge Church and Emily Bates. She sur- 
vives him, with one daughter and three sons. 

He died of heart disease, at Worcester, Mass., May 2, 1892, aged fifty-two 
years. 

CLASS OP 1870. 

Lucian Dwight Mears. 

Son of Henry Mears and Louisa Clark ; born in Beloit, Wis., March 29, 
1838; graduated at Beloit College, 1862, having fitted in the preparatory depart- 
ment of the same institution ; was engaged for some years as a civil engineer on 
the Northwestern Railroad in Wisconsin and Iowa; taught German for two 
years in Beloit College ; took the junior year of theological study in Chicago 
Seminary, 1867-6S, and the two following years at Andover. He was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. William E. Park at 
Lawrence, October 19, 1869. He began to supply the church in Sterling, 
Mass., in 1870, and was ordained, November 8, 187 1, as its pastor, continuing 
such for two years. He resided there without charge, 1873-75, and at South 
Lancaster, near by, 1875-76. From 1876 to 1887 he was acting pastor at Dauby, 
Vt., returning in the latter year to his native city, and spending the few remain- 
ing years of his life in the service of Beloit College, being for a time assistant 
librarian, and, until a few months before his death, acting treasurer. 

While in Vermont he represented the town of his residence in the State 
Legislature, and was the founder of its free public library. As the son of one 
of the earliest settlers of Beloit, and himself the first white boy born in the town, 
he was specially fitted to prepare the historical address on the occasion of the 
fiftieth anniversary of the First Congregational Church, in 1888, a work rendered 
very valuable by his painstaking exactness and care. 

He married, January 1, 1873, Harriet Sawyer, of Sterling, Mass., daughter 
of Alfred Sawyer and Sarah A. Goss. She survives him, with one daughter, 
their only child. 

He died of consumption, resulting from la grippe, at Beloit, Wis., Septem- 
ber 29, 180,1, at the age of fifty- three years and six months. 



6i 
CLASS OP 1873. 

Alfred Henry Hall. 

Son of Dea. Samuel Whitney Hall and Margaret Bass Knowlton; born in 
Boston, March 7, 1845; prepared for college at the Roxbury Latin School; 
graduated at Harvard College, 1867 ; was for two years private tutor to a young 
man traveling in Europe, afterwards spending several months of travel in Egypt 
and Palestine with Rev. Dr. Charles S. Robinson; took the full course in this 
Seminary, 1870-73. He was licensed by the Suffolk North Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. Alexander McKenzie, Cambridge, April 16, 1872, and was ordained 
March 4, 1875, as pastor of the First Congregational Church, Meriden, Conn. 
He continued in this pastorate for four years, and after a year spent in 
Boston returned to Meriden to become the pastor of the Centre Church. 
In this charge he remained from 18S0 until his death. 

Mr. Hall was an earnest and influential leader in religious and philanthropic 
work in his city and State, being specially active in the Christian Endeavor 
movement. He was a contributor to the Bibliotheca Sacra, the Sunday School 
Times, and other religious periodicals, and also to the secular press. He 
delivered many lectures before the Meriden Scientific Association, of which 
he was an active member. He published, in 1S84, an address entitled, The 
Mission of the Church to Intelligoice and Wealth. He was one of the American 
delegates to the International Congregational Council at London in 1891, and 
his sermons in connection with the memorable visit to the English Plymouth 
made a deep impression there, recalled since his death by the London Independ- 
ent and Plymouth Mercury. Rev. E. G. Selden, of Springfield, his seminary 
classmate, writes: "Mr. Hall's distinguishable characteristic was his likable- 
ness. He had the rare personal qualities which attract. 1 1 is friendship was 
one of the choicest blessings of life." Rev. Dr. J. W. Cooper, of New Britain 
(Class of 1868), said in his funeral address: "He had the Christian grace of 
cultivated brotherliness — courteous, thoughtful, bright, cheerful, unselfish, 
generous. Along with this, and equally conspicuous, was the native force of 
a manly character. He was a brave, strong, manly man, tenacious of duty, 
chivalrous in devotion, truth-loving, pure, high-minded, determined. He had 
in him true nobility. Life to him was for large thoughts and noble deeds." 

Mr. Hall was married, June 15, 1875, to Mary Delight Twichell, of Plants- 
ville, Conn., daughter of Edward Twichell and Jane Walkly. She survives him, 
with two daughters and one son. 

He died of acute Bright's disease, following la grippe, at Meriden, Conn., 
December 26, 1891, aged forty-six years. 



CLASS OP 1875. 
Austin Hannahs Burr. 

Son of Rev. Willard Burr and Sarah Almira Burr; born in Charlestown, 
Ohio, June 18, 1849; prepared for college at Oberlin, Ohio; graduated at 
Oberlin College, 187 1 ; instructor in mathematics one year in Fisk University, 
Nashville, Tenn. ; in this Seminary, 1872-75; licensed by the Andover Associa- 
tion at South Lawrence, June 23, 1874. He was ordained November 3, 1875, 
as pastor of the church at Franklin, N.H., where he remained five years; from 
1880 to 1885 he was pastor of the West Church, Andover, Mass., and from 1885 



62 



to 1889 at Peterboro, N.H. His health then failing, he spent a year and a half 
in rest and travel, in his native State, in the South, and in Colorado, doing 
home missionary work for a time in the latter State at Highland Lake, and at 
Harman, a suburb of Denver. In the fall of 1890 he became acting pastor of 
the church in Mystic, Conn., earnestly laboring there until obliged to desist 
from labor a year later. In all his life and work he proved himself " a model 
of truth, of diligent integrity, faithful in his stewardship, and in every sense a 
strong, loyal patriot." 

He was married, December 30, 1875, to Fannie Towne Hammond, of 
Andover, daughter of William G. Hammond and Frances Thais Albee, who 
survives him, with four sons and two daughters, an infant daughter having died 
in 1888. 

Mr. Burr died of consumption, December 5, 1891, at Demorest, Ga., whither 
he had gone a few weeks before for a change of climate, aged forty- two years. 



CLASS OP 1887. 

Henry Alfred Frederick. 

Son of John Frederick and Lydia Heffner ; born in Cedarville (now Congo), 
Douglass township, Penn., August 10, 1854; studied in Phillips Academy, 
Andover, 1879-82, and in Johns Hopkins University, 1883-84; took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1884-87 ; was licensed by the Essex South and Salem 
Association, May 18, 1886; was acting pastor of the church in Croydon, N. H., 
1887-90, being ordained there, June 19, 1889. His health beginning to fail, he 
relinquished labor there, and returned to Andover for a year of study, 1890-9 r, 
in the advanced class. He was able to reach his Pennsylvania home, and to 
preach once after arriving there ; but although confidently hoping soon to accept 
a call to pastoral work in Ohio, his strength never rallied. The Christian faith, 
which he was not permitted to preach to others, made his death one of joyful 
expectation. 

He died of consumption, at Congo, Penn., February 3, 1892, aged thirty- 
seven years. He was unmarried. 



William Jenks Skelton. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Warren Skelton and Mary Ingraham Morton; born in Charlestown, 
Mass., August 15, 1856; began his preparation for the ministry by studying 
evenings, while at work in the watch factory at Waltham, and continued it at 
Oberlin College; spent two years in this Seminary, 1884-86; was licensed by 
the Essex South and Salem Association at Salem, May 18, 1886; preached for 
a time at Alna, Me., as he had done in the summer of 1885; began pastoral 
service at West Brooksville, Me., in January, 1887, and was ordained there, 
September 13, 1887. For the first six months of 1888 he had charge of a home 
missionary church at Buffalo, Wyoming Territory. Returning to Maine, he was 
pastor for two years at Perry, having charge also of the church at Pembroke. 
In the fall of 1890 he entered the senior class of Bangor Theological Seminary, 
but was compelled by failing health to seek a Southern climate, and supplied the 



63 

church connected with the American Missionary Association at Wilmington, 
N.C., from January to June, 1891. 

M His last day's work in Wilmington was characteristic of the man. On that 
dav he baptized and received into the church eighteen members, after that rode 
eight miles and administered the sacrament to an old man, and at midnight 
started for his home in the North. He everywhere gave himself in a most 
whole-hearted manner to his work, toiling to the extreme limit of endurance. 
Everywhere his enthusiasm, perseverance, and cordiality gained the friendship 
of the people, and everywhere the work prospered under his hands." 

He was married, November 8, i8S7,to Julia Ella Farnham, of West Brooks- 
ville, Me., daughter of Gershom Farnham and Rubie Rea Farnham. She sur- 
vives him, with a son and daughter. 

He died of consumption, at West Brooksville, Me., September 7, 1891, at 
the age of thirty-five years. 



NAMES NOT PREVIOUSLY REPORTED. 



CLASS OF 1830. 



James Taylor Dickinson. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Horace Dickinson and Mary Ann Taylor; born in Lowville, N.Y., 
October 27, 1806; graduated at Yale College, 1826; studied law at Montreal, 
where his parents then resided, 1826-27; in this Seminary, 1S27-29 ; graduated 
at Yale Divinity School, 1830. He was licensed by the Litchfield (Conn.) South 
Association, in 1839, and preached for a time at Burlington, Vt. He was 
ordained April 4, 1832, as pastor of the Second Congregational Church in 
Norwich, Conn. He resigned this charge two years later in order to enter the 
foreign field. After a year of medical study in Bowdoin and Harvard Medical 
Colleges, he joined the Singapore Mission of the American Board in 1835, re- 
maining in it until 1840, and in the Singapore Institution as teacher until the 
close of 1843. After his return to the United States, he se'tled in Middlefield, 
Conn., and resided there until his death, teaching, studying, lecturing, and 
preaching, as his health permitted. 

While at the Singapore Mission Mr. Dickinson made an important voyage 
of exploration among the islands of the Indian Archipelago (where Munson and 
Lyman, of the Class of 1832, had been murdered three years before), which he 
reported in the Missionary Herald. He also contributed an article on the 
Malay language to Appletons* Encyclopedia, other articles to the Christian Ex- 
aminer and the Chinese Repository, and wrote a short memoir of his brother-in- 
law, Rev. George W. Perkins (Class of 1829). He gave 15,000 volumes of his 
library and a fund of $50,000 to Yale College. 

He was married, November 21, 1832, to Mary Hick ok, of Burlington, Vt., 
daughter of Samuel Hickok and Elizabeth Vv 7 helpley. She died April 6, 1834. 



6 4 

He married, second, May 15, 1845, Sarah Comstock Lyman, of Middlefield, 
daughter of William Lyman and Alma Coe, who survived him. 

He died of paralysis, at Middlefield, Conn., July 22, 1884, in his seventy- 
eighth year. 

CLASS OF 1834. 

Elias Loom is, LL.D. {Non-graduate .) 

Son of Rev. Hubbel Loomis and Jerusha Burt; born in Willington, Conn., 
August 7, 181 1 ; fitted for college with his father; graduated at Yale College, 
1830; instructor in Mathematics in Mt. Hope Institution, Baltimore, Md., 1830- 
31 ; in this Seminary, 1831-33 (from Alton, 111., where his father then resided); 
tutor in Yale College, 1833-36; professor of Mathematics and Natural Philos- 
ophy, Western Reserve College, 1836-44, spending the first year in study 
abroad; professor of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy in the 
University of the City of New York, 1844-48; professor of Natural Philosophy, 
College of New Jersey, 1848-49; returned then to New York and occupied his 
former professorship there until i860; succeeded Professor Olmsted in the 
professorship of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy in Yale College, which he 
occupied from i860 until his death. 

Professor Loomis was the author of a well-known and very successful series 
of text-books in higher mathematics, natural philosophy, and astronomy, and 
contributed many learned articles to the American Journal of Science and Arts, 
and to other scientific publications. He was the first American who saw 
Halley's comet on its return in August, 1835. Under the auspices of the United 
States Coast Survey he first used the electric telegraph to determine the differ- 
ence of longitude between New York and other cities, and thus the velocity of 
the electric current. He devised the income of $300,000 for the ultimate use 
of the Astronomical Observatory of Yale University in making and publishing 
astronomical observations. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from 
the University of the City of New York in 1854. 

He was married, May 14, 1840, to Julia E. Upson, of Tallmadge, Ohio, who 
died June 13, 1854. Their two sons are graduates of Yale College, and the 
elder, professor of Physics in Cornell University. 

Professor Loomis died at New Haven, Conn., August 15, 1889, aged 
seventy-eight years. 

Seth Hardin Waldo. [Non- graduate.) 

Son of John Elderkin Waldo and Beulah Foster ; born in Hampton, Conn., 
October 4, 1802; graduated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1827, and at Am- 
herst College, 1831 ; in the Seminary, 1831-34, being assistant instructor one 
year, 1832-33, in the English Department of Phillips Academy (" Teachers' 
Seminary"); principal of Oberlin Collegiate Institute, 1834-35; preached for 
short periods successively at Mansfield, Ravenna, and Kinsman, Ohio, 1835-36; 
lectured at Farmington, Ohio, 1836-37, and was acting pastor there, 1837-42, in 
the mean time being ordained as an evangelist at Reading, Mass., by the Woburn 
Association, August 6, 1839. He supplied, from 1842 to 1854, churches in Ash- 
tabula, Dover, and Bellevue, Ohio, besides teaching in the Grand River Insti- 
tute in Ashtabula County, and at Bellevue. In 1854 he removed to Geneseo, 



65 

111., and resided there until his death. For three years he was pastor of the 
Congregational church and teacher in the Geneseo Seminary. He afterwards 
opened a private classical school, meantime serving one year as Presbyterial 
missionary, and preaching in various churches, especially at Vienna, 111., 1859- 
60, and at Gardner, 111., 1860-61. 

During nearly all of Mr. Waldo's ministerial life, both in the Western Re- 
serve and in Illinois, he served simultaneously as preacher and teacher. While 
teaching at Oberlin, great revivals followed his preaching there, "and in a town 
some twelve miles distant." While lecturing on Moral and Intellectual Philos- 
ophy at Farmington Academy, in the winter of 1836-37, his hearers were so 
much aroused by his teaching on Conscience that " lecturing was waived to give 
place to preaching." In his last years he continued to teach "a small school 
every winter, and even in the summer vacation preceding his death he had one 
pupil come every clay to read Latin." When seventy-nine years old he pub- 
lished a New Grammatical Method for the Use of Schools. A Geneseo paper 
said: "His kindly spirit, scholarly taste, and devoted life will be one of the 
chief treasures of our city. He desired to be known as the Preceptor and 
Friend of Youth. This motto ought to be put on his tomb." 

Mr. Waldo was married, April n, 1834, to Abiah Spofford, of Andover 
(North Parish), Mass., daughter of Moody Spofford and Dolly Farnum. She 
died November 15, 1881, and he married, second, March 28, 1882, Mrs. Amelia 
S. Green, of Albion, N.Y., daughter of Orra Clark, and widow of Eri A. 
Green, who survives him. He had no children. 

He died of hemorrhage of the bladder, at Geneseo, 111., October 30, 1890, 
aged eighty- eight years. 

CLASS OF 1840. 

Henry Callahan. 

Son of Robert Callahan and Dorcas Pettengill ; born in Andover (North 
Parish), Mass., January 5, 181 1; graduated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
1832, and at Union College, 1836; taught in Tamworth, N.H., 1836-37; took 
the full course in this Seminary, 1837-40; was licensed by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Rev. John C. Phillips, Methuen, October 6, 1840; taught 
in Cazenovia, N.Y., and preached in the vicinity of Schenectady, and at Evans, 
N.Y., 1840-43. He was pastor of the Presbyterian church in Niagara Falls, 
N.Y., 1843-49, and of the Congregational church in Oxford, N.Y., 1850-62. 
He was chaplain of the 114th New York Regiment in the War of the Rebellion. 
Returning from this service, he was acting pastor of the Presbyterian church in 
Franklin, N.Y., for two years, and also instructor of Latin and History in Dela- 
ware Literary Institute at the same place. He then opened in Franklin a home 
school for boys, called the Callahan Institute, which he maintained for fourteen 
years. 

His service in war time in the charge of a large hospital in New Orleans 
was one of special usefulness, although it seriously undermined his health. 
"A warm-hearted, loyal Christian gentleman — such is the summing up of his 
character." 

Mr. Callahan was married, May 9, 1843, to Mary Ann Allis, of Cazenovia, 
N.Y., who survives him, with four sons, a daughter having died in childhood. 

He died of Bright's disease, at Franklin, N.Y., February 7, 1888, aged 
seventy-seven years. 



66 



Gideon Southward Johnson. 

Son of Daniel Johnson and Sarah Alden ; born in Haverhill, Mass., April 
25, 1810; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1835; H1 tne Seminary, 1835-36 and 
1838-40, being, in the mean time, principal of Fairhaven (Mass.) Academy, 1836- 
38; was licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. 
Jackson, Andover, April 7, 1840. He was ordained at Haverhill, September 13, 
1841, and labored as home missionary in Lucas and Fulton counties, Ohio, 1848- 
51, and was pastor of churches at Seward and Pecatonica, 111., 1851-55. He 
was then compelled by the failure of his voice to discontinue preaching, and 
resided without charge at Pecatonica until 185S, at Rockford, 111., until 1867, 
and afterwards in the town of Marion, 111., being postmaster successively at 
Hale and at Stillman Valley from 1867 until his death. 

He was married, May 25, 1841, to Mary White Jones, of Spencer, Mass., 
daughter of Dr. Asa Jones and Lucy Dunbar. She died November 8, 1857, 
and he married, second, October 22, i860, Julia A. Woodward, of Warrens- 
burgh, N.Y., daughter of David Woodward and Annie McDonald, who sur- 
vived him. Of eight children, three are living. 

Mr. Johnson died of malignant corn, at Stillman Valley, 111., December 25, 
1888, in the seventy-ninth year of his age. 

CLASS OP 1857. 

Abner Leavenworth Train. {Non-graditate.) 

Son of Rev. Asa Milton Train (Class of 1829) and Lucia Leavenworth; 
born in Milford, Conn., September 16, 1830; prepared for college at Williston 
Seminary; graduated at Yale College, 1853; studied law with Hon. John 
Hooker, Hartford, Conn., 1853-54, and after a year in this Seminary, 1854-55, 
resumed that study, 1855-56; was admitted to the Bar in 1857; practiced for 
a short time in Hartford, and then in Milford; was private secretary of Hon. 
Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, 1862-63; and Deputy Collector of the 
Port of New Haven, 1864-65. He was associate editor of the New Haven 
Journal and Courier for one year, and an editor and proprietor of the New 
Haven Daily Palladium from 1865 to 1873. He resided in New York City 
afterward, but spent two years of study and observation in Europe. In 1886 he 
was appointed secretary of the Forestry Commission of the State of New York, 
in which position he continued until his death. 

Mr. Train was Clerk of the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1858, 
and a member of the same body from Milford in 1861 and 1862. He compiled 
and edited the history of his college class. He took great interest in music, 
prepared a lecture on " Wagner and his Music," and at one time was secretary 
of a prominent musical society in New York City, which was under the leadership 
of Dr. Damrosch. " He was a man of rare qualities of head and heart. He 
was of a modest nature, rather distrustful of his own abilities, and this, together 
with a somewhat delicate physique, prevented his taking so prominent a position 
before the public as was commensurate with his ability and varied knowledge." 

He was married, March 17, 1863, to Susan Atwater Bull, of Milford, 
daughter of Allen C. Bull and Julia Smith. She died July 22, 1870; two chil- 
dren died in infancy, and a married daughter resides in New Haven. 

Mr. Train died of heart failure, induced by rheumatism, at Albany, N.Y., 
February 10, 1891, aged sixty years. 



6; 



Forty- six names are recorded in the preceding lists, the same number as 
last year. Six of them belong to the record of previous years, but have not pre- 
viously been reported. The average age of the forty-six men is sixty-nine 
seven months, and twenty-one days. Thirteen of the number had passed the 
age of fourscore years; thirteen were between seventy and eighty; and all, save 
four, were over fifty. In at least nine cases death resulted from la grippe. As 
regards Seminary classes, the list extends from Dr. Addison Kingsbury, who 
left Andover in 1828, to Mr. Frederick, who, as member of the Advanced Class, 
attended these anniversaries one year ago. 

Twenty- nine were full graduates, fifteen were non-graduates, and two, resi- 
dent licentiates. All of the forty-six men had previously pursued a course of 
study in collegiate institutions, although in a very few cases the course had not 
been completed. Twelve came from Amherst; six from Vale; six from Mid- 
dlebury; five from Dartmouth; three from Harvard; two each from Williams, 
Oberlin, and Beloit; and one each from Bowdoin, Brown, Columbia, Johns 
Hopkins, Union, and the Universities of New York, Pennsylvania, and Vermont. 

The names of many will be readily recognized, as those of Drs. Backus, 
Skinner, and Wood, of the Presbyterian Church ; Professor Shackford, of the 
Unitarian Church; Professor Aiken, the eminent scholar; Professor Loomis, 
the distinguished scientist; and President Blanchard, the vigorous reformer. 
Others, like Dr. Spalding, Mr. Hathaway, and Mr. Tuck, have been well known 
in New England pastorates. Four, including the lamented Constantine, were 
foreign missionaries ; and a still larger number, like Mr. Peet and Mr. Waldo, 
endured hardness in the no less important work of laying foundations in the 
then obscure home missionary fields of the West. A few have been stricken 
down — like Professor Smith, of Worcester, Alfred H.Hall and Austin H. 
Burr — in the prime of life's work. All were earnest men, and their works do 
follow them. 

Mr. Isaac Watts Wheelwright, of South Byfield, Mass., of the class of 
1825, is still our senior alumnus, although Rev. William Withington, a non- 
graduate of the preceding class, and Rev. Peter Kimball, a graduate of the 
succeeding class, are both living, the latter being now in his one hundredth year. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 




NECROLOGY, 



1892-93. 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 14th, 1893, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. J. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset St. 
1893. 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



Rev. James G. Merrill, D.D., Moderator, 18Q2. 

Rev. Prof. Edward Y. Hincks, D.D., "1 

Rev. Edward S. Tead, I Committee > 

Rev. Henry J. Patrick, D.D., 18Q2-93. 

Rev. B. M. Fullerton, D.D., J 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Secretary, i8g2-Q$. 



NOTICE. 



This Obituary Record is published annually in connection 
with the meeting of the Alumni Association at the June anni- 
versaries. Alumni are earnestly requested to aid in its prepara- 
tion by communicating the fact of the death of any past member 
of the Seminary, together with any newspaper notices or memorial 
sketches. These, with change of address, or other information 
relating to the record of living alumni, should be sent to the 
Secretary at Andover. 



INDEX. 



Class. Age. Page. 

1871. Charles D. Barrows, D.D 48 93 

1842. Hiram Bingham 77 84 

1842. Edwin E. Bliss, D.D 75 81 

1856. Horatio N. Burton, D.D 66 88 

1838. Daniel Butler 84 78 

1861. S. Russell Butler 55 91 

1838. Charles Dame 81 79 

1852. Obed Dickinson 74 87 

1842. Justin Field 76 84 

1832. Albert W. Fiske 90 76 

1846. James Fletcher 69 85 

1836. Kendall Flint, M.D 85 77 

1849. Henry M. Goodwin, D.D 72 87 

1838. Stephen S. N. Greeley 79 79 

1841. Henry L. Hammond 78 80 

i860. Henry C. Hitchcock 57 89 

1870. Francis T. Ingalls, D.D 48 92 

1826. Peter Kimball 99 75 

1838. Eliezer J. Marsh 81 80 

1848. Joseph T. Noyes 74 85 

1848. Hezekiah D. Perry 74 86 

1879. Silas A. Potter, M.D 38 94 

i860. A. Hastings Ross, D.D 62 90 

1842. Alfred Stevens, D.D 82 82 

1842. Eliphalet Y. Swift 77 83 

1856. Joseph H. Tyler 67 89 

1862. Lorenzo J. White 64 92 

1824. William Withington 93 74 

1835. Isaac R. Worcester, M.D 83 76 

Trustee. 

Edward Taylor 76 73 

Not Previously Reported. 

1832. William P. Apthorp 77 94 

1840. Moses M. Smart, M.D 72 95 



IsTEOI^OLOGir 



TRUSTEE. 

Edward Taylor. 

Son of Jonathan Taylor and Harmony Brewster ; born in Chester Village 
(now a part of Huntington), Mass., March 29, 1817, the family, however, re- 
moving in his infancy to Westfield ; studied in Lenox and Westfield Academies 
with the purpose of entering college and fitting for the ministry, but was pre- 
vented by his health from doing so. When eighteen years old he entered busi- 
ness in Boston as a bookkeeper, and in 1839 came to Andover to fill the same 
position in the Marland Manufacturing Company. There he continued, with 
the exception of two years' service as the cashier of the Andover Bank, 1843-45, 
until his election to the office of treasurer of Phillips Academy and the Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1868, as successor to Dr. John L. Taylor, who then became 
Smith professor in the Special Course in the Seminary. The responsible duties 
of this position he performed for twenty- one years, retiring in feeble health in 
1889, although remaining on the board of trustees, to which he had been elected 
in 1867, unt il his death. 

During his fifty- four years of residence in Andover he was called to many 
offices of trust. For ten years, including the trying period of the War of the 
Rebellion, he was town treasurer, and for nine of the ten years town clerk. 
In 1866 and 1869 he represented Andover and North Andover in the Legislature. 
For thirty years, 1859-89, he was by election of the town a trustee of the Pun- 
chard Free School, and for eleven years, 1859-70, a trustee of Abbot Academy. 
He was for many years director of the Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany and of the Andover National Bank, and for ten years president of the latter 
institution. In 1842 he united with the South Church by letter from the Bow- 
doin Street Church, Boston, and for the half century since has been most heartily 
and helpfully identified with its material and spiritual interests. He was one 
of its deacons for twenty- five years, superintendent of the Sabbath school fifteen 
years, for many years one of the church committee, and for over forty years 
treasurer of the historic Ministerial Fund of the parish. 

Descended on one side from Rev. Edward Taylor, an early nonconformist 
English emigrant and the first minister of Westfield, and on the other from 
Elder Brewster of the Plymouth Pilgrims, Deacon Taylor exemplified the sturdy 
Puritan and Pilgrim traits of character, moral and spiritual. He believed in 
God and desired to serve him. He carried his religious conscientiousness and 
faithfulness into his business and his benevolence. No one ever doubted for a 
moment his strict honesty and truthfulness. What he thought it right to do, 
what he had said he would do, that he was sure to do. When he was in the 
Legislature the members of the House voted themselves an extra compensation 
of two hundred dollars. He believed this to be wrong, and sent one hundred 
dollars to each of the towns he represented, with a modest note saying that he 
was "in receipt of a larger compensation than met his approval," and asking 



74 

them to expend the annual income of the amount " towards furnishing fuel for 
some worthy ones " needing such provision. He gave very unostentatiously 
but liberally during his life, it being his plan to devote one quarter of his income 
to benevolence. Scholarships in Phillips and Abbot Academies bear respec- 
tively the names of Jonathan Taylor and Harmony Brewster. He left by be- 
quest about ten thousand dollars to benevolent societies and educational insti- 
tutions, with Phillips Academy and the Congregational Church Building Society 
as residuary legatees. 

In a memorial sketch of Mr. Taylor, Principal C. F. P. Bancroft (Class of 
1867) wrote : " With strong convictions and great strictness in his own life, he 
had a real sympathy for others and a liberal temper towards the opinions and 
the conduct of his fellow men. Reserved of speech and undemonstrative in 
manner, he could on occasion speak with convincing directness and honesty, 
and he often showed a depth of interest and feeling which was stronger than 
words. He commanded the confidence of all ; he had many and true friend- 
ships; intimacies he had none. . . . Above all, his Christian principles and 
consistent conduct and character made him a power in the community and a 
blessing to the world." 

Mr. Taylor died at Andover, of general debility, May 21, 1893, aged seventy- 
six years. He was never married. 



ALUMNI. 



CLASS OP 1824. 

William Withington. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Joseph Weeks Withington and Elizabeth White; born in Dor- 
chester, Mass., October 28, 1798; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover; graduated at Harvard College, 1821 ; in this Seminary, 1821-24. 
He was ordained as deacon by Bishop Griswold, September 26, 1824, and 
as priest by the same, September 10, 1840. Although a man of fine talent 
and scholarship, Mr. Withington's health was not strong, and his parochial 
charges were few and of brief duration. He officiated in St. John's Church, 
Ashfield, Mass., 1824-25, returning there for two years' service, 1850-52; he was 
rector of Christ Church at Clappville (now Rochdale) in Leicester, Mass., 
1839-41; of St. Paul's Church, Hopkinton, Mass., 1848-49; and of Christ 
Church, Swansea, Mass., 1853-56. He was for a short time diocesan mission- 
ary in Michigan, and chaplain of the Legislature of that State in 1859. At other 
times he usually resided in Dorchester, quietly devoting his time to literary 
pursuits. He published Christian Radicalism in 1836, and The Growth of 
Thought as Affecting the Progress of Society in 1851. From 1858 he resided in 
Washington, D.C., and as late as 1881, when in his eighty- third year, took 
charge for several weeks of one of the smaller Episcopal churches in that city. 

He was married, June 9, 1825, to Mary Stacy Frothingham, of Newburyport, 
Mass., daughter of Benjamin Frothingham and Mary Stacy. She died October 
26, 1829, and he married, second, April 5, 1832, Elizabeth Williams Ford, of 
Dorchester, daughter of Joseph Ford and Sarah Foster, who died Decern- 



75 

ber 25, 1891. He had three sons and five daughters; two of the sons and one 
of the daughters are deceased. 

Mr. Withington died of old age, at the home of his son, Gen. William H. 
Withington, in Jackson, Mich., August 31, 1892, in the ninety-fourth year of 
his age. 

GLASS OF 1826. 
Peter Kimball. 

Son of Joseph Kimball and Eunice Atkinson; born in Boscawen, N.H., 
March 5, 1793; while teaching the village school at New Hartford, N.Y., he 
prepared for college under the instruction of Rev. Noah Coe (Class of 181 1) ; 
graduated at Hamilton College, 1822 ; after spending a year in Boston, took the 
full course in this Seminary, 1823-26. He was engaged in home missionary serv- 
ice in Goshen and Marlow, N.H., 1826-27; in Manchester, N.Y., 1827-28; Swe- 
den, N.Y., 1828. He went to Ohio in 1830, and, while supplying the Presbyterian 
Church at Watertown, assisted Rev. L. G. Bingham in the pioneer work which 
resulted in the founding of Marietta College. He was ordained at Watertown, 
August 30, 1831, and remained there until 1833. He preached at Hamburg, N.Y., 
1833-34, and at West Aurora, N. Y., 1834-35. After the death of his wife in 1836 
he removed to Boston, where he resided most of the time from 1838 to 1855. He 
kept for several years a "Writing Academy" on Washington Street, having as 
pupils many who have since become distinguished. For a considerable period 
he did clerical work for the secretaries of the American Board, as also at one time 
for Hon. Charles Sumner. From 1855 he resided with his brother, Rev. Milton 
Kimball (Class of 1829), at Augusta, 111. ; from 1866, in Rochester, N.Y. ; from 
1878, in Cleveland, Ohio; and in 1883 went to the Presbyterian Ministers' House 
at Perth Amboy, N.J., where he spent his remaining years. 

Only about seven years of his long life were engaged in pastoral service, 
"but he seems," writes his nephew, Rev. C. Cotton Kimball, D.D., "never to 
have intermitted the quiet labors of a gracious and useful life. He took great 
interest in youth, and was always writing to his 'boys,' many of whom were 
men of seventy five or eighty years." As late as 1883 he was granted a patent 
for a process which he had invented for changing the bearing years of fruit trees. 
Although " terribly affected in 1859 by a lesion of the heart, so as to be often 
unable to speak or do anything," he outlived all his contemporaries and died in 
his one hundredth year. He attributed his longevity in large part to his entire 
disuse after his youth of ardent spirits, tobacco, and through most of his life of 
tea and coffee. In his youth he was a musician in the New Hampshire militia, 
and the use of the drum and fife which he had practiced in the time of the War 
of 1812 he kept up to the end of life, deeming it beneficial to his lungs and 
heart. 

Not long before his death he wrote : " I do not expect to live so long as I 
might by fifteen or twenty-five years if I had never violated the laws of life. 
I enjoy early rising, read and write by native sight, and taste good food as a 
boy. I rejoice in the assurance of life eternal through our Lord Jesus Christ — 
man restored to the image of God and fitted to drink of the river of his pleas- 
ures." The superintendent of the Home where he died reports that "his last 
words were, ' I am going to be with my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ,' " 

He was married, October 6, 1831, to Maria Mabel Wilcox, of Le Roy, N.Y., 



7 6 

daughter of Nathan Wilcox and Elizabeth Elliot. She died at Rochester, 
X.Y., March 25, 1836. 

Mr. Kimball died of old age, at Perth Amboy, N.J., June 15, 1892, aged 
ninety-nine years, three months, and ten days. 

CLASS OP 1832. 

Albert William Fiske. 

Son of Dea. William Fisk and Lucy Bradish; born in Upton, Mass., 
January 16, 1802; prepared for college at Day's Academy, Wrentham ; grad- 
uated at Brown University, 1829, and took the full course in this Seminary. 
He began to preach in Alfred, Me., immediately after his graduation in Sep- 
tember, 1832 ; was ordained there as an evangelist, May 8, 1833, and continued 
as acting pastor of the church until 1844. From 1844 to 1848 he was in charge 
of the church at Scarboro, Me., and after brief periods of supply in Houlton, 
Me., 1848, and Upton, Mass., 1849, ne was installed at Kittery, Me., July 18, 1850, 
and remained there seven years. May 20, 1857, he was installed over the church 
at Fisherville (now Penacook) in Boscawen, N.H., and dismissed, September 16, 
1863. Although retiring then from active pastoral service and retaining his 
residence at Fisherville, he afterwards supplied for a few months each the 
churches in Centre Harbor, Boscawen, Warner, Barnstead, and Groton, clos- 
ing his last engagement in 1870. 

Prof. W. J. Tucker, D.D. (Class of 1866), writes of him : " Mr. Fiske was 
a pastor of unusual faithfulness and efficiency. He was direct, simple, and 
interesting in his thought in the pulpit and in his intercourse with his people. 
After his resignation he lived for a considerable term of years in the town — 
an admirable parishioner and a respected citizen." 

He was married, January 1, 1833, to Mary Davis, of Holden, Mass., daugh- 
ter of Elnathan Davis and Lucy Partridge. She died, January 2, 1850, and he 
married, second, June 18, 1851, Mary Ann Whipple, of Charlton, Mass., 
daughter of John Whipple and Anna Hall. She survives him, with two sons and 
two daughters, another son having died in 1876 and three children in infancy. 

Mr. Fiske died of old age, at Penacook, N.H., December 7, 1892, aged 
nearly ninety-one years. 

CLASS OF 1835. 

Isaac Redington Worcester, M.D. (Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Rev. Leonard Worcester and Elizabeth Hopkins ; born in Peacham, 
Vt., October 30, 1808; prepared for college at Peacham Academy, but was pre- 
vented by ill health from pursuing a classical education; graduated at Dart- 
mouth Medical College, 1832, having also studied under Dr. Josiah Shedd, of 
Peacham. He practiced medicine in Leicester, Mass. , for three years, and then 
turned his attention to the study of theology, and was licensed to preach by 
the Caledonia (Vt.) Association, August 8, 1835. His brother, Rev. Evarts 
Worcester, having died in the first year of his pastorate at Littleton, N.H., he 
succeeded him there, being ordained September 27, 1837, and remaining five 
years. From 1842 to 1846 he was secretary of the Vermont Domestic Mission- 
ary Society, having his residence at Montpelier. He then began his long period 



77 

of service for the American Board, being district secretary for Massachusetts 
until 1859, and editor of the Missionary Herald, and for much of the time of the 
Journal of Missions, from 1856 to 1878. He was also a corporate member of 
the Board from 1870 to 1889, and a member of the Prudential Committee from 
1878 to 1882. In 1849 ne removed from Leicester to Auburndale, being one 
of the first residents of that suburban village and one of the founders of its 
church. 

Mr. Worcester was of a marked ministerial stock, his father being of the 
famous Worcester family of Hollis, and his mother a daughter of Rev. Dr. 
Samuel Hopkins, of Hadley ; his maternal aunts were the wives of Dr. Emmons, 
Dr. Austin, and Dr. Spring ; three of his brothers were ministers — one of them, 
Dr. Samuel A. Worcester (Class of 1823), the early missionary to the Cherokees 
whose unjust imprisonment in the Georgia Penitentiary occasioned great indigna- 
tion in New England. Naturally, therefore, although trained for another pro- 
fession, he became a minister, and spent nearly all of his long life in quiet but 
most valuable service in the home department of foreign missions. " He was a 
man of sincere piety, humble yet cheerful, gladly spending his time and strength 
in labors for the coming of that kingdom which he joyfully believed would yet 
be established throughout the earth." 

He was married, November 16, 1835, to Mary Sophia Sargent, of Leicester, 
Mass., daughter of Col. Henry Sargent and Elizabeth Denny. She survives 
him, with two daughters, one the wife of Dr. N. G. Clark, foreign secretary 
of the American Board, the other of Prof. M. L. D'Ooge, of Michigan University. 
Two sons and one daughter died in childhood. 

Mr. Worcester died of old age, in Auburndale, Mass., October 23, 1892, 
lacking only one week of being eighty-four years old. 



CLASS OF 1836. 

Kendall Flint, M.D. (Non-graduate.) 

Son of Major Elijah Flint and Elizabeth Putnam ; bom in that part of Dan- 
vers now West Peabody, February 4, 1807 ; prepared for college at Hampton 
(N.H.) Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1831 ; studied in the Seminary 
during parts of three years, 1832-35, but was compelled by ill health to abandon 
his preparation for the ministry; studied medicine with Dr. Joseph Osgood, of 
South Danvers (now Peabody), and graduated at Harvard Medical College, 1839. 
He settled as a physician in Haverhill, Mass., in 1840, and retired from practice, 
a very active and successful one, in 1870, continuing his residence in that city. 

Dr. Flint was examining surgeon in the time of the War of the Rebellion, 
and has since held the same office in connection with pension claims. He was 
one of the original members and one of the first deacons of the North Church, 
as he had been previously a member and deacon of the Centre Church. Rev. 
Dr. J. D. Kingsbury, of Bradford (Class of 1856), writes : " Dr. Flint was a thor- 
oughly good man ; he was a thoughtful man, conservative but progressive ; he 
was a leading member of the Monday Evening Literary Club; he was always 
on the right side in public affairs ; he had the confidence of the people abso- 
lutely ; he lived a quiet life, did his work faithfully and earnestly, and has gone 
to his reward." 

He was married, June 28, 1842, to Mary Frances Carleton, of Haverhill, 



78 

daughter of Phineas Carleton and Frances Brickett. She survives him ; their 
two children died in early childhood. 

Dr. Flint died at Haverhill, Mass., September 29, 1892, of old age, in the 
eighty- sixth year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1838. 
Daniel Butler. 

Son of Capt. Henry Butler and Chloe Hinsdale; born in Hartford, Conn., 
June 23, 1808 ; fitted for college under tuition of Rev. Emerson Davis at West- 
field, Mass., which was then the home of the family ; graduated at Yale College, 
1835 ; spent three years in the Seminary ; was licensed to preach, April 10, 1838, 
by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Dr. Justin Edwards in Andover. 
The Sabbath after his graduation in September he preached as a candidate for 
settlement at the Village Church in Dorchester, Mass., and was ordained its 
pastor, October 31, 1838. He was dismissed from that charge in 1845, m order 
to enter upon an agency for the American Bible Society in Massachusetts. In 
1852 he became secretary of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and in its service 
spent the remainder of his long life. 

The year after leaving Dorchester he resided at Waltham, from 1847 to 1853 
at Westboro, from 1853 t0 l ^3 at Groton, afterwards at Waverly in the new town 
of Belmont. He was a useful member of the school committee there, and in 
1883 represented that district in the Legislature. But his great work, which for 
nearly forty years he performed with rare judgment and fidelity, was in behalf 
of the Holy Scriptures and the society which published and circulated them, 
and there was not a " conference " nor scarcely a town in the whole State where 
"Bible Butler," as he was familiarly and affectionately called, was not known 
and welcomed. Prof. Samuel Harris, D.D., his Seminary classmate, writes of 
him: "He had preeminent qualifications for this work and threw himself into 
it with all his heart. Few are remembered with so lively interest by so many 
people. He was a brilliant conversationist, always overflowing with wit and 
humor ; a man of genial and loving spirit, and of pure and earnest piety. His 
widespread influence lives after him, and many are they who lament his death 
as a personal bereavement." Rev. Aaron M. Colton, of Easthampton, Mass., 
a classmate both in college and seminary, adds : " Brother Butler was our class 
spokesman, everywhere and always ; no classmate was venturesome enough to 
take his place if he was present. No one was so to be depended on to be present 
at both the Yale and Andover meetings. . . . Though surcharged with wit and 
humor, he never used it to wound a sensitive spirit — his heart was tender as a 
woman's. Nor was a 'merry quip ' ever heard in one of his sermons. Brother 
Butler did not mistake his mission. Not one man in a million could so well^tf 
forth to sow, or could so well touch men's lives with a kindly light." 

Mr. Butler was married, November 8, 1838, to Jane Douglas, of Trenton, 
N.Y., daughter of James Douglas and Catherine Billings, who died January 16, 
1892. Two daughters died in infancy, and a son in 1892. One son and one 
daughter survive. 

He died of catarrh of the bowels, at Waverly, Mass., February 4, 1893, in 
the eighty- fifth year of his age. 



79 

Charles Dame. 

Son of Joseph Dame and Anna Plummer; born in Berwick (now South 
Berwick), Me., September 12, 1810; prepared for college at Berwick Academy; 
graduated at Bowdoin College, 1835 ; took the full course in the Seminary ; 
was licensed to preach, April 10, 1838, by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover. The next day after the Commencement at 
Andover, he went to Falmouth, Me., to preach as a candidate, and remained 
fifteen years as the pastor of the First Church there, being ordained May 29, 
1839, and dismissed August II, 1853. He was pastor at Brentwood, N.H., 
from 1854 to 1856, removing then to Exeter, N.H., where he resided for sixteen 
years, without regular charge, but occasionally preaching and acting as agent 
for a Boston publishing house in the introduction of a series of school books- 
From 1872 to 1876 he was in Iowa, two years at Quasqueton, and two years at 
Centre Point, organizing a church and securing the erection of a house of wor- 
ship at the latter place. Returning to the East, he preached at West Newbury, 
Mass. (First Church), 1877-S1 ; at Andover, Me., 1881-85; at West Newfield, 
Me., 1885-86; at Eastport, Me., 1886-87, and at Phippsburg, Me., 1887-89. His 
home was afterwards at Falmouth. An old friend in Maine characterizes him as 
"diligent in all his undertakings, of more than ordinary ability as a preacher, 
and a loving pastor, genial both in spirit and manner." 

He was married, January 28, 1840, to Nancy Jenness Page, of Acton, Me., 
daughter of Samuel Perkins Page and Theodate Drake. She survives him, with 
one son, a graduate of Bowdoin College, and three daughters, graduates of Mt. 
Holyoke Female Seminary. Two children died in infancy. 

Mr. Dame died at Falmouth, Me., of cerebral hemorrhage, June 26, 1892, 
in the eighty-second year of his age. 



Stephen Sewall Norton Greeley. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Stephen Leavitt Greeley, Esq., and Anna Norton ; born in Gilman- 
ton, N.H., January 23, 1813; prepared for college at Gilmanton Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1835; studied in this Seminary, 1835-36, and 
in Gilmanton Theological Seminary, 1836-38, teaching at the same time in Gil- 
manton Academy. He was ordained over the church at Gilmanton Iron Works, 
N.H., January 31, 1839, and remained there until 1842. His subsequent pastor- 
ates were successively in New Market, N.H., 1842-47; Chicopee Falls, Mass., 
1847-51; Great Barrington, Mass., 1852-56; Grand Rapids, Mich., 1857-62; 
Oswego, N.Y., 1866-73. His health being much impaired, he then returned to 
New Hampshire, preaching five years for the church in Pittsfield, although 
residing in Gilmanton. The Gilmanton pulpit being vacant, after the long pas- 
torate of Dr. Joseph Blake, he supplied it from 1879 to 1886. Although retiring 
then from permanent pastoral engagements, he preached for several summers 
afterward at the Hillville Church in Canterbury, and often at other places. He 
preached in the Gilmanton church a few days before his sudden death. 

Mr. Greeley published several sermons and contributed much to the local 
press, both in poetry and prose, the latter being mainly articles of historical 
interest. He represented his native town in the New Hampshire Legislature, 
1879-80. Residing in Michigan at the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion, he 



8o 

became chaplain of the 6th Cavalry of that State, and for three years did labori- 
ous and faithful service. The writer well remembers his sun-browned, war-worn 
appearance when met with " Sheridan's Cavalry " in the woods of Virginia, where 
they were encamped for a day just before going into the final battles which re- 
sulted in the capture of Richmond. Of unique and magnetic personality, of 
marked gifts as a speaker and writer, of genial humor, sincere sympathy, and 
catholic spirit, Mr. Greeley was everywhere a successful minister and a beloved 
pastor. 

Mr. Greeley was married, September 29, 1840, to Sarah Barker Curtis, of 
Pittsfield, N.H., daughter of Rev. Jonathan Curtis and Betsey Barker. She 
survives him, with a son (Rev. Frank Norton Greeley) and a daughter. 

Mr. Greeley died of heart failure, at Gilmanton, N.H., October 25, 1892, 
in the eightieth year of his age. 

Eliezer Jewett Marsh. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Dea. James Marsh and Miriam Walbridge ; born in Cabot, Vt, 
March 21, 1811; prepared for college at Randolph (Vt.) Academy; graduated 
at Middlebury College, 1833 ; was principal of Jericho (Vt.) Academy, 1833-35 ; 
began theological study in this Seminary, 1835-36, but was compelled by sick- 
ness to abandon it. He was principal of the Concord (Mass.) High School, 
1836-37; of Thetford (Vt.) Academy, 1837-40; of Milton (Mass.) Academy, 
1840-45; teacher in Dorchester, Mass., 1845-47; and in Lawrence Academy, 
Groton, Mass., 1847-55. He resided afterwards in Leominster, Mass., being 
for some years the general agent for the Student and Schoolmate for New Eng- 
land. He spent nearly twenty years in the preparation of a Genealogy of the 
Descendants of George Marsh, which he published in 1887. Mr. Marsh had 
a long and successful career as a teacher, training more than four hundred 
pupils and fitting a hundred for college. During his residence of nearly forty 
years in Leominster he was an honored citizen and an active member of the 
Congregational church. 

He was married, August 28, 1838, to Martha Baker, of Lincoln, Mass., 
daughter of Jacob Baker and Lavinia Minot. She survives him, with two 
sons and two daughters, four children having died in childhood. One son is 
Rev. Francis J. Marsh, Class of 1875, now connected with the Congregational 
Publishing Society. 

Mr. Marsh died of neuralgia of the heart, at Leominster, Mass., March 14, 
1893, lacking one week of being eighty- two years old. 



CLASS OP 1841. 

Henry Laurens Hammond. 

Son of Chester Hammond and Fanny Goodrich ; born in Smyrna, N.Y., 
February 14, 181 5; prepared for college at the Oneida Institute, Whitesboro, 
N.Y.j graduated at Oberlin College, 1838; in Union Theological Seminary, 
1839-40; in this Seminary, 1840-41 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 1841. He 
was ordained at Kingston, Mass., December 8, 1841, and was acting pastor of 
the church there for one year, and of the Presbyterian Church in Homer, Mich., 



8l 

for two years. From 1844 to 1847 he was pastor of the First Congregational 
Church in Detroit, Mich, (which he had organized) ; preached at Morrisville, 
N.Y., from 1848 to 1850, and at Grand Rapids, Mich., from 1851 to 1S56. He 
then removed to Chicago, 111., and edited the Congregational Herald fr om 1857 
to 1861 ; supplied the church in Princeton, 111., 1861-62; and held the position 
of treasurer of Chicago Theological Seminary for ten years. After resigning that 
office in 1872 he was in business in Chicago, removing in 1889 to Evanston, 111. 

Mr. Hammond wrote largely for the religious press, especially for the Con- 
gregational ist, and was for a time editor of the National Sunday-School Teacher. 
He published New Stories from an Old Book (a series of Biblical narratives), a 
Memoir of Philo Carpenter, and several other books mostly of a controversial 
character. He was an early and steadfast opponent of slavery, and in that, as 
in other matters affecting truth and duty, held his convictions firmly and main- 
tained them fearlessly. Rev. S. J. Humphrey, D.D., of Chicago (Class of 1852), 
writes of him : " Mr. Hammond was a born reformer. He wielded an incisive 
pen, and was among the foremost of those who, in advance of the age, foresaw 
and pushed to the front movements which are now accepted as wise and just. 
He may with propriety be called one of the fathers of the new Congregational- 
ism of the West." 

He was married, September 24, 1843, to Mary Jane Mead, of Smyrna, X.V., 
who died June 23, 1849; second, December 2, 1850, to Eunice Johnson Brigham, 
of Binghamton, N.Y., who died January 28, 1858; third, September 20, 1859, 
to Frances Elizabeth Jennings, of Brookfield, Mass., daughter of Dea. Calvin 
Jennings and Laura Hastings, who died March 22, 1863; and fourth, April 18, 
1865, to Mrs. Elizabeth L. Wiswall, daughter of Rev. Daniel Lovejoy and Eliza- 
beth Pattee (and sister of Elijah P. Lovejoy, the antislavery martyr), and widow 
of Noah Wiswall. She survives him. He left two sons, one an instructor in 
the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Jacksonville, 111., the other a banker 
in Chicago, and a married daughter in Portland, Ore. 

He died of heart failure, at Evanston, 111., March 3, 1893, a g e ^ seventy- 
eight years. 

GLASS OF 1842. 

Edwin Elisha Bliss, D.D. 

Son of Harvey Bliss and Abigail Grout; bom in Putney, Vt., April 12, 181 7 ; 
prepared for college at Springfield (Mass.) High School ; graduated at Amherst 
College, 1837 ; was assistant teacher in Amherst Academy one year ; took the 
full course in the Seminary, 1839-42 ; was licensed to preach by the Andover 
Association, meeting with Rev. Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 12, 1842. 
He was ordained at West Springfield, Mass., February 9, 1843, as a missionary 
of the American Board, and sailed from Boston for Smyrna, March 1, expecting 
to join the Nestorian Mission in Persia. Providentially hindered from reaching 
that field, he spent his life in Turkey — until 1852 at Trebizond, until 1856 at 
Marsovan, and thirty-six years afterward at Constantinople. These years were 
largely employed in literary work, especially in the editorship of The Messenger 
(the Avedaper) in the Armenian and Turkish languages, and in the translation of 
many English books into the Armenian. Amherst College conferred upon him 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1869. Rev. Dr. Isaac G. Bliss, of the Class 
of 1847, so long a missionary in the same field, was his brother. 



82 

Dr. Bliss won in a remarkable degree the affection and confidence of every 
one with whom he had to do from his youth to the close of his life. Hon. Lucius 
M. Boltwood (Class of 1847), who was under his instruction at Amherst, writes : 
" He was greatly respected and beloved by his academy pupils." Rev. Dr. 
Samuel C. Bartlett, his classmate at Andover, says of him: "In the Seminary 
he was a clear-headed, judicious, faithful, spiritual man, an industrious student, 
a genial companion, a true friend, a modest, quiet, and effective religious force." 
Rev. Dr. N. G. Clark (Class of 1852), foreign secretary of the American Board, 
writes of him : "A man of broad views and generous sympathies ; a wise 
and safe counselor ; a friend always kind, genial, and true ; a Christian ever 
loyal to the Master and untiring in devotion to every good work. His very 
presence at a mission station was a power and a blessing to his associates." 

He was married, February 20, 1843, t0 Isabella Homes Porter, of Portland, 
Me., daughter of Richard King Porter and Mary Clapp. She survives him, with 
three children : Rev. W. D. P. Bliss, rector of the " Church of the Carpenter," 
in Boston ; the wife of Langdon S. Ward, treasurer of the American Board ; and 
the wife of Rev. Henry O. D wight, missionary in Constantinople. Their oldest 
daughter, the previous wife of Mr. Dwight, died at Constantinople in 1872. 

Dr. Bliss died in Constantinople, December 20, 1892, of paralysis, aged 
seventy- five years. 

Alfred Stevens, D.D. 

Son of Nehemiah Stevens and Deborah Goodell; born in Waterford, Vt., 
July 31, 1810; prepared for college at Peacham (Vt.) and Kimball Union Acad- 
emies; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1839; took the full course in the Sem- 
inary, and was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Rev. Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 12, 1842. He went directly from the 
Seminary to the supply of the West Church in Westminster, Vt., over whidh 
he was ordained, February 22, 1843, an< ^ m whose service he continued until 
the time of his death, fifty years afterward, although as pastor emeritus from 
1887, when Rev. Henry A. Goodhue (Class of 1862) became his colleague. 

Mr. Stevens was for twenty- five years the superintendent of schools in 
Westminster, and represented the town in the State Legislature in 1872. He 
was a member of the Vermont Historical Society, and Dartmouth College con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1874. His only publications 
were a funeral sermon in memory of a Westminster soldier, in 1863 ; a historical 
address on the fortieth anniversary of his settlement, in 1883 ; and a history of his 
parish contributed to Miss Hemenway's Vermont Historical Gazetteer. But 
the fifty years of his service at Westminster were full of scholarly, faithful, suc- 
cessful work for his church and town, and through association, conference, 
and convention for the broader public interests of education and religion in the 
State. 

Rev. Moses H. Wells (Class of 1845), who was his college classmate, 
writes: "Dr. Stevens had and used effectively the power of staying. He 
possessed the health of body and mind, the practical common sense, the faith 
and love, which empowered him to stay and do his life work for a single country 
parish. He desired no other. He only wished to live for and die with his peo- 
ple. He was always an independent thinker, and drew his theology mainly from 
the fountain of divine revelation in God's Word and in his own personal experi- 



83 

ence. He proclaimed fearlessly the truth as he understood it, always cherishing 
a generous feeling towards brethren having different views. Dr. Stevens was a 
manly man, a true man among men, moved by a deep sympathy for his fellow 
travelers on earth's pilgrimage and seeking to do good to every one as he had 
opportunity." 

He was married, August II, 1844, to Eliza Wright Farrar, of Troy, N.H., 
daughter of Col. Daniel Warren Farrar and Betsey Griffin. She died Decem- 
ber 8, 1844, and he married, second, June 23, 1S46, Mary Ann Arnold, of 
Westminster, daughter of Rev. Seth Shaler Arnold and Fanny House. She 
died March 1, 1857, and he married, third, August 25, 1S58, Harriet Newell 
Wood, of Millbury, Mass., daughter of Capt. Amasa Wood and Sarah For- 
estall. She died May 30, 1874, and he married, fourth, May 28, 1876, Mrs. 
Catherine Miller Slate, of Brattleboro, Vt., daughter of Asa Miller and Sally 
Bemis, and widow of Orrin Slate. She died June 30, 1S92. Dr. Stevens had 
no children. 

He died at Westminster West, Vt., of heart failure, January 20, 1S93, m 
the eighty-third year of his age. 

Eliphalet Young Swift. 

Son of Charles Swift and Eunice Young; born in Fairfax, Vt, January 16, 
1815; fitted for college with Rev. Worthington Smith (Class of 1819), St. Al- 
bans, Vt. ; graduated at Middlebury College, 1839; took the full course in the 
Seminary; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Rev. Justin Edwards, D.D., Andover, April 12, 1S42. The first year after grad- 
uation he was a general agent of the American Tract Society in Ohio, Indiana, 
and Kentucky; and was ordained at Chilicothe, Ohio, January 10, 1844, as pastor 
of the Independent Presbyterian Church there. In 1845 ne became pastor of 
the First Church, Northampton, Mass., and remained there six years, filling sub- 
sequent pastorates in South Hadley, Mass., 1851-57; Clinton, N.Y., 1858-62; 
Williamsburg, Mass., 1862-68; and Denmark, Io., 1868-82. He continued to 
reside afterward at Denmark, and was acting pastor of the church, 1884-85. 

Mr. Swift was for thirty-seven years a trustee of Mt. Holyoke Female 
Seminary, and after he removed to Iowa a trustee of Denmark Academy. Rev. 
Edward P. Blodgett, of Greenwich, Mass., a Seminary classmate, writes : " E. Y. 
Swift was a servant of God of rare excellence, possessed of a sweet Christian 
spirit, and a charming man in every way ; of more than average ability and a 
faithful minister of Jesus Christ. His rich voice heard in the songs of the 
sanctuary still lingers, and his memory will continue to be fresh and fragrant." 

He was married, December 7, 1843, to Catharine Spooner Leach, of Pitts- 
ford, Vt., daughter of Andrew Leach and Deborah Spooner. She survives her 
husband, together with three of their five children. 

Mr. Swift died at Denmark, Io., June 15, 1892, of enlargement of the pros- 
tate gland, at the age of seventy-seven years. 



8 4 

Hiram Bingham. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Jeremiah Bingham and Rhoda Fenn ; born in Cornwall, Vt., May 30, 
1815; prepared for college at Addison County (Vt.) Grammar School; grad- 
uated at Middlebury College, 1839 ; in this Seminary, 1839-41 ; graduated at 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1842. He was ordained by the Ripley Presbytery, 
Ohio, in June, 1843, anc * was for two years pastor at Red Oak, Ohio, and for the 
succeeding two years at Portsmouth, Ohio. From 1846 to 1849 he was professor 
of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology in Marietta College. After a brief supply 
at Watertown, Ohio, in 1850, he was installed as pastor of the Presbyterian Church, 
at Windham, Ohio, and remained such until 1855. With the exception of one 
winter, 1855-56, which, for the benefit of his health, he spent in Augusta, Ga., 
where he supplied the First Presbyterian Church, he continued to reside in 
Windham. Though often supplying vacant and feeble churches in the vicinity, 
he spent most of his later years in labors upon his farm, improving his health 
and securing considerable property, the most of which he left to the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions. 

Mr. Bingham was married, September 22, 1842, to Abigail Bushnell, of 
Cornwall, Vt., daughter of Rev. Jedidiah Bushnell and Elizabeth Smith. She 
died August 23, 1886. They had no children. 

He died at Windham, Ohio, November 11, 1892, of chronic bronchitis, aged 
seventy-seven years. 



Justin Field. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Justin Field and Harriet Power ; born in Northfield, Mass., April 10, 
1816; prepared for college at Northfield Academy; graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1835; studied in Union Seminary, 1838-39, and in this Seminary, 1840-41. 
He was ordained as deacon, January 6, 1842, and as priest (both by Bishop 
Griswold), September 7, 1842. He was rector of St. Paul's Church, Stock- 
bridge, Mass., 1846-50; of St. James' Church, Great Barrington, Mass., 1850-52; 
of Grace Church, Medford, Mass., 1852-62; and of Trinity Church, Lenox, 
Mass., 1862-90. He afterwards spent considerable time in travel in Europe and 
in the Southern States. While sojourning during the winter of 1892 in the 
South, especially at Brooksville, Fla., he preached for several weeks ; a friend 
writes that "his labors there were greatly blessed — the crown of his earthly 
ministry." 

" Mr. Field was a man of far more intellectual power than even his acquaint- 
ances knew, but he always shrank from publicity, and seemed to have no desire 
for fame, as the world considers fame ; but he always did his day's work with 
a mind to see the intense interest of this life, and a heart to feel the joys and 
sorrows of others." 

He was married, June 26, 1862, to Caroline Cushing Wilde, of Boston, 
daughter of George C. Wilde, Esq. (Clerk of the Supreme Judicial Court), 
and Ann Jeanette (Brown) Druce. She died March 23, 1888, leaving two 
daughters. He married, second, April 26, 1890, Louise Hope Irene, young- 
est daughter of Hon. W. H. and Lady Hylton-Joliffe, of London, England, who 
survives him. 

Mr. Field died of cystitis, at West Newton, Mass., March 5, 1893, in his 
seventy-seventh year. 



85 

CLASS OF 1846. 
James Fletcher. 

Son of Dea. John Fletcher and Clarissa Jones ; born in Acton, Mass., Sep- 
tember 5, 1823 ; prepared for college at Leicester Academy and New Ipswich 
(N.H.) Academy; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1843; took the full course 
in this Seminary, 1843-46; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 7, 1S46; preached at 
Kingston, N.H., from November, 1846, to February, 1848; in the Seminary as 
resident licentiate, 1S4S-49. He was ordained as pastor of the Maple Street 
Church, Danvers, Mass., June 20, 1849, continuing in that service until 1S64. 
He then was principal of the Holten High School in the same town until 1S70 ; 
of the Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass., 1S71-77; of the Burr and Burton 
Seminary, Manchester, Vt., 1878-81 ; afterwards residing at Acton. In 1883-84 
he taught the High School at Littleton, Mass. 

He was identified with the interests of education nearly all his life, having 
been a member of the school committee fifteen years when in Danvers, superin- 
tendent of schools for five years during his later residence in Acton, and chair- 
man of the school board at the time of his death. He was a trustee of Acton 
Memorial Library, and in 1890 published a monograph, entitled Acton in History. 
In a published political address upon the public schools, delivered in Danvers in 
1891, an early pupil, himself an Irish Roman Catholic, paid this tribute to Mr. 
Fletcher as a Protestant minister : " With all that is beautiful and touching in 
the memories of my youth his name is linked. No man ever instilled or sought 
to instill into my mind worthier purposes of life, higher ambitions, or purer 
motives than Rev. James Fletcher." Rev. Daniel L. Furber, D.D., a class- 
mate both at Dartmouth and Andover, writes : " Mr. Fletcher's modesty, native 
refinement, and scholarship made him a favorite with his teachers, and with the 
best men in his class both in college and in the Seminary. In the Seminary he 
was president of the Society of Inquiry, and as such he delivered a special ora- 
tion when he graduated. He was an enthusiastic friend of education. Whether 
as minister, teacher, or school committee, his presence in the schoolroom was an 
inspiration to both teacher and pupil. His cheerful and courageous spirit was 
always ready for any task to which he was called. His character was one of rare 
sweetness and beauty." 

He was married, October 10, 1849, t0 Lydia Middleton Woodward, of An- 
dover, daughter of Rev. Henry Woodward and Lydia Middleton (who both died 
in the missionary service in Ceylon) and adopted daughter of Samuel Fletcher, 
Esq., of Andover, then treasurer of the Seminary. She died August 26, 1877 ; 
two sons died in early childhood, and one daughter resides in Acton. 

Mr. Fletcher died at Acton, Mass., March 28, 1893, °* heart disease, in the 
seventieth year of his age. 

CLASS OP 1848. 

Joseph Thomas Noyes. 

Son of Joseph Noyes and Miriam Cheever; born in Newburyport, March 4, 
1818; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at Am- 
herst College, 1845; took tn e full course in this Seminary; was licensed to 
preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, An- 
dover, April 11, 1848. Having been appointed as missionary by the American 
Board he was ordained in the Old South Church at Newburyport, September 20. < 



86 

1848, and sailed for Ceylon from Boston the next month. He labored in the 
Jaffna Mission until 1853, when he was transferred to the Madura Mission of 
Southern India, in which he remained until his death. 

Rev. Geo. H. Gutterson (Class of 1878), who was for several years a fellow 
worker with Mr. Noyes in India, writes of him in the Missionary Herald : " Mr. 
Noyes spent the greater part of his mission life in one of the largest stations of 
the Madura Mission, and the name Periakulam became almost synonymous with 
his. He was a guide and leader of his people in spiritual and in temporal things. 
... In the beautiful valley lying along the base of the Western Ghauts in South- 
ern India for forty years save one he found his work. . . . When he entered 
that valley there were but few Christians, scarcely a schoolhouse or a church ; 
when he left it there were forty-seven Christian congregations numbering 2,787 
members, and six organized churches with 703 communicants ; there were school- 
houses and churches, family altars and noble Christian lives, the promise and 
hope of a transformed civilization — the beginning of the kingdom." 

Mr. Noyes was married, September 12, 1848, to Elizabeth Achsah Smith, of 
Amherst, Mass., daughter of Rufus Smith and Betsey Browning. She died in 
India, April 10, 1880. He married, second, May 30, 1881, in Rome, Martha J. 
Mandeville, of Claverack, N.Y., who had been for twelve years a missionary of 
the Dutch Reformed Mission at Arcot in Southern India. She remains still in 
the service in India. Of three sons and three daughters, one son is a successful 
and benevolent merchant in Cincinnati; Charles L. Noyes (Class of 1880) is pas- 
tor of the Winter Hill Congregational Church, Somerville, Mass. ; William H. 
Noyes (Class of 1887) is a missionary of the Berkeley Temple Church, Boston, 
in Japan; while the daughters are in India — the two older in missionary service. 

Mr. Noyes died at Madras, Southern India, August 9, 1892, of heart disease, 
in his seventy- fifth year. 

Hezekiah Danford Perry. 

Son of Hezekiah Perry and Keziah Bliss ; born in Rehoboth, Mass., March 21, 
1818 ; prepared for college at Monson Academy ; graduated at Amherst College, 
1845 '■> m tne Seminary, 1845-48, and as resident licentiate the following year. 
He was licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jack- 
son, Andover, April 11, 1848, but was never ordained. He had a special inter- 
est in and fitness for the work of reformatory institutions, and spent several years 
in it, first as teacher and assistant superintendent at the House of Refuge in 
Philadelphia, afterwards as teacher and superintendent of a similar institution 
at Cincinnati, and still later as Western agent of the New York Juvenile Asylum. 
He taught also for some years both in Indiana and in Massachusetts. In 1865 
a partial paralysis of the optic nerve compelled him to abandon teaching, and 
he carried on a farm at " Hillview "in Conway, Mass., where Mrs. Perry, a for- 
mer teacher in Mt. Holyoke Seminary, had a private school for young ladies. 

He was married, February 25, 1852, to Elizabeth Sherwood Howland, of 
Worcester, Mass., daughter of Southworth Howland and Polly Ware. She died 
September 15, 1855, and he married, second, June 1, 1871, Mary Elizabeth Childs, 
of Conway, Mass., daughter of Horace Bliss Childs and Mary Clark Jenney, who 
survives him. Of two daughters, one died in infancy and the other is the wife 
of Henry Martyn Howland, of the Class of 1887. 

Mr. Perry died at Conway, Mass., September 25, 1892, of paralysis, in the 
seventy- fifth year of his age. 



S7 
GLASS OF 1849. 

Henry Martyn Goodwin, D.D. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Caleb Goodwin and Harriet Williams; born in Hartford, Conn., 
June 8, 1820; prepared for college at the Hopkins Grammar School, Hartford; 
graduated at Yale College, 1840; studied in Union Seminary, 1843-45; grad- 
uated from Yale Divinity School in 1846 ; and was a resident licentiate in this 
Seminary, 1848-49, spending much of the intervening time at his home in Hart- 
ford, although teaching for a time near Richmond, Va. He was licensed to 
preach by the Hartford Central Association, November 4, 1S45. He was 
ordained at Rockford, 111., February 19, 185 1, and continued the pastor of the 
First Church there for twenty -one years ; resigning that charge in 1872, he spent 
two years in foreign travel, and from 1875 to ! ^7 was professor of English 
Literature, Rhetoric, and Logic in Olivet College, Michigan, and one of the pas- 
tors of the college church. In 1892 he removed from Olivet to Williamstown, 
Mass., and made his home with his daughter. 

For many years he was a trustee of Rockford Female Seminary, and very 
influential as such. Olivet College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity in 1876. He contributed many valuable essays to the Reviews, and 
published, in 1875, Christ and Humanity. Prof. N. H. Egleston, his school- 
mate at Hartford and classmate at Yale, writes of him : " He became a 
great admirer and disciple of Dr. Bushnell, espoused his views completely 
and zealously, and published not a few articles in exposition, advocacy, or de- 
fense of them in prose and verse. . . . His letters to me from Williamstown 
expressed his satisfaction as they told of new subjects under investigation, and 
new sermons and essays in contemplation. He had one or two volumes of ser- 
mons in preparation for publication, a portion of which, at least, I hope, may 
yet see the light in connection with some appropriate memoir of him." Prof. 
J. M. Iloppin, D.D., of Yale University (Class of 1845), h^ college classmate, 
writes : " Dr. Goodwin was a man of uncommon sweetness, purity, and elevation 
of character. He was a philosophical thinker, and in his book on the Hu- 
manity of Christ he left his mark on theological science. I have rarely known 
so unworldly a man who dwelt in the realm of pure and high thinking." 

He was married, November 6, 1854, to Martha French, of Bath, N.H., 
daughter of Dr. John French and Mary Gale. She died March 17, 1876. They 
had two sons and two daughters. One of the sons is a business man in Chi- 
cago, the other a Congregational minister at Lombard, 111. ; one of the daugh- 
ters is a teacher, the other the wife of Prof. Henry D. Wild, of Williams 
College. 

Dr. Goodwin died at Williamstown, Mass., of pneumonia, March 1, 1893, 
in the seventy- third year of his age. 

GLASS OP 1852. 

Obed Dickinson. 

Son of Obed Dickinson and Experience Smith; born in Amherst, Mass., 
June 15, 1818; prepared for college at Ontario (Ind.) Academy; graduated at 
Marietta College, 1849; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Rev. William T. Briggs in the North Parish of Andover, April 13, 
1852. He was ordained in the West Parish Church of Andover, Septem- 



88 

ber 2, 1852, as a home missionary, and sailed from New York in the November 
following, going around Cape Horn and arriving at Portland, Ore., in March, 
1853. He at once took charge of the church in Salem, Ore., which had been 
formed the year before, and was its pastor until 1867. Leaving the ministry 
then on account of inadequate health, he carried on a prosperous seed business 
in that city until the time of his death. 

Mr. Dickinson gave faithful service for many years to the public schools of 
Salem, and was for a long time a trustee of Willamette University at Salem and 
of Pacific University at Forest Grove. " During his forty years in Salem his 
life has been an open book, and no man has done more by precept and example 
to create and promote the best influences in our civilization than he." Several 
years ago his convictions led him to associate himself with the Seventh Day 
Adventists, but he still retained the confidence and friendship of his early 
parishioners. 

He was married, September 22, 1852, to Charlotte Dryer Humphrey, of 
Gilead, Mich., daughter of Luman Humphrey and Philena Dryer. She survives 
him, with one daughter and an adopted daughter, two other children having died 
in childhood. 

He died at Salem, Ore., of heart disease, November 27, 1892, in his seventy- 
fifth year. 

CLASS OP 1856. 

Horatio Nelson Burton, D.D. 

Son of Stephen Burton and Judith Noyes Peaslee ; born in Washington, Vt., 
December 17, 1826; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy ; grad- 
uated at Dartmouth College, 1853; studied in the Theological Institute of Con- 
necticut at East Windsor, 1853-55; graduated at this Seminary, 1856; licensed 
to preach by Salem Association, at Dr. Parsons Cooke's, Lynn, February 11, 
1856. He was ordained pastor in Newbury, Vt., December 31, 1857, and re- 
mained there twelve years ; he was acting pastor in Sandusky, Ohio, 1869-76 ; of 
the Plymouth Church, Kalamazoo, Mich., 1876-79; at Sycamore, 111., 1880-83; 
and at Union City, Mich., 1885-87. While residing at East Burke, Vt., from 
1888 to 1890, he supplied the neighboring churches in Lyndon and Kirby, after- 
wards making his home with his sons at Minneapolis, Minn. 

Dartmouth College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
in 1875. R ev - S. L. B. Speare (Class of 1857) writes of him : "Dr. Burton was 
always zealous for the glory of God among men after the manner of the older 
divines. His preaching had the plainness of truth, and both convinced the judg- 
ment and won the affections. He was not much concerned about expedients ; 
his labors were inspired by deep and abiding principles. He could go in mid- 
summer among the neighbors of his boyhood home in Vermont with the gospel 
message so earnest and persuasive as to win many to Christ who had for years 
neglected all means of grace. He laid deep foundations wherever he built, in 
the East or West, reproducing his own character and consecration in others. 
In the last days, when work was no longer possible, he found rest in God's sover- 
eignty which he had always magnified." 

He was married, May 18, 1858, to Amelia Newell, of East Burke, Vt., 
daughter of Charles C. Newell and Florilla White. She survives him, with two 
sons and a daughter. 

He died at Minneapolis, Minn., of softening of the brain, March 5, 1893, 
aged sixty- six years. 



8 9 

Joseph How Tyler. (Won -graduate.) 

Son of John Tyler and Jemima Merrill How; born in Pelham, N.H., Feb- 
ruary n, 1825; graduated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1847, and at Dartmouth 
College, 1851 ; in this Seminary, 1853-54; having already studied law with 
Hon. Josiah G. Abbott, of Lowell, commenced practice of law at once, first at 
Lowell, then at East Cambridge. In 1858 he was elected Register of Probate 
and Insolvency for Middlesex County, and by successive reelections held that 
office until his death. He had also been a Master in Chancery for that county 
from 1855. He removed his residence in 1870 to Winchester. 

Mr. Tyler was called to various offices of trust both in Cambridge and in 
Winchester, having been in the former city member of the common council, of 
the board of aldermen, and of the school board, also bank director, savings bank 
trustee, and president of the Cambridge Railroad Company; in Winchester he 
was member of the school board, trustee of the public library, and president 
of the Winchester Historical Society. Rev. D. A. Newton (Class of 1S82), 
his pastor at Winchester, thus writes of him : "Joseph H. Tyler was a man of 
more than ordinary strength of mind and character, a natural leader, with posi- 
tive opinions and convictions and a manly courage for their expression, a con- 
stant reader of the best literature, a respected and honored citizen. He always 
gave the church of which he was a member the benefit of his wise and thought- 
ful counsel, and was a lover of God's people. He was active in Christian work, 
a teacher in the Sabbath school till the time of his death and at one time its 
superintendent for a term of years, and helpful in all the various benevolences 
for the spread of the gospel. He was one of that sturdy generation whose pass- 
ing away makes the world poorer." 

He was married, November 4, 1858, to Abby Little Hitchcock, of Win- 
chester, daughter of Charles Hitchcock and Abby Little Hall. She survives 
him, with a son, a graduate of Harvard College and a counselor at law in 
Boston, and a daughter, a graduate of Harvard Annex. 

Mr. Tyler died of cerebral hemorrhage, at Winchester, Mass., July II, 1892, 
aged sixty- seven years. 

GLASS OF 1860. 

Henry Chapman Hitchcock. 

Son of Joseph Hitchcock and Eliza Wright ; born in Fredericktown, Ohio, 
July 9, 1835 ; obtained his preparatory education at Central College, near Co- 
lumbus, Ohio; graduated at Oberlin College, 1856; took his theological course 
at Oberlin, 1856-59, and a supplementary year in this Seminary, 1859-60. He 
was ordained at North Amherst, Ohio, December 12, i860, and was pastor of 
the churches at North Amherst and South Amherst for nine years. He 
was pastor in Kenosha, Wis., 1869-77 ; and of the Hanover Street Church, Mil- 
waukee, Wis., 1877-78; coming East then in impaired health, he supplied the 
church inThomaston, Ct, 1879-80, and the Middle Reformed Church, Brook- 
lyn, N.Y., 1880-81. From December, 1882, to December, 1892, he was pastor of 
the Day Street Church in Somerville, Mass., preaching his closing sermon on 
Christmas Day. 

Mr. Hitchcock was from his youth enthusiastically interested in political 
and moral reforms. While still a college student he was one of the Ohio dele- 



90 

gates M national Republican Convention in Philadelphia; in war time 

was an outspoken advocate of the Union cause, spending a part of one summer 
in th ,. the (Jnited States Christian Commission among the soldiers at 

the front ; still later he was an earnest worker in the interests of temperance. 
Winship, of Somerrffle (Class of 1875). says of him : " Mr. Hitchcock 
was not only a clear and forcible preacher, but an exceptionally useful citizen 
and a conscientious champion of municipal reform, heroic and persistent in ac- 
complishing whatever the churches attempted by their united action." Rev. Dr. 

Dder M cKenzie, of Cambridge (Class of 1S61), writes: " He was a careful 

nt, with an active and independent mind. He sought by quiet and steady 

me th met his hearers. He made the children his especial care, and 

Mfa] in training them for the church. When he closed his pastorate 

nerville he seemed in the fullness of his strength. Too early, as it appears 
to those who knew the value of his life, has he rested from his toils. But in 
some grand employment he will use all which here he made his own." 

Mr. Hitchcock was married, June 26, 1862, to Mary Laurette Harris, of 

1 Amherst, Ohio, daughter of Hon. Josiah Harris and Anna Groves Moore. 

unives him, with one son and two daughters, two other children having 
died in early childhood. 

He died at Somerville, Mass., of carditis, May 5, 1893, in his fifty-eighth 
year. 

Abel Hastings Ross, D.D. 

Son of Phineas Ross and Betsey Marshall; born in Winchendon, Mass., 
April prepared for college at Winchendon Academy; graduated at 

Oberlin College, 1857 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1857-60. He was 
ordained as pastor of the church in Boylston, Mass., October 17, 1861, and re- 
mained there until 1S66; he was pastor of the First Church in Springfield, Ohio, 
1866-73 1 °f lne High Street (now Plymouth) Church in Columbus, Ohio, 1873-75 ; 
and of the church at Port Huron, Mich., from 1876 to the time of his death. 

( Mivet College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1884. 
He was lecturer on Church Polity at Oberlin Theological Seminary for twenty 
years from 1871, and Southworth lecturer on Congregationalism in this Semi- 
nary, 1882-86. The lectures under the latter appointment were published under 
the title of The Church- Kingdom ; he also published The Church of God (a cat- 
echism). The Ohio Manual, a Tocket Manual of Congregationalism, Immanuel 

: : ism for Infant Classes, and a volume of Sermons for Children, besides 
many papers concerning denominational polity. He was an active member of 
the International Congregational Council at London, which he had distinctly 
forecast in his plea for "An Ecumenical Council" in the Congregational Quar- 
terly in 1874. 

W. H. Ryder, D.D. (Class of 1869), writes: "Dr. Ross was a man of 

rkablv clear and incisive mind, and of unusual logical and comprehensive 

power. Early in his ministry he was impressed with the conviction that the 

Congregational churches were suffering serious loss of power from want of a 

morc anization. For thirty years he labored with great industry and 

H defect. Whatever may be the ultimate conclusion con- 

ing his theory of the church and his methods of organization, there can be 

-ubt that our churches owe more to him than to almost any other man of 



9* 

his generation for their growing sense of a common life and of the need and 
the possibility of more perfect union in their fellowship and their activities. 
With all his devotion to this great work, he was a faithful and beloved pastor. 
He died as he had lived, a brave, unselfish, Christian man." 

He was married, October 15, i860, to Mary Maria Gilman, of Churchville, 
N.Y., daughter of Calvin Gilman and Maria Hill, who survives him. 

Dr. Ross died of erysipelas, at Port Huron, Mich., May 13, 1893, a g e d 
sixty-two years. 

CLASS OF 1861. 

Samuel Russell Butler. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of J. Hunt Butler and Mary Ann Bowers ; born in Northampton, Mass., 
July 23, 1837 ; prepared for college at L. J. Dudley's classical school in North- 
ampton ; graduated at Williams College, 1858 ; studied in this Seminary, 1858-59, 
and afterwards, 1862-64, in Union Theological Seminary. He was licensed to 
preach by the Hampshire Association, meeting at Chesterfield, Mass., May 4, 
1864. The following summer in search of health he joined an expedition to 
Labrador, sojourning there, as he had done in previous seasons, at the missionary 
station established a few years before by the Canadian Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety of Montreal. A vacancy occurring in the mission at the close of the sum- 
mer he volunteered to remain on the coast for the winter, and this led to many 
years of arduous and faithful service there. He was ordained at the American 
Presbyterian Church, Montreal, Canada, September 10, 1866, and continued his 
work among the sailors and shoremen — in the summer at Caribou Island, in 
the winter at Esquimaux River — until 1870. Returning to the United States 
he preached as he had strength for short periods at Leeds (in Northampton), 
1870-71; at Hutchinson, Minn., 1872-73; and at Washington, Me. , 1873. The 
Labrador mission again calling for a man, he responded and remained there until 
compelled to give up work in 1880. Spending five years without charge in his 
Northampton home, in health resorts, and in foreign travel, he resumed pas- 
toral work at Mill River (in New Marlboro), Mass., 1885-86, continuing it after- 
wards from 1888 until a few weeks before his death, when his strength suddenly 
gave way and he sought help at the Clifton Springs Sanitarium. 

Of delicate constitution, Mr. Butler was constantly interrupted in his stud- 
ies for the ministry and his labors in the ministry by feeble health. But for 
Christ's sake and the gospel's he undertook work and endured hardship from 
which many stronger men would have shrunk. Of refined and scholarly tastes, 
fond of poetry, of music, of flowers, of drawing, of painting, and possessed of 
ample means to cultivate such tastes, he sacrificed all — except as he could use 
them to further his work — to labor for years on a rough and uncongenial coast. 
He loved whatsoever was pure and lovely and of good report, and hated evil with 
a perfect hatred. Of retiring and gentle disposition, he was unhesitating and 
uncompromising in following at whatever cost his conscientious convictions of 
truth and duty. The many who have come under his quiet influence, especially 
the youth whom he has encouraged and aided, will remember his pure life, his 
earnest faith, and his Christian fidelity, with grateful affection. 

Rev. Geo. E. Street (Class of 1863) writes of Mr. Butler : "That frail body 
of his held a beautiful spirit, refined, artistic, scholarly, devout. Gentle and 
affectionate in his ordinary demeanor, he was possessed of most positive con- 



9 2 

victions, which he could utter on occasions with surprising spirit, while back of 
him lay a history of work and self-denial which put to the blush what most men 
in strong, healthy bodies are doing. His memorial is in the abiding affection of 
those who knew him best and longest and were helped by his saintly influence." 
Mr. Butler died at Clifton Springs, N.Y., of exhaustion, March 25, 1893, 
in the fifty- sixth year of his age. He was unmarried. 

CLASS OF 1862. 

Lorenzo Johnson White. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Robert White (who lost both arms at the siege of Fort Erie in 1814, 
but lived to be the last survivor of the "Army of the Niagara") and Mary 
Duesbury Johnson ; born in Greenbush, town of Weathersfield, Vt., August 31, 
1S2S ; the family having removed to Ohio, he took his preparatory and collegiate 
course at Oberlin, graduating in 1851 ; after a few months of study in law under 
Hon. Salmon P. Chase, Washington,. D.C., and subsequent employment in the 
Department of the Interior, he entered Oberlin Theological Seminary, graduat- 
ing in 1S55 ; he was licensed to preach by the Cleveland Conference, at Collamer, 
Ohio, October 16, 1855. He was ordained over the church in Lyons, Io., June 7, 
1S58, having already supplied its pulpit for a year. This pastorate he resigned 
in 1S60, and studied as resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1860-62, supplying for 
a part of the time the church in South Reading (now Wakefield), Mass. He 
was then successively pastor at Amboy, 111., 1862-66; of the Plymouth Church, 
St. Paul, Minn., 1866-71 ; at Ripon, Wis., 1871-76; of the Old South Church, 
Reading, Mass., 1876-81 ; and at Green Bay, Wis., 1882-92. 

Mr. White was chaplain of the State Senate of Minnesota, 1866-68, and 
later acted as Commissioner of Indian Payments for Northern Minnesota. He 
published memorial sermons upon President Lincoln and General Grant; a 
historical discourse at the semi-centennial anniversary of the church at Green 
Pay in 1886; and another, entitled God's Leadership in our History, at the 
centennial anniversary of constitutional government in 1889. In a memorial 
address delivered at Green Bay, President Merrell of Ripon College paid a fine 
tribute to the intellectual ability, moral earnestness, and godly character of Mr. 
White. He contended all his life with infirm health, and died in a foreign land 
while seeking its restoration. His last sermon, preached two weeks before his 
death in a suburb of London, was from the text, "I shall be satisfied, when 
I awake, with thy likeness." 

Mr. White was married, January 28, 1857, to Eliza Dudley Newhall, of 
Lyndon, 111., daughter of Augustine Washington Newhall and Jane Dudley. 
She survives him, with three sons, one of whom, Rev. Frank N. White (Class 
of 1 88 1), is a missionary in Japan, and one daughter, a teacher in Boston. 

Mr. White died in London, England, January 10, 1893, of bronchial pneu- 
monia, at the age of sixty -four years. 

CLASS OP 1870. 

Francis Tneodore Ingalls, D.D. 

<m of Dea. Elias Theodore Ingalls and Eliza Chase; born in Haverhill, 

. January 3, 1844; prepared for college at the Haverhill High School; 

graduated at Williams College, 1864; studied one year in Princeton Seminary, 

1864-65; spent three years as a private tutor at Fishkill-on-the- Hudson ; and 



93 

finished his theological course at this Seminary, 1868-70. He was approbated 
to preach by the Essex North Association, meeting at Salisbury Beach, Sep- 
tember 14, 1869. He was ordained pastor of the church at Olathe, Kan., 
December 20, 1870, and remained there two years. He was pastor at Atchison, 
Kan., from 1872 to 1884, and at Emporia, Kan., from 1884 to 1887. He was 
then elected president of Drury College, Springfield, Mo., and continued in that 
office until his death. 

Williams College and Washburn College both conferred upon him the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity in iSSS; he was a trustee of the last named col- 
lege and a regent of the University of Kansas. Rev. Dr. Henry A. Stimson 
(Class of 1S69), who knew him well both in Andover and at the West, 
thus writes of him : " Ingalls was always the same unselfish, gentle, lovable 
man that he was at first ; his character ripening only with the advance of years, 
but not changing. He attached himself to every one with whom he came in 
contact, and died as devotedly loved even by the plainest people of the city in 
which he lived as he was by the students and professors with whom, by reason 
of his position, he was in most intimate relations. He was taken away just 
when it seemed that the doubtful years were giving place to those in which his 
best hopes were to be realized and his strenuous labors rewarded. He has 
stamped himself upon a large area of Western life, and for a long time his work 
will follow him in lives made beautiful and guided to high aspirations by his 
teachings and example. The few words allowed me can be little more than a 
flower laid upon the grave of one whom we all loved and long shall lament." 

Dr. Ingalls died at Springfield, Mo., of typhoid fever, August 5, 1892, aged 
forty-eight years. He was never married. 



CLASS OF 1871. 

Charles Dana Barrows, D.D. 

Son of Ruel Barrows, M.D., and Anne Kimball Dana; born in Fryeburg, 
Me., April 21, 1844; prepared for college at Fryeburg Academy; gradu- 
ated at Dartmouth College, 1864; was assistant teacher in Portland (Me.) 
High School, 1865; principal of Fryeburg Academy, 1865-67, and of Norway, 
(Me.) Academy, 1867-68; took the full course in this Seminary, 1868-71 ; was 
licensed to preach by the Essex North Association, meeting with Rev. Dr. D. T. 
Fiske, Newburyport, June 14, 1870. He was ordained as pastor of the Kirk 
Street Church, Lowell, Mass., July 13, 1871, and remained there ten years. 
He was then pastor of the First Church, San Francisco, Cal., from 1882 to 1890, 
when he returned to the East, living in his old home at Lowell until his removal 
to the Insane Asylum in Worcester several months before his death. 

Prof. J. W. Churchill (Class of 1868) thus writes of him: "Dr. Barrows was 
more than a brilliant preacher and sympathetic pastor; he was an admirable 
type of energetic, public- spirited citizenship. In his zealous efforts to promote 
the causes of temperance and social purity he met with violent opposition. His 
chivalrous spirit and disregard of personal consequences while in the path of 
what he considered to be his duty exposed him to the criticism of his friends 
and brought upon him the active and malignant malice of his enemies. The 
insidious growth of the malady which gradually impaired his mental and phys- 



94 

ical health for several years finally culminated in the brain disease of which he 
died at a comparatively early age." 

He wis married, May 16, 1S66, to Marion Merrill, daughter of Rev. Samuel 
Hill Merrill and Hannah Prentice. She survives him, with three sons and one 
daughter. 

Dr. Harrows died at Worcester, Mass., of paresis, September 14, 1892, 
aged forty-eight years. 

CLASS OF 1879. 

Silas Allen Potter, M.D. 

Son of Silas Potter and Caroline Daniels Allen; born in Boston, May 5, 
1854; prepared for college at the Roxbury Latin School ; graduated at Harvard 
College, 1876; studied in the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, 1876-77 ; 
in this Seminary, 1877-79. ^ e was licensed to preach by the Suffolk South As- 
sociation, June 3, 1878, but was never ordained. Obliged by throat trouble to 
give up his chosen profession, he decided to study medicine, and took the full 
coarse at Harvard Medical School, receiving his degree in 1884. The following 
year he began practice in Roxbury, and there remained until his death. 

Dr. Potter was a deacon in the Immanuel Church, Roxbury, and superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school; he was a member of the Boston Congregational 
Club, and for some years secretary of the Norfolk District Medical Society. 
Rev. Charles A. Dickinson, a Seminary classmate, writes : " He was a modest, 
whole-souled man, a fine scholar, and a true friend. He had large ability and a 
noble Christian spirit. Take him all in all, he was one of the rarest men in our 
class." Rev. W. A. Leland, also of the Class of 1879, adds : " Dr. Potter, best 
loved of those that knew him best, was unusually gifted and an excellent scholar. 
Conscientiously faithful in the use of generous privileges he was fitted in mind, 
heart, and character for a course of much more than usual usefulness. ... He 
devoted all to the Lord. His devotion exceeded his strength. Genial, courte- 
ous, of unwavering faith, of exalted purpose, he was the first in his class to at- 
tain his great reward and to enter the church triumphant." 

He was married, January 29, 1891, to Jennie Louise Childs, of Boston, 
daughter of John Lusk Childs and Sara Van Derlip Merriam. She survives 
him, with one son. 

Dr. Potter died of Hodgkin's disease, at Roxbury, Mass., July 10, 1892, 
aged thirty-eight years. 



NOT PREVIOUSLY REPORTED. 



GLASS OF 1832. 

William Perkins Apthorp. (A 'on- graduate.) 

-rge Henry Apthorp and Anna Perkins; born in Quincy, Mass., 

h 23, 1806; graduated at Yale College, 1829, having taken his freshman 

year at Harvard; studied in this Seminary, 1829-31, and graduated at Princeton 

Seminary, 1832; licensed by Third Presbytery of New York ; home missionary, 

Raleigh, N.C., 1832-33 ; preached for a few months in Quincy, Mass., 1834, and 



95 

in Mendon, Mass., 1835. He was ordained by the Harmony Association at 
Ward (now Auburn), Mass., as a home missionary, April 20, 1836 ; was at Frank- 
lin, Fort Madison, and Denmark, Io., 1836-38 ; teacher in Dr. Nelson's Mission 
Institute, near Quincy, 111., 1838-48; preached at Oskaloosa, Io., 1848-52; at 
Port Byron, 111., 1852-53; in Massachusetts without charge, 1853-63, except one 
year, 1855-56, at Moultonborough, N.H. ; at Polk City, Io., 1862-65; Bowen's 
Prairie, Io., 1865-66; county agent of American Bible Society, Fairfield, Io., 
1867-68 ; from 1869 resided with his sons at Tallahassee, Fla. 

Mr. Apthorp was one of the good and faithful pioneers in Western home 
missionary work. Rev. Julius A. Reed {Reminiscences of Early Congregation- 
alism in Iowa) says that M he was the first resident Congregational minister in 
Iowa." While in Massachusetts he was a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society. 

He was married, December 1, 1836, to Mary Greene Thurston, of Green- 
wich, R.I., daughter of John Thurston and Susanna Andrews. She died De- 
cember 15, 1852. They had three sons and two daughters; two of the sons 
were graduates of Amherst College, and served in the Union Army in the War 
of the Rebellion, one falling in battle in Alabama ; one of the daughters is a 
teacher in the State Normal School at Oshkosh, Wis. 

Mr. Apthorp died of old age, at Tallahassee, Fla., March 14, 1883, being 
nearly seventy-seven years old. 



CLASS OP 1840. 

Moses Mighels Smart, M.D. (Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Gardiner Smart and Sally Mighels ; born in North Parsonsfield, Me., 
May 18, 1812; graduated at Waterville College (now Colby University), 1836, 
and at Bangor Theological Seminary, 1839; ordained (Free Will Baptist), 1838; 
resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1 839-40; principal of Free Will Baptist The- 
ological School, North Parsonsfield, Me., 1842-44 ; studied law and admitted to 
the York County (Me.) Bar, 1843 5 principal of Free Will Baptist Theological 
School, Dracut, Mass., 1842-44; and of same, removed to Whitesboro, N.Y., 
1844-49; studied at Central Medical College, Syracuse, N.Y., receiving his med- 
ical degree in 1850. He preached for a few years in Russia, N.Y., and about 
1866 returned to Whitesboro, and resided there until his death. He had a pri- 
vate school for several years, and was afterwards instructor in the ancient lan- 
guages at Whitestown Seminary, until the failure of his health two years before 
his death. Mr. Smart was an able and versatile scholar and writer. He was 
largely the originator of the Biblical School of his denomination. He published 
a Brief View of Christian Doctrine. 

He was married, August 26, 1840, to Caroline H. Matthews. She died 
October 26, 1856, and he married, second, Mary A. McMaster, who survived 
him. Of four sons and five daughters, two sons and two daughters were living 
at the time of his death. 

He died at Whitesboro, N.Y., of consumption, October 2, 1885, aged 
seventy- three years. 



96 



Twenty-nine of our number have died during the past year, as against 
forty reported last year and thirty-six the preceding year. The average age of 
these twenty-nine men is seventy-three years, two months, and twenty-seven 
days. Including two others whose deaths occurred in previous years, although 
not previously reported, the average age would be seventy-three years, four 
months, and twelve days. Three of the number had passed the age of ninety, 
six were between eighty and ninety, twelve between seventy and eighty, and all 
save three were over fifty. 

Rev. Peter Kimball, of the Class of 1826, died on the very day of our last 
annual meeting in the one hundredth year of his age. No other graduate of 
the Seminary has attained this age, nor so far as known has the graduate of any 
oth.er theological school in the land. Rev. David L. Hunn (Class of 1816) died 
at ninety-eight, Rev. Herman Halsey (Class of 181 5) at ninety- seven, and Dr. 
Leonard Withington (Class of 18 16) at ninety- five. 

Of the thirty-one whose names are recorded above, eighteen were full grad- 
uates, nine were non-graduates, and four studied here as resident licentiates. 
All had previously taken the full college course except one, and he had gradu- 
ated from a medical college. Six came from Dartmouth, five from Amherst, 
four from Oberlin, three each from Yale and Middlebury, two each from Har- 
vard and Williams, and one each from Brown, Bowdoin, Hamilton, Marietta, 
and Colby. 

Bliss and Noyes had been lifelong missionaries in the foreign field, Dr. 
Worcester an almost lifelong helper in the home department of the missionary 
service, and Daniel Butler (so frequently a participant in these annual gather- 
ings) an honored secretary of the Bible Society ; Flint and Potter were Chris- 
tian physicians ; Tyler a Christian lawyer ; Marsh and Fletcher Christian teach- 
ers ; Ingalls a college president, dying all too soon for the cause of Western 
education; while most of the others spent their lives as useful, faithful, and 
successful pastors. Two were in the Episcopal, two in the Presbyterian, and 
one in the Free Will Baptist communion. 

Mr. Isaac Watts Wheelwright, of the Class of 1825, living in his ninety- 
second year at South Byfield, Mass., is still the senior alumnus of the Seminary; 
Dr. Edward Beecher, of the Class of 1827, residing in Brooklyn, N.Y., is two 
years younger. 




ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1893-94. 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 13, 1894, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. 4. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street. 

1894. 



INDEX. 



102 
101 
III 



Class. Age. Page. 

1842. Cyrus Baldwin 82 112 

1834. Edward C. Bull . 86 

1832. Daniel C. Burt 85 

1841. George W. Cleaveland 77 

1840. Josiah G. Davis 79 II0 

1869. David A. Easton 50 128 

1842. Daniel Emerson 75 lI 3 

1837. Thomas K. Fessenden 80 105 

1840. Thomas P. Field 80 109 

1838. Daniel Goodwin 84 105 

1830. Charles P. Grosvenor 89 100 

1834. Aldin Grout 90 102 

1845. John P. Gulliver 74 116 

1850. Benjamin Judkins 73 123 

1845. Marcus R. Keep 78 118 

1843. Jo HN Lawrence 79 114 

1845. John H. M. Leland 72 118 

1855. Julius Y. Leonard 66 124 

1896. George P. Martin 28 133 

1847. James H. Means 70 121 

1847. Josiah Merrill 75 122 

1853. Thomas Morong 67 123 

1846. Edward D. Neill . 70 120 

1881. Albert F. Norcross 40 131 

1838. George C. Partridge . 80 106 

1880. Theodore C. Pease 40 129 

1828. Jeremiah Porter 88 99 

1891. Edward H. Pound 29 132 

1859. Henry J. Richardson 64 126 

1842. Luther H. Sheldon 78 113 

1835. Horatio Southgate 81 103 

1839. Charles E. Stevens 7 8 107 

1837. Thatcher Thayer 82 104 

1839. Samuel R. Thrall 83 108 

Philander Thurston 56 127 



2 5 



r868. 

1858. Edward P. Thwing 62 

1844. Richard Tolman 76 XI ^ 

1845. Moses H. Wells 79 II9 

1844. Charles Willey 7 g ng 

1871. John H. Worcester, Jr 47 I2 g 

Not Previously Reported. 

1855. Lucius D. Chapin 70 I34 

1838. John Jones ?6 I33 



N"EOROLOa-T. 



ALUMNI. 



GLASS OP 1828. 

Jeremiah Porter. (Xon-graJuatt.) 

Son of Dr. William Porter and Charlotte Williams; born in Hadley, Mass., 
December 27, 1S04 ; prepared for college at Hopkins Academy, Hadley, and 
with Rev. Dr. Alvan Hyde, of Lee, Man.; graduated at Williams College, 
1825; studied two years in this Seminary, 1S25-27; taught two years in a 
monitorial high school in Tr graduated at Princeton Seminary, 

1831. He was licensed by the Hampshire Central Association, April 27, 1831. 
He was ordained at Hadley, October 3, 1831, and under commission of the 
American Home Missionary Society started at once for service among the 
soldiers, Indian agents, and traders at Fort Brady (Sault de Ste. Marie), in 
Michigan Territory. This journey, by stage, Erie Canal, steamer, schooner, 
and birch-bark canoe (from Mackinaw), consumed two months. In 1833 he 
accompanied the troops to Fort Dearborn, at the mouth of the Chicago River, 
where he organized the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. He was stated 
supply at Peoria, 111., from 1835 until the murder of Lovejoy in 1837, and at 
Farmington, 111., from 1S37 to 1S40. He was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church, Green Bay, Wis., 1S40-58, and of the Edwards Congregational Church, 
Chicago, 1858-62. From 1S62 to 1865 he was chaplain of the First Illinois 
Light Artillery, continuing work among the soldiers in Texas, under the 
auspices of the Christian Commission, 1865-66. He was acting pastor at 
Prairie du Chien, Wis., 1S66-68, and at Brownsville, Texas, 1868-70. He 
was then appointed by President Grant to a chaplaincy in the regular army, 
in which he remained until 18S2, being stationed successively at Brownsville, 
Texas, 1870-73; at Fort Sill, Indian Territory, 1873-75; and at Fort D. A. 
Russell, Wyoming Territory, 1875-80. He was in California, under leave of 
absence, 1880-81, preaching for six months at Grass Valley; and afterwards 
resided with his children at Detroit, Mich., and at Beloit, Wis. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Williams College in 1886. 

Dr. Porter's ministerial career was a long and fruitful one. A descendant 
of godly ancestry, trained in the quietness of New England, his life was spent 
on the frontier among Indians, half-breeds, traders, soldiers, freedmen, and an 
eventful portion of it in the tumult of war. His wife, an early missionary 
teacher at John Jacob Astor's trading post of Mackinaw, was thoroughly 
identified with all his work, accompanying him to the war, and as field agent of 
the Sanitary Commission doing an incalculable service in hospitals and among 



IOO 

freedmen at Cairo, Vicksburg, Memphis, Chattanooga, and in Sherman's army, 
as later in her Rio Grande Seminary in Texas. 

Rev. Prof. Joseph Emerson, D.D., of Beloit (Class of 1845), writes of 
both : " Dr. Jeremiah Porter and his wife were notable examples of a most 
remarkable phase of character and influence — spirits of finest nature and 
nurture, sanctified by grace and appointed to long lives on the border, where 
the barbaric elements of civilization collide with aboriginal barbarism. Dr. 
Porter's life was for more than sixty years, half of our nation's life, mingled 
with the movement of civilization in all its length and breadth, from Mackinaw 
to Mexico, from Chicago to California. In the frontier post of the Northwest, 
in Chicago when it was only Fort Dearborn, as pastor of the first church in 
Wisconsin (except that of the Stockbridge Indians, to whom his ancestor, 
President Edwards, had ministered a century before) — all his life, in pastorate 
or camp, or field or hospital, he went about doing good." 

Dr. Porter was married, June 15, 1835, to Eliza Emily Chappell, of 
Rochester, N. Y., daughter of Lieut. Robert Chappell and Elizabeth Knee- 
land. She died in Santa Barbara, Cal., January 1, 1888. Of nine children, 
five died in infancy or youth. The three sons graduated at Beloit College. 
The youngest son, Rev. Henry Dwight Porter, D.D. (Class of 1870), and the 
daughter, Miss Mary H. Porter, have long been connected with the North 
China Mission. 

Dr. Porter died at Beloit, Wis., of old age, July 25, 1893, in his eighty- 
ninth year. 

CLASS OF 1830. 

Charles Payson Grosvenor. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Payson Grosvenor and Prudence Gray ; born in Pomfret, Conn., 
August 12, 1804; fitted for college with the Pomfret pastor and at Rome, 
N.Y.j graduated at Yale College, 1827, having taken his first two years at 
Amherst j studied in the Seminary two years, 1827-29, and graduated at Yale 
Divinity School, 1831. He was agent of the Connecticut Sabbath School Union 
for several years, traveling as far west as Missouri, and also editor of the so- 
ciety's publications. He was licensed to preach by the Windham (Conn.) As- 
sociation, in May, 1831, and ordained as pastor at Waterford, a village in Men- 
don, Mass., now Blackstone, July 16, 1834. He afterwards served the churches 
in Kingston, R.I., 1835-38; Scituate, R.I., 1838-47; Rehoboth, Mass., 1847-56; 
Stoneham, Mass., 1856-58; Canterbury, Conn., 1858-71; West Woodstock, 
Conn., 1871-74; Ashford, Conn., 1874-81. He afterwards resided at Pomfret 
until his removal in October, 1893, to tne residence of his son at Palmer, Mass. 
• Mr. Grosvenor's time and strength were devoted to pastoral service, 
although he often served on school boards and for a short time as principal 
of the Academy at Scituate. At one time during the "Dorr Rebellion" in 
Rhode Island he was compelled to serve as bearer of dispatches, and in the 
War of the Rebellion gave one winter of willing and effective service to the 
Christian Commission in Sheridan's army in the Shenandoah Valley. Rev. S. 
H. Fellowes, of Wauregan, Conn., writes of him: "Father Grosvenor, as he 
was familiarly called, was a man of genial disposition and loving spirit. He 
was a wise counselor, and his younger brethren in the ministry rejoiced to sit 



101 

at his feet and learn of one who, like Abraham, was ' the friend of God.' Con- 
servative in his belief, and loving the old paths, he was not afraid of what was 
new when it bore the marks of truth. As a preacher he set forth God's Word 
in a plain and simple way that appealed to the heart and conscience of his 
hearers. He stood in the forefront of all reformatory movements, having 
always the courage of his convictions. He took a lively interest even to the 

D national affairs, and rejoiced in the success of missionary organizations 
throughout the world. His memory is fragrant with his brethren in the min- 
istry and in the places where his life's work was done." 

Mr. Grosvenor was married, June 24, 1S35, to Cordelia Mathewson, of Pom- 
fret, Conn., daughter of Darius Mathewson and Mary Smith. She died March 
3, 1S36. He married, .second, April 9, 1S3S, Hannah Hagadorn Wells, of 
• !i, K.I., daughter of Thomas Robinson Wells and Maria Potter. She 
died November 6, 1S40. He married, third, May 19, 1842, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Foster, of 1 a, Conn., widow of Rev. Lewis Foster, and 

daughter of Justus II od Harriet Hotchkiss. She died November 4, 

Three children died in childhood. A son and a daughter survive; the 
latter is connected with the Sisterhood of the Holy Nativity, a Protestant 

•opal organization, in Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Grosvenor died of grip, at Palmer, Mass., December 23, 1893, a g e d 
eighty-nine years. 

CLASS OF 1832. 

Daniel Crane Burt. 

Son of Dean Burt and Polly Crane; born in Berkley, Mass., March 31, 
1S08; prepared for college at Bristol Academy, Taunton, and under private 
tuition at Berkley; graduated at Brown University, 1S28, and took the full course 
in this Seminary, 1S29-32. After preaching a few months at Bridgewater, 
X. II., he began service in the first Church, New Bedford, Mass., over which 
he was ordained, July 1, 1S35, and from which he was dismissed in 1857, after 
an arduous and faithful ministry of twenty-four years. He resided without 
charge at Berkley, 1S57-65 ; at Fairhaven, Mass., 1865-71 ; and at New Bed- 
ford from 1871 until his death. 

Rev. Dr. A. H. Quint (Class of 1852) writes of Mr. Burt : " His daughter 
was right in telling you that I ' knew and loved him.' I made his acquaint- 
ance shortly after he had finished his long and useful pastorate near by, and 
when he came into my church this ripened into an affectionate friendship, which 
it was a great privilege on my part to enjoy. His purity of life, his tenderness 
of spirit, his warmth of Christian faith, his wisdom in judgment, and his con- 
stant devotion to Christian work made him a most valued helper. People in 
trouble or sorrow always had his warmest practical sympathy. When I returned 
to New Bedford, as I often did, to call upon ' Father Burt ' was a pleasure 
I always looked for. A blameless and useful life had its fulfillment in a serene 
and universally honored old age." 

Mr. Burt was married, June 6, 1836, to Susan Jenney, of Fairhaven, Mass., 
daughter of Levi Jenney and Susan Proctor. She died September 8, 187 1. Of 
five children, one daughter alone survives. 

He died of heart failure, at New Bedford, Mass., February 25, 1894, in his 
eighty-sixth year. 



Aldin Grout. 



102 

CLASS OF 1834. 



Son of Joel Grout and Asenath Wilder; born in Pelham, Mass., Septem- 
ber 2, 1803; prepared for college at Amherst (Mass.) Academy; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1S31 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1831-34; was 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Prof. Ralph 
Emersorf, D.D., at Andover, April 1, 1834, at the same time with George 
Champion, Robert O. Dwight, Horatio B. Hackett, William R. Jewett, Phi- 
lander O. Powers, Asa D. Smith, and others of his class. He was ordained at 
Holden, Mass., November 19, 1834, as a missionary of the American Board to 
the Zulus of South Africa, and with eleven others sailed on a Boston bark the 
following month, but not arriving at Port Natal until a year later. From that 
time until his final retirement from the mission in 1870, he labored with un- 
wearied fidelity, zeal, and courage, though subjected to many hardships and 
difficulties peculiar to a pioneer work in that wild country among a barbarous 
and degraded people. Twice the mission was broken up by native wars. In 
one case Mr. Grout came to the United States, but soon returned again ; in the 
other, he got as far as Capetown, and there aroused so much interest in his 
work that the colonial governor there sent him back in the name of the queen. 
From 1870 he resided in Springfield, Mass., until, beloved and honored by all 
good people, he had filled out his fourscore years and ten. 

Rev. Josiah Tyler, another veteran of the same mission, writes from 
Florida : " Mr. Grout was wonderfully well adapted for the Zulu field. Hope 
and faith were his characteristics. He could wait a long time if it appeared to 
be God's will before baptizing his first convert, and he was called to do so. 
Few African missionaries had to 'rough it' as he did. Probably the greatest 
trial he ever had was when he was obliged to look upon the massacre of his 
little band of Christians one Monday at break of day. The Zulu king was 
jealous of Mr. Grout, who, as he said, 'was stealing away the affections of his 
people.' Mr. Grout's work in Africa was well done. Many Zulus, some of 
them now in heaven, regard him as their spiritual father. His memory to me 
and to multitudes of others will be precious." 

Mr. Grout was married, November 17, 1834, to Hannah Davis, of Holden, 
Mass., daughter of Ethan Davis and Sarah Hubbard. She died in Africa, 
February 24, 1836. He married, second, November 23, 1838, Charlotte Bailey, 
of Holden, Mass., daughter of James Bailey and Elizabeth Gleason. She sur- 
vives him, with two sons and two daughters. One daughter married Rev. Wil- 
liam Ireland (Class of 1848), and has been for thirty years a missionary among 
the Zulus; the other is the wife of Rev. Prof. Frank H. Foster (Class of 1877), 
of the Pacific Theological Seminary. 

Mr. Grout died at Springfield, Mass., of old age, February 12, 1894, aged 
ninety years. 

CLASS OF 1834. 

Edward Coleman Bull. {N on- graduate.) 

Son of Epaphras W. Bull, Esq., and Mary Wells; born in Danbury, Conn., 
August 7, 1807; prepared for college under private tuition at Danbury; gradu- 
ated at Yale College, 1826; studied law one year at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., com- 
pleting his course at Canandaigua, N. Y., and admitted to the bar there ; decided 



103 

to enter the ministry, and studied in this Seminary, 1831-32 ; graduated at the 
Theological Seminary of Virginia, 1834. He was ordained deacon in the Epis- 
copal Church by Bishop Griswold, September 26, 1834; officiated at Taunton 
and Cambridge, Mass., Phillipstown, N.Y., and Woodbury, Conn.; ordained 
priest in Boston in May, 1838 ; was rector at Brookfield, Conn., 1838-41 ; at 
Westport, Conn., 1841-47; and at Rye, N. Y., 1847-58. His health failing, he 
resided afterwards without charge at Brooklyn, N. Y., Bridgeport, Conn., Sara- 
toga Springs, N. Y., and, from 1872, at Tarrytown, N. Y. 

" In character he was quiet, unpretentious, and guileless. His wide range 
of reading and his clear and original views of men and of affairs made him a 
delightful companion to the few who were privileged to know him intimately. 
He was a consistent Christian, and his faitlv made his life one of absolute 
serenity, despite the infirmities and deprivations growing out of his extreme 
age." 

Mr. Bull was married, in June, 1847, to Anna Maria Waite, of Westport, 
Conn. She died in 1864. He married, second, June 26, 1867, Mary Elizabeth 
Putnam, of Saratoga Springs, N. Y., daughter of Benjamin Risley Putnam and 
Eunice Morgan, who survives him. 

Mr. Bull died of old age, at Tarrytown, N. Y., March 15, 1894, in his eighty- 
seventh year. 

GLASS OP 1835. 

Horatio Southgate, D.D. 

Son of Judge Horatio Southgate and Abigail McLellan; born in Portland, 
Me., July 5, 1812; prepared for college in Portland; graduated at Bowdoin Col- 
lege, 1832; took the full course in this Seminary, 1832-35 ; was ordained deacon 
in the Episcopal Church, July 12, 1835, at Trinity Church, Boston, by Bishop 
Griswold. In 1836 he was sent by the Board of Missions on a tour of investi- 
gation among the Mohammedans of Turkey and Persia. On his return he was 
ordained to the priesthood in St. Paul's Chapel, New York City, by Bishop 
Onderdonk, October 3, 1839, and was missionary in Constantinople, 1840-44. 
He was then consecrated missionary bishop for " the dominions and depend- 
encies of the Sultan of Turkey," October 26, 1844, in St. Peter's Church, Phila- 
delphia, and exercised the episcopal office in that country until 1849. I n ^5° 
he was elected bishop of California, but declined. In 1851 he organized 
St. Luke's Church in Portland, Me., now the cathedral church of that diocese. 
He was rector of the Church of the Advent, Boston, 1852-58, and of Zion 
Church, New York City, 1859-72. He afterwards resided at Falls Church, Va., 
at Ravenswood, L.I. (officiating for a time there at St. Thomas's Church), and 
from 1885 at Astoria, L.I. 

Besides his varied service in the church, at home and abroad, Bishop 
Southgate published several books : Narrative of a Tour through Armenia, 
Persia, etc., Narrative of a Visit to the Syrian Church of Mesopotamia, A Trea- 
tise on the A?itiquity, Doctrine, Ministry, and Worship of the Anglican Church, 
The War in the East, The Cross Above the Crescent : a Romance of Constanti- 
nople, and other volumes. He also contributed largely to magazines and re- 
views. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Columbia College 
in 1845. 

Dr. Southgate was married, January 29, 1839, to Elizabeth Southgate Brown, 



104 

of Portland, Me., daughter of William Brown and Octavia Southgate. She died 
August 10, 1850, and he married, second, December 28, 1864, Sarah Elizabeth 
Hutchinson, of New York City, daughter of Hiram Hutchinson and Mary Ann 
Luffberry. She survives him. Of thirteen children, nine are living. One son 
is a priest in the Roman Catholic Church and another is a lawyer in New York 
City. 

Bishop Southgate died of typhoid malaria, in Astoria, L. I., April 12, 1894, 
in his eighty-second year. 



CLASS OP 1837. 

Thatcher Thayer, D.D. 

Son of Capt. Nathaniel Thayer and Charlotte Baker; born in Boston, 
December 9, 181 1; prepared for college at Leicester (Mass.) Academy; grad- 
uated at Amherst College, 1831 ; teacher in Mt. Pleasant Institute, Amherst, 
1831-32, and at Hartford, Conn., 1832-33; tutor in Amherst College, 1833-34; 
took the full course in this Seminary, 1834-37 ; was licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Prof. Ralph Emerson, D.D., at Andover, 
April 11, 1837. He was ordained, February 13, 1839, at South Dennis, Mass., 
where he had already preached for some time, and remained pastor of the 
church there until 1841. He was installed over the United Congregational 
Church in Newport, R. I., November 16, 1841, and continued in that pas- 
torate until 1873, Dem g afterwards pastor emeritus. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the College of New 
Jersey in 1857, and was from i860 one of the trustees of Brown University, 
as also of the Rogers High School at Newport, which he was instrumental in 
founding. He had been for many years the chaplain of the Newport Artillery, 
and his annual discourses before that body were notable utterances. 

Rev. Prof. J.O.Murray, D.D., of Princeton, N.J. (Class of 1854) sends 
this tribute: "Dr. Thayer was eminently a scholar, to the very last keeping 
up his studious habits. He had a passion for history, philosophy, and the 
classics. During his active ministry his pulpit was his throne. Slipshod 
preparation for the Sunday services, either in sermon or devotional exercises, 
was his pet abhorrence. His library, which was very extensive, was chosen 
from all departments of learning except modern science; to that he was as 
little drawn as Cardinal Newman. Dr. Thayer's conversation was one of his 
marked points. It was charged full of pithy suggestion, sometimes flashed with 
keen sarcasm or was tempered with a more general humor. He had great 
power in story-telling, using it with singular effect. His temper was conserv- 
ative. Trained in early life as a Unitarian, he became a warm advocate of 
the older theology, disliked ' new departures,' was possibly wanting in sym- 
pathy with progress. But most of all he disliked what he called ' fuss ' in 
religion. He liked the quiet ways of the fathers. ' O that men would be 
good and keep still* he said on a public occasion. He loved the society of 
young men. Some of the brightest men in the New England college or pulpit 
or bar, men like Professors Putnam, of Dartmouth, Dunn and Diman, of Brown, 
and Judge Dwight Foster, of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts, were among 
his 'boys,' as he used to call them." 



Dr. Thayer was married, May 8, 1850, to Eliza De Wolf Vernon, of New- 
port, daughter of William Vernon, Esq., and Eliza De Wolf, who survives him. 

He died at Newport, R. I., of Bright's disease, March 17, 1894, aged eighty- 
two years. 

CLASS OF 1837. 

Thomas Kendall Fessenden. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Joseph Fessenden and Sibbel Holbrook, and grandson of Rev. 
Thomas Fessenden, of Walpole, N.H. ; born in Brattleboro, Vt., September 10, 
1813 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at the Berkshire 
Gymnasium, Pittsfield, Mass. ; entered the junior class of Williams College, 
graduating in 1833; in this Seminary, 1834-35; in Yale Divinity School, 1835-37, 
having also studied at Princeton Seminary a short time in the winter of 1837 ; 
was licensed by the Windham County (Vt.) Association in 1837, and preached 
at Hatfield, Mass., 1837-38. He was ordained at Norwich Falls, Conn., October 
16, 1839, and was dismissed from that church in 1841 ; preached at Cazenovia 
and Homer, N.Y., in 1842, and was installed pastor at Homer in 1843, remain- 
ing there till December, 1853; pastor at Ellington, Conn., 1855-64. He after- 
wards resided at Farmington, Conn., without pastoral charge, but engaged in 
varied and effective public service. He was a member of the State Legislature 
for three years and, as chairman of the Committee on Humane Institutions and 
State Commissioner appointed for the purpose, was instrumental in establishing 
the Connecticut Industrial School for Girls located at Middletown, of which 
he was a director for seventeen years and for ten years the secretary. He was 
for ten years the financial secretary and for a long time a trustee of the Hamp- 
ton (Va.) Normal and Agricultural School, and devoted himself with great 
earnestness and success to the interests of that institution. 

Rev. George L. Clark, of Farmington, reviewing in his memorial address 
Mr. Fessenden's long career of usefulness as a pastor and philanthropist, said: 
" With all his courtesy and gentleness he was a Puritan. He obeyed his con- 
science and he believed in God. The deep secret of his power and success was 
his moral and spiritual worth. With all that was genial and kindly, with the 
sparkle of wit and the flash of humor, his sense of duty was stern and immov- 
able, and the basis of this was his loyalty to Christ. His friendship with Jesus 
was tender and joyous. Almost his last articulate words were, ' The Lord is 
my shepherd.'" 

He was married, October 23, 1839, to Nancy Cowles, of Farmington, daugh- 
ter of Martin Cowles and Mary Wallis. She died February 10, 1888. 

Mr. Fessenden died of bronchitis, following the grip, January 18, 1894, in 
Farmington, Conn., aged eighty years. 

CLASS OP 1838. 

Daniel Goodwin. 

Son of Dea. Joshua Gooden and Elizabeth Jones ; born in Londonderry, 
N. H., January 25, 1809; prepared for college at Pinkerton Academy, Deny, 
N. H.; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1835 ; took the full course in this Sem- 
inary, 1835-38 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 10, 1838; was ordained at Brookline, N. H., 



io6 

February 27, 1839, and continued in that pastorate sixteen years. After sup- 
plying for short periods successively the churches at Hillsboro' Bridge, London- 
derry, and Derry, he served as pastor in Mason, N.H., twenty-one years, from 
1857 to 1878, residing there subsequently without charge. 

His long life in Mason, during his pastorate and after its close, was one of 
marked usefulness. In 1885 he represented the town in the State Legislature; 
served at different times as superintendent of schools, as town clerk five years, 
as postmaster eleven years, as notary public twenty-one years, and justice of 
the peace twenty- six years. Of pious ancestry and training, he was earnest and 
strong in his faith, in his character, in his preaching, and in his influence. A 
memorial paper, read before the Hollis Association by Rev. C. F. H. Crathern, 
says of him : " The love of Christ was the great constraining and restraining 
and sustaining influence of his life, and to make it known was the passion of 
his soul. Although he was a strong preacher, writing more sermons than he 
ever preached and preaching more sermons than he ever wrote, yet as a man 
of prayer he was mighty. He believed in prayer intensely. Prayer with him 
was talking with God, fellowship with the Eternal." 

He was married, February 12, 1839, to Julia Ann Shute, of Derry, N.H., 
daughter of Benjamin Shute and Lucy (Cross) Orr. She died September 10, 
1845. He married, second, August 24, 1846, Martha Boynton, of Pepperell, 
Mass., daughter of Maj. Eli Boynton and Mary McDonald. She died April 14, 
1S75. He married, third, Mrs. Lucy Jane Boynton, of Pepperell, daughter of 
John Blood and Susan Jewett, and widow of Eli Boynton, 2d. She survives 
him. He had three sons and four daughters, one son and one daughter having 
deceased. One of the daughters has been for many years a teacher under the 
American Missionary Association. 

Mr. Goodwin died of bronchitis, at Mason, N. H., December 30, 1893, being 
nearly eighty-five years old. 

GLASS OF 1838. 

George Cotton Partridge. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dea. Cotton Partridge and Hannah Huntington Lyman, daughter 
of Rev. Dr. Joseph Lyman, for fifty-four years pastor in Hatfield ; born in Hat- 
field, Mass., August 27, 1813; fitted for college at Hopkins Academy, Hadley; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1833; taught in Princeton (N.J.) Latin School, 
l8 33"34; in this Seminary, 1835-36; tutor at Amherst College, 1836-38, con- 
tinuing his theological study under President Humphrey. In 1838-39 he 
preached for a few months in Rochester, N.Y., and at the Seamen's Bethel, 
Portland, Me. He was ordained at Nantucket, Mass., November 21, 1839, and 
remained there two years; was pastor at Brimfield, Mass., 1842-47 ; and of the 
id Congregational Church, Greenfield, Mass., 1848-54. From 1854-60 he 
resided in Rockford, 111., without charge, but often preaching without compen- 
sation in villages and hamlets for miles around. He was acting pastor at 
Batavia, 111., 1860-66, and afterward resided there until his death. He was col- 
lector of internal revenue, 1866-67, and afterwards for many years a general 
insurance agent. He was for thirty years treasurer of the school funds for the 
township. 

Prof. William S. Tyler, D.D., of Amherst (Class of 1836), says of him : 



loy 

14 George Partridge was to me a friend indeed, true and near and dear. Those 
were sunny days when he and Bullard and I boarded together at Professor 
Snell's, and sung together half an hour after dinner or supper almost every day, 
and then went singing in our hearts to our college work. Shall not ' we three 
meet again' with songs of everlasting joy upon our heads? . . . Mr. Partridge 
loved to preach the gospel, and intermitted preaching and finally relinquished 
it only when his voice became too weak or his general health failed. He 
preached the great central truths of Christianity as they were held by his grand- 
father, Dr. Lyman, and his theological teacher, Dr. Humphrey, in their simplic- 
ity and purity, with great earnestness and often with much pungency and 
power. Tall, erect, of commanding form and attractive features, with a heart 
as large as his body and as warm as it was large, courteous in his manners, 
fastidious in his tastes, a Christian gentleman of the old school, he made 
friends, select, perhaps, rather than numerous, of the best men and women, 
and bound them to himself with hooks of steel. We give him joy of his long 
life of fourscore years, of his good work, and when, by reason of bodily infirmi- 
ties, life had become a weariness, we give him joy of his peaceful and happy 
entrance into rest." 

He was married, June 9, 1840, to Sophia Harmer Johns, of Canandaigua, 
N.Y., daughter of Rev. Evan Johns and Frances Lyman. She died January 31, 
1874. He had one son and two daughters, one of whom is the wife of Rev. 
A. J. Chittenden, of the Class of 1874. 

He died of bronchial pneumonia, in Batavia, 111., November 8, 1893, a g e d 
eighty years. 

GLASS OF 1839. 

Charles Emery Stevens. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Hon. Boswell Stevens and Catherine Hale Emery; born in Pem- 
broke, N. H., March 24, 1815 ; prepared for college at Pembroke Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1835; studied law with his father until the 
death of the latter, in 1836; studied in this Seminary two years, 1836-38; 
resided with his brother-in-law, Rev. Seth W. Banister (Class of 1839), at Hins- 
dale, Mass., 1841-46, being principal for a short time of the Mountain Semi- 
nary, Worthington, Mass. ; was editor of the New Hampshire Statesman, Con- 
cord, 1846; principal of Fitchburg (Mass.) Academy, 1847, and of the Barre 
(Mass.) High School, 1847-49. He edited the Barre Patriot, 1849-52, and the 
Worcester Daily Transcript as an organ of the Whig party in the presidential 
campaign of 1852. He was clerk in the Secretary of State's office, Boston, 
1853-54 (assisting to edit the Massachusetts Colonial Records), and literary 
reader and editor for Gould & Lincoln, publishers, Boston, 1855-58. He was 
Assistant Register of Probate and Insolvency for Worcester County, 1859-69, 
and Register, 1869-84, subsequently practicing law, especially in connection 
with wills and the administration of estates. 

Mr. Stevens possessed a fine taste in art, literature, and history. A nota- 
ble instance of his critical acumen deserves special record. While a student in 
this Seminary, in 1838, he read Macaulay's essay on Milton in the Edinburgh 
Review, that author being then comparatively little known in America. He 
carefully examined the late volumes of the Review, and, guided by the style 



io8 

alone, discovered several articles which he felt sure came from the same pen. 
His list was given to a young publishing firm in Boston, the genuineness of each 
article subsequently confirmed by correspondence with the editor and author, 
and the series issued in two volumes at Boston in 1840, being the first collec- 
tion of Macaulay's essays published on either side of the Atlantic. He pub- 
lished in 1856, Anthony Bums : a History ; in 1857, New Biographies of Illustrious 
Men, an original introduction to which, modestly signed " S. C. E.," contains 
a full account of the Macaulay publication ; in 1878, Church and Parish : a Club 
Essay, made by Rev. Dr. Samuel Wolcott (Class of 1837), a part of the pro- 
ceedings of the National Council; in 1890, Worcester Churches ; and other smaller 
books. Mr. Stevens was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society and the American Geographical Society, and one of the founders of the 
Worcester Congregational Club. Judge P. Emory Aldrich, in a memorial trib- 
ute read before the above named club, says of Mr. Stevens : " And so our friend 
and fellow member of this Society came to the close of a long and useful life — 
a life full of good deeds, of good thoughts, of wise and benevolent endeavor; 
full of modest and sweet courtesy, and without the remembrance in the closing 
hours of that life, as I verily believe, that he had ever designedly done a wrong 
to any human being." 

He was married, September 7, 1852, to Caroline Elizabeth Caldwell, of 
Barre, Mass., daughter of Capt. Seth Caldwell and Catherine Monroe Woods. 
She survives him, with one son, a graduate of Amherst College and a physi- 
cian in Worcester, and one daughter. 

Mr. Stevens died of pneumonia, at Worcester, Mass., December 13, 1893, 
in his seventy-ninth year. 

CLASS OF 1839. 

Samuel Rowley Thrall. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Chauncey Thrall, Esq., and Mary Chipman ; born. in West Rutland, 
Vt., January 16, 181 1; prepared for college at West Rutland Academy; grad- 
uated at Middlebury College, 1835. After teaching in St. Lawrence Academy, 
Potsdam, N.Y., for one year, he studied in this Seminary, 1836-39, although 
compelled by ill health to leave before graduation. He was licensed by the 
Rutland (Vt.) Association in the summer of 1839, and preached at Perkins- 
ville and Wells River, Vt., 1839-42; was ordained April 13, 1842, and con- 
tinued as pastor at Wells River until 1847. He was acting pastor at Hub- 
bardton, Vt., 1848-52; Cuttingsville, Vt., 1852-53; Weathersfield, 111., 1854-55; 
Tremont, 111., 1855-57; Bristol, 111., 1857-59; Rockport and Summer Hill, 111., 
1859-65; La Harpe, 111., 1865-69. In 1869 he removed to Galesburg, 111., in 
order to educate his children at Knox College, and served as traveling agent 
of the American Bible Society until 1880. From 1887 he resided with his 
daughter at West Salem and Boscobel, Wis. 

Rer. Joseph E. Roy, D.D., said of Mr. Thrall in the funeral sermon : "Of 
New England stock, from 1630 down, he was a manly man, a strong preacher, 
and a loving pastor. He had lived through this wondrous era in our country's 
history, his life nearly measuring the century, and he had had a hand in the 
molding of it. His record is on high. It was made on the earth; it was 
written upon human hearts; it was built into the character of individuals and 



109 

of churches where he had labored in the gospel. His sermons were after the 
old New England style, and that was the style for his day — a style that built 
up New England character and made it a blessing to our age and to all our 
land. He loved his profession and loved to honor it, and by it to honor his 
chief, the Saviour of the world." 

He was married, October 12, 1842, to Miriam Hunt Bowman, of Perkins- 
ville, Vt., daughter of Thaddeus Bowman, 3d, of Lexington, Mass., and Anna 
Hunt, of Concord, Mass. She died November 22, 1886. Of eight children, 
four died early. The three sons became Congregational ministers: Rev. 
Joseph B. Thrall, of Albany, N.Y. ; Rev. George S. Thrall, who died in 1886; 
Rev. William H. Thrall, home missionary superintendent for South Dakota; 
the daughter is the wife of Rev. E. W. Jenney (Class of 1873), formerly mis- 
sionary in Turkey, now pastor in Boscobel, Wis. 

Mr. Thrall died of old age and kidney disease, at Boscobel, Wis., February 
27, 1894, aged eighty-three years. 



GLASS OP 1840, 

Thomas Power Field, D.D. 

Son of Justin Field and Harriet Power; born in Northfield, Mass., Jan- 
uary 12, 1814; prepared for college at Northfield Academy; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1834; studied in this Seminary, 1836-37 and 1839-40, being 
tutor in Amherst College in the intervening years, 1837-39. He was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, 
Andover, April 7, 1840, and was ordained over the South Church in Danvers 
(now Peabody), Mass., October 8, 1840, remaining there ten years. He was 
pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, Troy, N. Y., 1850-53 ; professor of 
Rhetoric, Oratory, and English Literature at Amherst College, 1853-56; pastor 
of the First Congregational Church, New London, Conn., 1856-76; professor 
of Bibliography and Librarian, Amherst College, 1878; and from 1878 to 1886 
Samuel Green professor of Biblical History and Interpretation and the college 
pastor ; continued to reside in Amherst until his death. 

Amherst College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 
1861. Ex- President J. H. Seelye, D.D., in a letter read at the memorial service 
in Amherst, thus spoke of him : "... I confided in his literary taste, which, 
originally keen and discriminating, was kept polished and incisive by an ac- 
quaintance, rarely equaled in amplitude, with the best products of literature, 
especially in the highest ranges. I confided in his theological knowledge and 
his knowledge of the Scriptures, always clear and broad and reverent. But 
most of all, I confided in himself, in the purity of his conduct and the upright- 
ness of his character and the strength and genuineness of his Christian life. 
Of unfailing courtesy, his manners were never put on, but aptly appeared as the 
kindly expression of a kind soul. He was broad-minded, full of tolerance and 
sympathy, but with his own deep convictions of what was right and true." 

Prof. William S. Tyler, D.D. (Class of 1836), kindly sends an extract 
from his tribute which is to appear in the Obituary Record of Amherst College : 
" He was unquestionably the best read man and the best Hebrew scholar, and 
had the largest and choicest library and the widest knowledge of books in 



no 

every department of literature, ancient and modern, of any man in Amherst or 
vicinity. He has preached ably and acceptably in the college and in the neigh- 
boring churches, but his best sermon, which he has preached every day of every 
has been his beautiful every-day life. . . . The whole community mourns 
his loss. But we give him joy that he has gone, through so short and easy a 
passage, from so long and beautiful a life to a world where, like himself, all is 
beauty, purity, and peace." 

Dr. Field was married, January n, 1844, to Maria Augusta Daniels, of 
South Dan vers (now Peabody), Mass., daughter of Hon. Robert Shillaber 
Daniels and Lydia Abbott. She died July 2, 1864. He married, second, 
May 9, 1866, Charlotte Coit, of New London, Conn., daughter of Robert 
Coit, Esq., and Charlotte Coit. She died February 21, 1890, and he married 
her sister, Ellen Coit, November 4, 1891. She survives him. Of nine children, 
three are living. 

Dr. Field died of heart failure, at Amherst, Mass., May 16, 1894, aged 
eighty years. 

CLASS OP 1840. 

Josiah Gardner Davis, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Josiah Davis, Jr., and Elizabeth Gardner Waters, and grandson of 
Rev. Cornelius Waters, of Ashby, Mass. ; born in Concord, Mass., February 23, 
181 5; prepared for college at Concord Academy; graduated at Yale College, 
1S36; taught a private school for a few months in the academy building at 
Concord, 1836-37; studied in this Seminary, 1837-38; taught at Margaretta 
Furnace, Penn., 1838-39; finished his theological course at Union Seminary, 
1839-41. He was ordained, May 22, 1844, over the church at Amherst, N. H., 
and remained its pastor until his resignation in 1879, a period of thirty-five 
years. He continued to reside there afterwards until his death. 

In addition to the duties of this important pastorate he always bore a 
prominent and influential part in the affairs of the town. He superintended 
for many years the public schools, and was a prime mover in the foundation 
and enlargement of the public library. When a young man in Concord he was 
instrumental in founding there a Sabbath School Missionary Association, and 
always maintained an earnest and intelligent interest in the cause of missions, 
being for twenty years one of the corporate members of the American Board. 
He was for several years the secretary of the General Association of New 
Hampshire. Dartmouth College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity in 1866, and he was a trustee of that institution from 187 1 to 1891. 

represented the town in the Constitutional Convention of 1876. He 
published historical discourses delivered at the centennial anniversaries of the 
Hollia Association of Ministers, 1862, and of the dedication of the meeting 
house at Amherst, 1874, besides other occasional sermons. 

resident Samuel C. Bartlett, D.D. (Class of 1842), writes: "Dr. Davis 
est man, of a genial spirit, kindly in all his intercourse, and a fast, 
unwavering friend. He held well-defined and matured opinions, was firm and 
conciliatory in the maintenance of them, and open to conviction. As a minister, 
he was to an unusual degree methodical and faithful in pastoral labor, and held 
all church and parish matters thoroughly in hand. Though he was ready and 



Ill 

fluent in speech, his sermons were prepared with great care and were both 
thoughtful and practical. He had a sound judgment and marked business 
abilities, which made him a wise counselor both in deliberative and practical 
matters. These qualities were recognized in his long membership on the board 
of trustees of Dartmouth College, of which body he was for many years the 
clerk and one of its committee of finance, never failing to be promptly present 
and to give constant and earnest attention to the work in hand. In view of his 
long pastoral labors and his well-balanced qualities, it may be safely said that 
few ministers in New Hampshire have done a more faithful work or exerted a 
more evenly healthful influence." 

He was married, September 26, 1848, to Abba Atherton Spaulding, of Am- 
herst, daughter of Dr. Matthias Spaulding and Rebecca Wentworth Atherton. 
She survives him, with one daughter, the wife of Dr. George Atherton Spauld- 
ing, of New York City. 

Dr. Davis died of cerebral paralysis, at Amherst, N. H., March 14, 1894, 
aged seventy-nine years. 

CLASS OF 1841. 

George Washington Cleaveland. 

Son of John Cleaveland and Rebecca Woodbury, and great-grandson of 
Rev. John Cleaveland, of Chebacco Parish, Ipswich, now Essex; born in Salem, 
, December si, 1815 ; fitted for college under his kinsman, Dr. Nehemiah 
Cleaveland, at Dummer Academy, Byfield, Mass. ; entered the sophomore 
class of Bowdoin College and graduated in 1837 ; studied in this Seminary, 
1 837-38 ar »d 1839-41, having been principal of Orleans (Mass.) Academy during 
the intervening year. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 1841, and supplied 
the First Church, Marblehead, Mass., 1841-42, and the Presbyterian church, 
Waterford, Penn., 1842-43. In the summer of the latter year he made a long 
tour into the new region of the Northwest with reference to the home mission- 
ary work, for which he was ordained at Orleans, Mass., September 27, 1843. 
On his journey westward he stopped for a Sabbath at Waterford, and remained 
there six years, 1843-49. He removed then to the neighboring town of Harbor 
Creek, and served as pastor of the Presbyterian church there until his death, 
supplying also for several years a Welsh Presbyterian church in Green town- 
ship which he had organized — making in all fifty years of faithful, devoted, 
successful service. 

Rev. William Grassie, of Cambridgeboro, Penn. (Class of 1855), for many 
years settled near Mr. Cleaveland, writes of him: "He was a man of great 
faith and implicit trust in God, simple in habits and tender in speech, with an 
open side to humanity in all its moods, a rare comforter of those in affliction. 
He was a man of prayer, and showed it in the atmosphere he carried with 
him in his intercourse with men. He was devoted to his work and his people. 
The little church to which he had ministered for more than forty years had his 
best days and thoughts and lay on his mind to the last. He was a rare man 
— patient, faithful, unassuming, caring not for earthly renown, only for the 
honor that cometh from God." 

Mr. Cleaveland was married, September 27, 1843, t0 Keziah Sparrow Doane, 



112 

of Orleans, Mass., daughter of Capt. Seth Doane and Abigail Cole. She sur- 
vives him, with four sons and one daughter, one son and one daughter hav- 
ing deceased. One of his sons, Edwards Park Cleaveland, is a Presbyterian 
minister, now professor of Rhetoric in Adelbert College. 

Mr. Cleaveland died of nervous prostration and enlargement of the heart, 
at Harbor Creek, Penn., May 22, 1893, m nis seventy- eighth year. 



CLASS OP 1842. 

Cyrus Baldwin. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Isaac Baldwin and Bethiah Pool; born in Antrim, N.H., May 14, 
181 1 ; prepared for college at Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, N.H., and 
Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1839; studied 
one year in the Seminary, 1839-40, and then began his long and useful career 
as a teacher. He was principal of Thetford (Vt.) Academy for one term ; in- 
structor in Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N.H., fifteen years, 1840-55; 
principal of Union Academy, Palmyra, N.Y., 1855-57 ; in mercantile business, 
Providence, R.I., 1857-62; principal of Freehold (N.J.) Institute, 1862-68; re- 
sided in Galesville, Wis., 1868-69; returning to Meriden, taught in the Acad- 
emy, 1869-71; resided there, 1871-79; at Wilmot, N.H., 1879-86; and after- 
wards at Hill, N.H. 

Mr. Baldwin's longest and best service was at Meriden. When he retired 
from active teaching he was elected a trustee of the institution and remained 
such until his death. He attended the annual reunion of the alumni in Bos- 
ton the year before his death and made a vigorous speech. Hundreds of 
" K. U. A." pupils all over the land remember with gratitude his strong and 
helpful influence over them in the class-room, in the conference meetings, and 
through his occasional sermons in the village church. He published A Manual 
of Etymology and Syntax. 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D., of Philadelphia (Class of 1865), son of 
Dr. Cyrus S. Richards, for thirty-five years the principal at Meriden, writes : 
" Mr. Baldwin was a teacher of rare interest and power. With a mind singularly 
fertile and alert, an eagerness to communicate his knowledge and opinions, and 
a passion for accuracy, he made a deep impression upon his pupils. He was 
not content to follow the text-book ; he sought to wake up the dormant intel- 
lect and give it a broader horizon and a higher purpose. He was more anxious 
to mold character and kindle lofty aspirations in his students than to drill them 
in the mere technique of learning. His views were often original and ingenious, 
and he had a lively sympathy with all true progress. A devoted Christian and 
a painstaking scholar, his long career of usefulness in his chosen profession 
has had few equals in the academic annals of this country." 

Mr. Baldwin was married, November 1, 1841, to Hannah Shattuck, of 
Meriden, N.H., daughter of William Shattuck and Jane Stevens. She died 
November 26, 1886. Of eight children, two daughters alone survive; four 
children died in childhood; two sons, one a lawyer in Providence, R.I., the 
other a physician in Hill, N.H., died in 1892. 

He died of grip, at Hill, N.H., May 30, 1893, aged eighty- two years. 



H3 

CLASS OF 1842. 
Daniel Emerson. 

Son of Rev. Ralph Emerson, D.D. (professor of Ecclesiastical History in 
the Seminary from 1829 to 1853), and Eliza Rockwell; born in Norfolk, Conn., 
August 20, 1818; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; gradu- 
ated at Western Reserve College, 1839; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1839-42. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Dr. Justin Edwards at Andover, April 12, 1842; preached at Newton Falls, 
Ohio, 1842-43; was ordained at Copley, Ohio, June r, 1844; and was stated sup- 
ply under the " Plan of Union" in Presbyterian churches at Copley, 1844-45; 
at Flat Rock (in the township of Brownstown), Mich., 1846-49; at Springfield, 
Mo., 1S49-50; at West Ely, Mo., 1853. He taught at West Ely, 1851-52, and at 
Hannibal, Mo., 1854-55. He resided in Hannibal until 1857, removing then to 
Peninsula, Ohio. He taught one winter in the neighboring town of Northamp- 
ton and was for a short time county agent of the American Bible Society, but 
owing to slender health had no other professional charge. He wrote much for 
the local newspapers, and was for over twenty years superintendent of the Pen- 
insula Cemetery, which he tastefully adorned with his own hands. From 1885 
to the time of his death he resided in North Kingsville, Ohio. 

Rev. E. J. Comings, of Peninsula, who officiated at his funeral, writes: 
"Flowers were his delight. He was a great lover of everything beautiful in 
nature, in art, and in human character." Rev. Dr. C. F. Thwing, president of 
Western Reserve University (Class of 1879), sends this tribute : " It is a privi- 
lege to recall the characteristics of this blessed man. It is seldom that one finds 
so much tenderness of heart joined with a nature so manly. There was also in 
him a keenness of discrimination that is born of a prolonged classical training. 
He had a breadth of sympathy, too, which should characterize every educated 
man. It was said of some one that ' he loved God and little children; ' I may 
say of this brother that he loved God, his family, and his college." 

Mr. Emerson was married, April 9, 1844, to Harriet Newell Wilcox, of Rich- 
field, Ohio, daughter of Jeremiah Cullen Wilcox, M.D., and Lorena Amelia 
Bushnell. She died July 4, 1870. He married, second, September 4, 1877, 
Mrs. Harriet Newell Alfoid, daughter of Elijah Rockwell and Sarah Hall, and 
widow of Dr. Melancthon W. Alford, of Galesburg, Mich. She survives him. 
Of nine children, four died in childhood. 

Mr. Emerson died of gastric fever, following the grip, at North Kingsbury, 
Ohio, December 16, 1893, a S ed seventy-five years. 

GLASS OF 1842. 

Luther Harris Sheldon. 

Son of Rev. Luther Sheldon, D.D., and Sarah Johnson Harris; born in 
Easton, Mass., November 22, 1815; prepared for college at Castleton (Vt.) 
Seminary; graduated at Middlebury College, 1839; took the full course in 
this Seminary, 1839-42 ; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 12, 1842. He supplied for 
a few months, 1842-43, the First Presbyterian Church of Washington, D. C, 
preaching afterwards at South Dennis, Mass., and in New Hampshire. He 
was ordained at Townsend, Mass., August 1, 1844; was pastor there twelve 



H4 

years, and was then settled at Westborough, Mass., for eleven years, 1856-67. 
He was superintendent of the State Reform School, Jamesburg, N. J., 1867-74; 
resided at Andover, 1S74-76; was acting pastor at Easton, Mass., 1876-78; su- 
perintendent of State Reform School, at Westborough, Mass., 1878-80, residing 
afterwards in Andover. 

Mr. Sheldon was always intelligently and heartily interested in moral 
reforms and public progress. He was an early advocate of temperance and 
antislavery, and in the last year of the war went to the front as a Christian 
Commission delegate. In Townsend, Westborough, and Andover he served 
on the school committee board, and in Andover was a prominent supporter 
of the Farmers' Club. His official connection with institutions for criminal 
boys was an important part of his life work. He successfully inaugurated in 
New Jersey the system of the "open farm school," then only known in one 
other institution in the country, but since adopted in many States. 

Rev. Lathrop Taylor, of Wheaton, 111. (Class of 1842), on hearing of Mr. 
Sheldon's death, wrote: " I loved him dearly. We were classmates four years 
in college and room-mates three years in Andover. He was a genial companion 
and a man of pure and noble aspirations. He was a diligent student, not only 
of the Bible, but of general literature. He had comprehensive views of the 
work of the Christian minister. He heartily embraced and steadfastly main- 
tained the Edwardean views of theology. His style of preaching was prac- 
tical, and he spoke with unction and power. He was a true and godly man, 
and has finished his work with joy." 

Mr. Sheldon was married, July 24, 1844, to Sarah Hicks Flagg, of An- 
dover, daughter of Capt. Timothy Flagg (of the old-time publishing firm of 
Flagg & Gould) and Hannah Trow. She survives him, with their two sons 
and two daughters. 

He died at Andover, Mass., of organic disease of the heart, May 19, 1894, 
aged seventy-eight years. 

CLASS OF 1843. 

John Lawrence. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dea. Hubbard Lawrence and Mary Goss ; born in St. Johnsbury, 
Vt., May 21, 1814; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and 
Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H. ; entered Dartmouth College in 
1836, but left soon to engage in teaching, first in a family school at Lennox- 
ville, Canada, 1837, then under Rev. Samuel R. Hall, in Plymouth (N. H.) 
Academy, 1838; studied in Gilmanton (N. H.) Theological Seminary, 1840, 
and in this Seminary, 1840-41 ; taught under Ariel Parish in Westfield (Mass.) 
Academy, 1841-42; under Otis Lombard at Springfield, Mass., 1842-43, and 
conducting a private school of his own there, 1843-45; taught in Lyndon (Vt.) 
Academy, 1S45. Having been licensed to preach (by the Hampden Association) 
while at Springfield, in 1844, he was acting pastor at Alstead, N. H., 1846-47, 
and at Efooksett, N. H., 1847-48; ordained there August 3, 1848; acting pastor 
at Salem, N. H., 1849-52, and again, 1859-62, after a pastorate in Carlyle, 
Mass., of six years, 1853-59; acting pastor, Wilmington, Mass., 1862-63; 
preached at Wilton, Me., and at other churches in that vicinity, 1863-69. 
He resided afterwards without charge, although occasionally preaching, at 



H5 

Reading, Mass., St. Johnsbury, Vt., Cambridge, Mass., and, from 1891, with 
his daughters, at Elyria, Ohio. 

Mr. Lawrence served on school boards in the different towns where he 
was pastor, and often assisted young men in their classical studies. He was 
a delegate of the Christian Commission in Virginia in 1863. He published 
The Family of John Lawrence (a genealogy) in 1847, with supplementary edi- 
tions in 1857, 1869, 1876, and 1881 (the latter containing also The Family of 
Philip Goss and The Family of Selah Pomroy), and The History of Stanstead 
County, Canada, in 1874. A sermon of his on Care for the Soul was printed 
in 1886. He was a brother of Rev. Edward A. Lawrence, D.D., of the Class of 
1838. 

Mr. Lawrence was married, July 31, 1855, to Nancy Temple Wakefield, of 
Reading, Mass., daughter of Dea. Caleb Wakefield and Nancy Temple. She 
died in Reading, January 6, 1871. He had four sons and four daughters ; one 
of the sons died in infancy ; one of the daughters has been for several years a 
missionary of the American Board at Smyrna. 

Mr. Lawrence died of old age, at Elyria, Ohio, May 15, 1894, lacking six 
days of being eighty years old. 



CLASS OF 1844. 

Richard Tolman. 

Son of Capt. Stephen Tolman and Mary Pierce ; born in Dorchester, Mass., 
September 30, 1817; prepared for college at Dorchester Academy ; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1839 ; was principal of New Hartford (Conn.) Academy, 1839-40, 
and Hancock (N. H.) Academy, 1840-41 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1841-44, and continued his studies as Abbot resident, 1844-45. He was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Prof. Ralph Emerson at 
Andover, April 9, 1844, was ordained as first pastor of the Third (now Maple 
Street) Church, Danvers, Mass., September 17, 1845, an ^ remained there three 
years. He was pastor at South Dennis, Mass., 1849-52, and at Tewksbury, 
Mass., 1852-70. In the spring of the latter year severe pulmonary disease 
obliged him to give up his pastorate, and he went to Hampton, Va. He was 
so much improved by the climate that before the close of the year he became 
chaplain of the Normal Institute, being formally installed May 19, 1872, and 
performing the duties of that position with rare judgment, zeal, and efficiency 
for eight years. For eight years longer he remained in connection with the 
school, teaching a large "class of pastors for Bible study," and often preaching 
in the churches of the vicinity. From 1886 he resided in Arlington, Mass. 
Mr. Tolman represented Tewksbury in the State Legislature in 1866 and 1867. 
Three sermons of his were published. 

Rev. Leonard Tenney, of Waterbury, Vt., a Seminary classmate, writes : 
"Mr. Tolman and I were room-mates in the Seminary, and have been intimate 
friends up to the day of his death. As a man he was frugal, generous, and 
modest, yet bold and courageous ; a genial companion, always trustworthy — 
a man of sound wisdom and great capability. As a preacher he was logical, 
earnest, and persuasive. As a Christian he was devout, hopeful, conservative, 
and yet always ready to receive new light. It was his endeavor to know his 
whole duty and to perform it." In filling a statistical blank in 1892 Mr. Tol- 



. n6 

man wrote against " present employment : " "A cripple, calmly and cheerfully 
waiting for the dawn of heaven's eternal day." 

He was married, December i, 1S45, t0 Olivia Sweetser, of Reading, Mass., 
daughter of Thomas Sweetser and Olivia Richardson. She died June 20, 1891. 
They had eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom three daugh- 
ters survive. 

Mr. Tolman died at Arlington, Mass., of pneumonia, following the grip, 
January 2, 1894, aged seventy-six years. 

CLASS OF 1844. 

Charles Willey. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Dea. Jesse Willey and Lucy Perkins ; born at Derby, Vt., Septem- 
ber 9, 181 5; early education obtained at Derby Literary and Theological Insti- 
tute and other academies; studied theology with Rev. Samuel R. Hall, of 
Craftsbury, Vt. (previously principal of the "Teachers' Seminary," Andover) ; 
was licensed to preach by the Orleans (Vt.) Association, August 15, 1843; 
studied as resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1843-44, while waiting to join 
the Pawnee Mission, to which he and his wife had been appointed by the Amer- 
ican Board. War between hostile tribes caused a change of plans, and he be- 
gan to preach at Chichester, N.H., in 1844, where he was ordained, October 15, 
1845, and where he remained until 1850. He was afterwards acting pastor of 
churches in New Hampshire: Kingston, 1851-52; Loudon (Second Church), 
1853-57 ; Epsom, 1857-59; Barrington, 1859-65; Centre Harbor, 1865-68; 
Greenfield, 1868-69; Nelson, 1869-70; Swanzey, 1871-73. He preached at 
Bloomington and Blake's Prairie, Wis., 1873-75; and at Newfield, N. J., 
1875-88, continuing to reside at the latter place until his death. 

Mr. Willey, though prevented from pursuing a thorough course of study, 
labored for a full half century faithfully and successfully in home missionary 
fields, in Sabbath schools, and by personal influence. His last sermon, preached 
on the Sunday morning previous to his death, is said to have touched a large 
audience by its eloquence and earnestness. 

He was married, September 24, 1843, t0 Harriet Claggett, of Newport, N.H., 
daughter of Wentworth Claggett, Esq., and Jane McQuesten. She died Au- 
gust 20, 1847. He married, second, December 4, 1849, Charlotte Esther Kelly, 
of East Concord, N.H., daughter of Hon. Israel W. Kelly and Rebecca Fletcher. 
He had a son and a daughter, both deceased. 

Mr. Willey died of neuralgia of the heart, at Newfield, N.J., October 26, 
'^931 a g ed seventy-eight years. 

CLASS OF 1845. 

John Putnam Gulliver, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Dea. John Gulliver and Sarah Putnam; born in Boston, May 12, 
1819; graduated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1836, and at Yale College, 1840; 
was principal of Randolph (Mass.) Academy, 1840-42; studied in this Seminary, 
1842-43 ; in Yale Divinity School, 1843-44, returning here for the senior year, 
1844-45, a »d continuing his studies as resident licentiate, 1845-46; licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor at 



ii7 

Andover, April 7, 1845. He supplied the Main Street (afterwards the Broad- 
way) Church in Norwich, Conn., 1845-46 ; and was ordained as its pastor 
October 1, 1846, remaining there until 1865; was pastor of the New England 
Church, Chicago, 111., 1865-68 ; president of Knox College, Galesburg, 111., 
1868-72; pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Binghamton, N. Y., 1872-78. 
From 1878 to the time of his death he filled the newly endowed Stone professor- 
ship of the Relations of Christianity to the Secular Sciences. Although obliged 
by failing health to relinquish active work in this department in 1890, he de- 
voted himself to the preparation of a volume in the field of his special studies 
and kept his place as one of the Seminary preachers. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Iowa College in 1867, 
and that of Doctor of Laws from Iowa State University in 1869. When 
resident in Connecticut he was a Fellow of Yale College and was instrumental 
in the founding of the Norwich Free Academy. His address at the dedication 
of the Slater Memorial Hall of that institution was published, as well as his 
inaugural addresses at Galesburg and Andover and several occasional sermons. 
In early years he was a leading editorial contributor to the Independent, and 
was prominent in the proceedings of the National Congregational Council of 
1865 in Boston. 

In a published sketch of Professor Gulliver, Dr. C. F. P. Bancroft, of 
Andover (Class of 1867), wrote: "There was a strong element of the reformer 
in his temperament. The antislavery discussions in his academy days kindled 
his whole soul, and in the more serious and momentous struggle which resulted 
in the Civil War and emancipation he took a prominent part. Without civil or 
military appointment he threw himself into the great strife, and used all his 
powers of argument and eloquence in the maintenance of national unity and the 
triumph of liberty." 

Rev. Prof. J. M. Hoppin, D.D. (Class of 1845), writes : " Professor Gul- 
liver was my classmate both in Yale College and Andover Seminary. He was 
impulsive, bold, and positive, and yet was a truly humble man, desirous above 
all things to do the will of his divine Master. He was one of the strongest 
men intellectually of our class and one of our best scholars, but was influenced 
by his heart as well as his head. He was a born metaphysician, and showed 
this in the Seminary, delighting to try the edge of his mind on the toughest 
questions in theology. This did not hurt his style, which was remarkably clear 
and simple, resting on facts as well as logic. The educational work he did in 
Connecticut still stands, proving his sagacity and liberality of view. He was a 
noble man and true believer." 

Dr. Gulliver was married, September 8, 1845, to Frances Woodbury Curtis, 
of Torringford, Conn., daughter of Dea. Elizur Curtis and Amanda Steele, and 
sister of Rev. Lucius Curtis, of the Class of 1845. Sne died March 9, 1892. 
Two children died in childhood. Two sons and two daughters survive — Wil- 
liam C. Gulliver, Yale, 1870, counselor at law in New York; Francis Gulliver, 
of Andover; Miss Julia Gulliver, professor of philosophy in Rockford (111.) 
College ; and Miss Mary Gulliver, instructor in art at the Mary A. Burnham 
School, Northampton, Mass. 

Dr. Gulliver died at Andover, of pneumonia, January 25, 1894, in his 
seventy-fifth year. 



GLASS OF 1845. 

Marcus Rodman Keep. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Keep and Adotia Severance, and descendant of a French Hugue- 
not who settled in Longmeadow, Mass. ; born in Swanton, Vt, March 27, 1816; 
fitted for college at Addison County Grammar School, Middlebury, Vt. ; in 
Middlebury College three years, 1836-39, but did not graduate; studied in this 
Seminary one year, 1842-43, completing his course at Bangor Theological Sem- 
inary, where he graduated in 1846. He was licensed to preach by the Penobscot 
(Me.) Association in September, 1845 ; commissioned by the Home Missionary 
Society, June 26, 1846; and ordained at Bangor, Me., January 4, 1847. His whole 
life was spent in the home missionary service in Northeastern Maine — until 1862 
under the auspices of the Maine Missionary Society, after that time inde- 
pendently. From 1846 to 1848 he labored at Fort Kent and vicinity; from 
1848 to 1850, at Burlington and Passadumkeag. From 1850 to the time of his 
death he lived at Ashland (the town, however, being for a few years called Dalton), 
doing the work of a missionary at large in most of the towns and settlements 
of Aroostook County. 

He was thoroughly familiar with that whole region, and often served as 
guide to tourists to Mount Katahdin. He was all his life interested in forward- 
ing the interests of common schools ; he taught the first school in his town forty 
years ago ; has given talks on geology, which he made a special study, in the 
schools of the town within the past year ; and was buried at last from a new 
schoolhouse, in the building of which he had taken a deep interest, the school 
children following him to the grave. A local paper in its notice of Mr. Keep 
says : " He has probably officiated at over one thousand funerals and married 
over two hundred couples. He made many of his journeys — some of them a 
hundred miles or more — on foot and on snowshoes, and this even down to 
recent years. Being particularly a man of the people, he has tramped the hills, 
weeping with them that wept and rejoicing with them that rejoiced. Nothing 
so gave him joy as to encourage the efforts of those struggling for an education 
and for success in life. He was strong in his opinion, retaining from his an- 
cestors the inborn love of religion. His influence will endure long years to 
come, and probably no one will ever take his peculiar place among the thousands 
who knew and loved him." 

Mr. Keep was married, July 29, 1849, to Hannah Maria Taylor, of Burling- 
ton, Me., daughter of Col. Theodore Taylor and Mary Towle. She survives 
him, with one son, Rev. Elisha A. Keep, of Merrimack, N.H., of the Class of 
1888. Two daughters died in childhood and one at the age of twenty- one. 

Mr. Keep died at Ashland, Me., of heart disease, May 2, 1894, aged 
seventy- eight years. 

CLASS OP 1845. 

John Henry Martin Leland. 

Son of Hon. John Leland and Lydia Leland; born January 25, 1821, in 
Amherst, Mass.; prepared for college at Amherst Academy; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1840; studied medicine at Rochester, N.Y., 1840-41; in this 
Seminary, 1841-42 and 1843-45; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor, Andover, April 7, 1845. He preached in 



ii 9 

Gill, Mass., 1846-47 ; was ordained, October 13, 1847, at South Royalston, 
Mass. ; was pastor there, 1847-49, an ^ at Bethel, Me., 1850-53. He was acting 
pastor at Norwich (now Huntington), Mass., 1853-55, an ^ °f tne First Church 
in Palmer (Thorndike), Mass., 1855-58. He afterwards resided at Amherst 
without charge, although occasionally preaching — at one time supplying the 
church in Leverett for a year. He was a leading member of the First Church in 
Amherst, which he served as deacon, clerk, and Sunday-school superintendent. 

Rev. Edward P. Blodgett, of Greenwich, Mass. (Class of 1842), writes: "I 
have known Mr. Leland from our earliest days. Descended from a godly an- 
cestry, he was trained from early life in the ways of the Lord. His father, a 
noble man and for many years a deacon in the First Church in Amherst, dedi- 
cated him to God, the Church, and the Christian ministry. For several years 
he was an acceptable preacher and successful in the sacred calling. When he 
retired from the ministry he returned to the old homestead in Amherst, where 
he spent the remnant of his life, useful in various ways to the church into which 
he was spiritually born and where he was nursed in his early spiritual life." 

He was married, October 8, 1845, to Eliza Tryphena Leland, of Sherborn, 
Mass., daughter of Capt. Joseph Perry Leland and Tryphena Richardson, who 
survives him, with three daughters, one of whom is the wife of Rev. William H. 
Sybrandt, of Troy, N.Y. One daughter died in infancy. 

He died of paralysis, at Amherst, Mass., December 16, 1893, in the 
seventy- third year of his age. 



GLASS OF 1845. 

Moses Hemmenway Wells. 

Son of Rev. Nathaniel Wells and Eunice Hemmenway, and grandson of 
Rev. Dr. Moses Hemmenway, of Wells, Me. ; born in Deerfield, N. H., August 
27, 1814; prepared for college at Pembroke (N.H.) Academy; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1839; entered this Seminary in 1839, and graduated in 
1845, having been instructor in Phillips Academy, Andover, 1839-40; in Groton 
(Mass.) Academy (now Lawrence Academy), 1840; in Canandaigua (N.Y.) Acad- 
emy, 1840-42; and principal at Groton, 1844-45. He was licensed to preach 
by the Middlesex Union Association, at Harvard, Mass., and ordained at 
Pittsfield, N. H., November 19, 1845, remaining there eight years. He was 
principal of Berwick Academy, South Berwick, Me., 1853-55; then resuming 
the ministry was pastor in Hinsdale, N. H., 1855-65; Lyndon, Vt, 1866-71; 
Lower Waterford, Vt., 1871-78; Ascutneyville, Vt., 1880-83 (with residence at 
Claremont, N.H., from 1878 to 1884); Dummerston, Vt., 1884-86. From 1886 
he resided at Northfield, Mass., without charge. 

While residing in Claremont Mr. Wells was the superintendent of schools 
for three years. Wherever he was he was an earnest supporter of all good 
causes. An unostentatious man in thought and life, he always commanded the 
confidence and love of the people to whom he ministered and the brethren with 
whom he was associated. He was a deep student in spiritual things and held 
fast to the truth as it is in Jesus, yet kept abreast in his reading and sympathies 
with the trend of modern religious thought. Rev. Charles W. Thompson, of 
Westminster, Vt. (Class of i860), says of him : " Mr. Wells combined a clear, 
logical mind of more than average strength with deep and broad sympathies. 



120 

He had a fine and tender grain of sensibility, so that he could come very closely 
home to those who were his friends, and to them his memory will be very 
precious. If his toleration of those who held opposing views increased with 
increasing years, it was from his larger appreciation of the deep spiritual unity 
of those who love our common Lord." Rev. Theodore J. Clark, of Northfield 
(Class of 1841), writes: " He loved the work of the ministry, and in his last 
years often wrote sermons which he never expected to preach. He would fre- 
quently say, ' If I were to live my life over I would choose the same calling.' " 
On a statistical blank returned recently he wrote against the item of "present 
employment" this: " I mean to make it ' my meat to do the will of Him that 
sent me and to finish his work.' " 

Mr. Wells was married, February 22, 1844, to Ann Rebecca Votee, of New 
York City, daughter of Capt. Charles Votee and Aura Ives. She died April 5, 
1855. He married, second, May 1, 1857, Emily Merrill Taylor, of Hinsdale, 
N.H., daughter of Lewis Taylor and Lois Webster. Of three sons and three 
daughters, two sons and one daughter have died. One daughter was for several 
years a teacher in one of the "Mount Holyoke" schools of South Africa. 

Mr. Wells died at Northfield, Mass., of grip and heart disease, Decem- 
ber 31, 1893, aged seventy-nine years. 

GLASS OF 1346. 

Edward Duffield Neill, D.D. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dr. Henry Neill and Martha Duffield ; born in Philadelphia, Penn., 
August 9, 1823 ; prepared for college at the Academy of the University of 
Pennsylvania, and studied two years in the university ; entered the sophomore 
class of Amherst College, graduating there in 1842; spent one year, 1843-44, 
in this Seminary, and continued his theological study under Rev. Albert Barnes 
and Rev. Dr. Thomas Brainerd (Class of 1831), of Philadelphia. He was a 
home missionary at Elizabeth, 111., 1847-49, being licensed to preach by the 
Galena Presbytery in 1847, and ordained by the same body, April 26, 1848. He 
organized the First Presbyterian Church in St. Paul, Minn., in 1849, an d re- 
mained its pastor until 1855. He then preached in the upper part of the city 
and founded a church there, ever since known as the House of Hope, resigning 
that charge in i860. Later he connected himself with the Reformed Episcopal 
Church, and often "held Sunday services and preached in humble temples in 
out of the way places." 

But his ministerial service, earnest and successful as it was, was but a 
small part of the important work performed by Dr. Neill in and for Minnesota. 
He arrived in St. Paul a few days after the organization of the Territory in 
April, 1849, an d tne fi rst issue of the Pioneer (edited by James M. Goodhue, a 
Phillips Academy student of 1820) gave notice of his preaching at a school- 
house. He was foremost in establishing schools in the town, and in 1851 was 
made territorial superintendent of public instruction. In 1853 he founded the 
Baldwin School, and later the College of St. Paul, of which he was president, 
but which was closed before the war. He was chancellor of the University of 
Minnesota and superintendent of public instruction, 1858-61. He was chaplain 
of the 1st Minnesota Regiment and hospital chaplain from 1861 to 1864, when 
he became one of President Lincoln's private secretaries, continuing at the ex- 



121 

ecutive mansion in the same capacity until 1869, when he was sent to Dublin 
as United States Consul. Two years later he resigned and returned to Minne- 
sota in order to carry out his purpose, long cherished, of establishing a distinc- 
tively Christian college. Of this institution, at first called Jesus College, but 
afterwards Macalester College, with the Baldwin School as the preparatory 
department, Dr. Neill was president from 1872 to 1884, an d afterwards, until 
his death, professor of History, Literature, and Political Economy. 

Dr. Neill devoted much time to historical researches, and published several 
valuable works: History of Minnesota, Terra Maria, or Threads of Maryland 
Colonial History, English Colonization of America, Virginia Vetusta, Virginia 
Carolorum, A Concise History of Minnesota, and others. He contributed largely 
to the publications of the Minnesota Historical Society, of which he was a 
prominent member. He was also connected with the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society and other similar bodies. He received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from Lafayette College in 1866. Rev. Joseph H. Chandler, of St. 
Paul (Class of 1882), wrote to the Congregationalist : "Breaking away from a 
rich social circle in Philadelphia, Dr. Neill devoted himself in the beginning of 
his ministry to the frontier, and has unselfishly served the city and State which 
grew up around him to the end of his life. In his work as an author and edu- 
cator he was more conspicuous than as a preacher, but he never gave up preach- 
ing, and served various churches in their missionary stage, ministering to them 
in things temporal and spiritual. By his poverty many have been made rich." 

Dr. Neill was married, October 4, 1847, to Nancy Hall, of Snow Hill, Md., 
daughter of Capt. Richard Hall and Lavinia Hill. She survives him, with three 
sons and one daughter, the oldest son having died in 1883. 

Dr. Neill died of valvular disease of the heart, at St. Paul, Minn., Septem- 
ber 26, 1893, a o e d seventy years. 



GLASS OF 1847. 

James Howard Means, D.D. 

Son of James Means and Johanna Howard; born in Boston, Mass., De- 
cember 13, 1823; prepared for college at Boston Latin School; graduated at 
Harvard College, 1843; t0 °k tne full course in this Seminary, 1844-47; wa s 
licensed to preach by the Suffolk North Association, meeting in Boston with 
Rev. Seth Bliss (Class of 1825), April 27, 1847. Soon after graduating he began 
to assist Rev. John Codman, D.D., an early Visitor and benefactor of the Sem- 
inary, in the Second Church, Dorchester, Mass. Dr. Codman died in Decem- 
ber of that year, and Mr. Means was called to succeed him in the pastorate, 
being ordained July 13, 1848. To this church he ministered with loving fidelity 
for thirty years, retiring from active service m 1878. He continued to reside in 
Dorchester, and has been for much of the time in feeble health. 

Rev. Dr. James G. Vose, of Providence, R. I. (Class of 1S54), writes of 
him: "The early education of Dr. Means afforded- everything that could be 
desired in the way of home influence and culture. His training in school, col- 
lege, and Seminary gave him a thorough equipment for his work. Selected by 
the venerable Dr. Codman as his associate in the ministry, he was warmly wel- 
comed by the people and secured their fullest confidence. He was a most 



122 

attractive preacher^ a man of literary tastes and accomplishments, yet strong 
in his advocacy of important truths and doctrines. A small volume of ser- 
mons, printed in 1865, illustrates the substance and method of his preaching. 
But the printed page poorly suggests the graces of his person, his peculiar dig- 
nity, and happy adaptation to every call of public or social life. His prolonged 
illness and that of his beloved wife made his closing years a period of singular 
discipline, sustained, however, with increasing evidence of the power of Chris- 
tian faith, whose triumph grew clearer to the last. We may say of them both 
that, like the great Captain of our salvation, they were ' made perfect through 
sufferings.' " 

Williams College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 
1874. He was a corporate member of the American Board, president of the 
trustees of Armenia College in Turkey and of Bradford (Mass.) Academy, a 
trustee of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, secretary of the Boston City 
Missionary Society, and filled other positions of Christian service. Besides the 
volume mentioned by Dr. Vose, he published a historical discourse delivered at 
the seventieth anniversary of his church in 1878. 

Dr. Means was married, June 6, 1849, to Charlotte Abigail Johnson, of 
Boston, daughter of Samuel Johnson, Esq., and Charlotte Abigail Howe. She 
died October 28, 1893. Their four children survive, one of the sons, Rev. 
Frederic H. Means, being pastor of the church in Windham, Conn. 

Dr. Means died of gradual paralysis, at Dorchester, Mass., April 13, 1894, 
aged seventy years. 



CLASS OP 1847. 

Josiah Merrill. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Rev. Josiah Goodhue Merrill and Harriet Jones; born in Otis- 
field, Me., January 31, 1819; prepared for college at Gorham. (Me.) Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1841 ; took his theological course at Bangor 
Seminary, graduating in 1844. Having taught in Putney (Vt.) Academy, in 
1841 and 1842, he was licensed by the Penobscot (Me.) Association, in Septem- 
ber, 1843. ^ e preached for two years in Eastport, Me. ; was in Andover as a 
resident licentiate in 1847 '■> an( l was ordained, February 29, 1848, at White 
River Village, in Hartford, Vt., where he remained nine years. He was pastor 
at Wiscasset, Me., 1857-64 ; and afterwards supplied the church at South 
Franklin, Mass., 1867-77, having his residence at Cambridge and at Auburn- 
dale. He was acting pastor at Dummerston, Vt., 1880-83, an d at Troy, N. H., 
1883-91. He afterwards resided in Newton Centre, Mass., and (from 1893) in 
Lynn, Mass. 

Resolutions adopted by the Society of Christian Endeavor at Troy, N. H., 
bear witness to "his unselfish life, his gentleness, his purity of thought and 
utterance, his kind acts, and his earnest appeals to a higher and better life. 
In him was exemplified the highest type of the devoted pastor and Christian 
gentleman." 

Mr. Merrill was married, August 23, 1848, to Philomedia Henrietta Con- 
verse, of Portland, Me., daughter of Adolphus Bowles Converse and Pamelia 
Day. She died November 6, 1869. Of seven children, five are now living. 



123 

His eldest son, a graduate of Harvard College, is in the Customs Service in the 
Chinese Empire. 

Mr. Merrill died of exhaustion following an acute attack of jaundice, at 
Lynn, Mass., March 10, 1894, aged seventy- five years. 



CLASS OF 1850. 

Benjamin Judkins. 

Son of Benjamin Judkins and Abby Fuller; born in Boston, May 28, 1820; 
prepared for college at Leicester (Mass.) Academy; graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege, 1848 ; studied two years in this Seminary, 1848-50. He was ordained at 
Nantucket, Mass., April 1, 1851, and continued as pastor there till 1855; was 
the first pastor of the First Church, Somerville, 1856-58; of the Presbyterian 
church, Allentown, Penn., 1859-62; at Clinton, Mass., 1862-67; Keokuk, Io., 
1868-70. In the latter year he was confirmed in the Protestant Episcopal 
Church at Keokuk ; was ordained deacon, December 7, 1870, by Bishop Hunt- 
ington, at Jordan, N.Y. ; ordained priest by the same, at Windsor, Conn., 
July 10, 187 1. After ten years' service as rector of Grace Church there ill 
health compelled him to leave active ministerial labor, and purchasing a farm 
in West Dedham, Mass., he resided there, without pastoral charge but often 
preaching, until 1890, with the exception of two years, 1886-88, when he was 
rector of Trinity Church, Concord, Mass. Since 1890 he has resided with his 
son at Houghton, Mich., where he assisted in the editorial management of the 
Gazette published there. 

" He was a perfectly conscientious and devoted Christian, a broad and lib- 
eral churchman, a man who did good whenever and wherever he could possibly 
find an opportunity. Wherever his voice was heard there love sprang up for 
the speaker. With magnetic power he enchained his hearers, and every word 
uttered in those thrilling tones went from his heart to find a lodgment in the 
hearts of those who listened." 

He was married, September 24, 1850, to Sarah Morrill Mitchell, of Boston, 
daughter of Phinehas Mitchell and Sarah Morrill. She survives him, with one 
son and two daughters, one daughter having deceased. 

He died of a complication of diseases, at Houghton, Mich., February 26, 
1894, in his seventy-fourth year. 



CLASS OP 1853. 

Thomas Morong. 

Son of Thomas Morong and Jane Catherine Travers; born in Cahawba, 
Ala., April 15, 1827 ; came to Massachusetts when fourteen years old; prepared 
for college at Warren Academy, Woburn, Mass. ; graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1848; studied law in Harvard Law School, and with Hon. George W. 
Warren, Charlestown, 1849-50; took the full course in this Seminary, 1850-53; 
was licensed to preach by the Woburn Association, March 15, 1853; studied 
here as resident licentiate, 1853-54. He was ordained at Pepperell, Mass., 
April 12, 1854, and remained there one year. He was subsequently pastor 
at Iowa City, Io., 1856-58; Webster, Mass. (stated supply), 1859; Globe Vil- 



I2 4 

lage, Southbridge, Mass., 1860-63; Lanesville, Mass., 1863-6S; First Church, 
Ipswich, Mass., 1S6S-75; Ashland, Mass., 1876-S8. In 1888 he visited South 
America under the auspices of the Torrey Botanical Club, and made a large 
collection of plants (mostly in Paraguay) for Smithsonian Institute and Colum- 
bia College, a full enumeration of which he published in the Annals of the 
New York Academy of Sciences. Returning in December, 1890, he was curator 
of the Herbarium of Columbia College, New York, until his death. He de- 
livered lectures, also, on botany in Barnard College, in the Brooklyn Institute, 
and at the Summer School, Cold Spring, L. I. 

An Ipswich parishioner says of him : " Mr. Morong was not a man of 
one idea. He was many-sided. This gave variety in his written and spoken 
addresses and made his conversation both entertaining and instructive. His 
love for nature in its varying aspects was most attractive. In a series of dis- 
courses, enriched by his botanical knowledge, he easily led the hearer up from 
nature to nature's God." Rev. Dr. H. J. Patrick, of West Newton, whose 
name follows that of Mr. Morong in both the Amherst and Andover cata- 
logues, writes: "He always bore himself with a natural courtesy, which may 
have come from his Southern birth. He was a bright man, quick and pithy 
in conversation, an original writer, a fine scholar, especially in the lan- 
guages, and an observant lover of nature. I remember meeting him in Bos- 
ton once, when he was pastor in Ashland, and he opened his heart to me, 
revealing the burden of his anxiety for the spiritual welfare of his young peo- 
ple. " In addition to botanical publications and articles he published The Great 
Destroyer, a temperance tract, The Beneficence of Pain, and several sermons. 

He was married, August 24, 1848, to Mary Lamson Bennett, of Woburn, 
Mass., daughter of Rev. Joseph Bennett (Class of 1821) and Mary Lamson. 
She died March 20, 1S93. He had two sons : one, a graduate of Amherst and 
of Harvard Medical School, is a physician in Boston; the other, a graduate of 
Harvard Dental School, died in South America in 1876. 

Mr. Morong died in Boston, of consumption, April 26, 1894, aged sixty- 
seven years. 



GLASS OP 1855. 

Julius Yale Leonard. 

Son of Louis Gigget Leonard and Hannah Royce ; born in Berkshire, N. Y., 
June 12, 1827; prepared for college at Berkshire High School and Cortland 
Academy, Homer, N.Y.; graduated at Yale College, 1851 ; taught in Crom- 
well (Conn.) Academy, 1851-52; studied at Yale Divinity School, 1852-54; at 
this Seminary, 1854-55; licensed to preach by New Haven Central Association, 
July 12, 1854; taught in Binghamton (N. Y.) Academy, 1856-57. Appointed by 
the American Board as missionary to Turkey, he took a course of lectures at 
Yale Medical College; was ordained at New Haven, Conn., June 14, 1857, and 
sailed from Boston on the bark Henry Hill in the following month. He 
labored with marked fidelity and devotion in the Turkish field for twenty-three 
years, first at Cesarea, 1857-60, and afterwards at Marsovan. Visiting this 
country in 1880 in enfeebled health — in part the result of injuries received the 
year before when attacked and beaten by Circassian robbers — he was never 
able to return to his chosen missionary service. He afterwards made his home 



125 

at New Haven, although often compelled to make long sojourns in Northern 
sanitariums or to spend the winter in the South. While in New Haven he was 
a member of the New Haven Colony Historical Society and of the Connecticut 
Academy of Arts and Sciences- 
Rev. A. H. Carrier, D.D., of Santa Barbara, Cal. (Class of 1856), writes : 
" As Mr. Leonard's classmate and roommate at Yale I can speak familiarly and 
heartily of him. He was a man with a conscience, with a reverence for things 
that are best — a foreordained minister or missionary. I never knew him to 
violate his high sense of duty. . . . Years passed before I saw him again. 
Then we met unexpectedly at Saratoga. His raven hair had become white as 
snow. But the missionary had clearly been what the college life foretokened. 
He came back with such harvest memories as might be expected from his seed- 
sowing. Like the Apostle Paul in adjacent fields he recounted with grateful 
heart what he had been permitted to do and to suffer for the Master's sake." 
Mr. Leonard's Seminary classmate, Rev. E. E. Strong, D.D., of the Amer- 
ican Board, says of him : " He was a man of devoted piety and true consecration 
to the Master's service. His missionary spirit, manifested during his Seminary 
course, seemed to increase in strength even after the state of his health forbade 
his return to the mission field. For years he endured hardness as a good 
soldier of Jesus Christ, carrying the message of the gospel to the towns and 
villages of the regions about Marsovan, delighting in his work and greatly 
blessed therein by the Master whom he served." 

He married, June 16, 1857, Amelia Augusta Gilbert, of Hamden, Conn., 
daughter of Gibbs Gilbert and Amelia Heaton, who survives him. 

He died of congestion of the lungs, at Clifton Springs, N. Y., October 29, 
1893, a g ec * sixty-six years. 

GLASS OF 1858. 

Edward Payson Thwing, M.D. 

Son of Dea. Thomas Thwing and Grace Welch Barnes; born in Ware, 
Mass., August 25, 1830; prepared for college at Monson (Mass.) Academy; 
graduated at Harvard College, 1855; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1855-58. He was licensed to preach in December, 1857, and was ordained, 
September 22, 1858, as pastor of the St. Lawrence Street Church, Portland, 
Me., remaining there four years; pastor at Quincy, Mass., 1862-67; without 
charge, residing in Boston and Chelsea, 1867-69; acting pastor of Second 
Church (Saccarappa), Westbrook, Me., 1869-71 ; without charge, Portland, Me., 
1871-74; acting pastor, Church of the Covenant, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1876-79; 
of the Reformed Church, Peekskill, N. Y., 1881 ; of the First Identity Church, 
Brooklyn, 1884; of St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, Brooklyn, 1885-86. Be- 
sides these and many other occasional pastoral labors, he spent much time in 
giving instruction and lectures in elocution and rhetoric to private classes and 
in various institutions: Gorham (Me.) Academy, 1870-74; Tabernacle Lay 
College, Brooklyn, 1874-78; Female College, Kent's Hill, Me.; Oxford Nor- 
mal Institute, South Paris, Me. ; the Little Blue School, Farmington, Me. ; 
Dr. Cullis's Faith Training College, Boston ; Bethany Institute, New York ; 
Rutgers College Seminary, New York City, etc. 

He received in 1883, after a special course of study in connection with the 



126 

Illinois Wesleyan University, the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He was 
also much interested in psychic phenomena, and with others organized the New 
York Anthropological Society, of which he was president for four years. Later 
he took a course of medical study at the Long Island College Hospital, grad- 
uating in 1S86. He was a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, the 
King's County Medical Society, the Long Island Historical Society, and a large 
number of other historical and scientific bodies in this country and abroad. 
The following list of his publications is given in the memorial prepared by his 
children : Bible Sketches, Leaves from a Tourist' 's Journal, Biographies of his 
Father and of his Mother, Facts about Tobacco, The Preacher's Cabinet, Drill 
Book in Vocal Culture and Gesture, Outdoor Life in Europe, The Persian Queen, 
Handbook of Anthropology, Windows of Character, The King in His Beatify, 
Rambles from Russia to Spain, Ex Oriente. Besides these he published numer- 
ous sermons, lectures, and tracts, and contributed voluminously to religious and 
local journals. 

Dr. Thwing made seven different tours in Europe, sometimes supplying for 
several months Tolmer's Square Church, London, attending scientific meetings 
and gathering material for articles and lectures. In 1889, accompanied by his 
wife, he made an extended tour in Japan, China, and India, visiting missions 
and doing missionary work. They went again in 1892, and never returned. 
Parting with their son and daughter, who were assigned to an inland station, 
they went to Canton, and there remained in abundant labors until their death. 
Dr. Thwing was associated with Dr. Kerr, the veteran medical missionary of 
Canton, in the establishment of a free asylum for the poor insane of China, a 
project he did not live to see completed. 

Rev. William J. Batt, of the Concord Reformatory, writes warmly of his 
classmate, and calls attention to the closing words of Dr. Thwing at the reunion 
of the class in 1888 : "The line is growing slender, brothers. One after another 
is dropping out of the ranks. We are all looking at life's work in the light of 
the setting sun. What chequered scenes we have passed through since we 
stood here in 1858 on the threshold of that blessed ministry we must all close 
so soon." 

Dr. Thwing was married, December 28, 1859, to Susan Maria Waite, of 
Portland, Me., daughter of Deacon Edward Waite and Mary Hastings Mills. 
She died in Canton, June 18, 1893. Of ten children, five died in early child- 
hood ; three sons and two daughters are living ; one son is a medical missionary 
in Alaska, and a son and daughter missionaries of the Presbyterian Board in 
China. 

Dr. Thwing died of typhoid fever, in Canton, China, May 9, 1893, m nis 
sixty-third year. 

GLASS OF 1859. 

Henry Jackson Richardson. 

Son of Daniel Richardson and Olive Berry Perkins; born in Middleton, 
Mass., June 23, 1829; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1855; taught in Topsfield (Mass.) Academy, 
1855-56, as also in the summer term of 1857; took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1856-59; licensed to preach by Essex South Association, March 1, 1859. 



127 

He was ordained at Lincoln, Mass., September 6, i860, having already preached 
there for one year. He remained in this pastorate till 1892, and retained the 
office of pastor emeritus until his death. 

Rev. A. H. Plumb, D.D., of Roxbury (Class of 1858), writes of Mr. Rich- 
ardson : " It was my great privilege to enjoy the confidence of this good man 
during our Seminary course and through all his ministry. Among his profes- 
sional associates he was highly esteemed for the transparent simplicity of his 
nature, his absolute freedom from ostentation, his quiet thoughtfulness, and 
the remarkable balance of his intellectual traits. In many respects his career 
seems to be an ideal one, both as to its power and its privilege, and should 
strongly attract young men to the holy office. For a man to abide through an 
entire generation with a cultured community in a serene tranquillity of con- 
tinuous and honored usefulness is certainly to live a successful and a happy 
life. No pastor could be more deeply enshrined in the affections of his flock 
than this shepherd, who in life and death could say, ' I dwell with mine own 
people.'" 

Rev. Edward E. Bradley (Advanced Class of 1892), his successor in the 
Lincoln pastorate, says of him : " His entire absence of self-seeking, his loyalty 
to the truth as he learned it, his consecrated devotion to the work of Christ, 
and his love for this church mark his life as one of single-minded service of 
his Master. His own words, spoken when he knew that his end was near, well 
sum up his life, ' I have not done a great work, but I have tried to be faithful 
to the Lord Jesus.' " 

He was married, June 26, 1864, to Mrs. Harriet Amelia French, of Lincoln, 
daughter of Dea. William Colburn and Nabby Reed, and widow of Theodore 
French. She survives him. 

He died of the grip, at Lincoln, Mass., December 19, 1893, in the sixty- 
fifth year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1868. 
Philander Thurston. 

Son of James Thurston and Maria Gleason; born in Pelham, Mass., 
May 25, 1837 ; prepared for college at Williston Seminary ; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1865; studied in Bangor Seminary, 1865-67; and graduated 
from this Seminary, 1868. He was licensed to preach by the Penobscot (Me.) 
Association, July 9, 1867. He preached at East Machias, Me., 1868-69, being 
in the meantime ordained to the ministry at Eastport, Me., January 19, 1869, 
He was installed pastor over the church at South Sudbury, Mass., February 1, 
1870, and remained there four years. He was pastor of the Village Church, 
Dorchester, Mass., 1875-80; and resided without charge at Mattapan, Mass., 
1880-84, though traveling in Europe in 1881. He was acting pastor in Sutton, 
Mass., 1884-90, afterwards residing there until March, 1892, when with en- 
feebled health he removed to Enfield, Mass., the home of his brothers. He 
supplied the church there from July, 1892, to April, 1893. He published a 
historical discourse delivered at the Village Church, Dorchester, in 1879. 

Rev. Charles E. Harwood (Class of 1869) writes of Mr. Thurston: "I 
knew him from his ninth year. We were classmates at home, at Easthampton, 
and at Amherst, and room-mates for a while at Andover. He was always enter- 



128 

prising, wide-awake, progressive in his thought, daring opposition or unpopu- 
larity in standing up for what he thought to be right. He withheld himself 
from no labor or self-denial in his course of education. In these somewhat 
easier days the actual story of his early struggles for self-support would be 
justly considered romantic. The success of his ministry did not consist in his 
being able to bring those to whom he ministered up to the standard of his own 
ideas of duty, but in his maintaining with himself that standard. He contended 
all his days with physical weakness, doing more hard work than many men of 
sound health. There was a divine fitness in his death on Forefathers' Day, 
as he had in his character so much that was best in the spirit of Pilgrim and 
Puritan." 

He was married, June 23, 1885, to Susan Amelia Hammond, of Pittsford, 
Vt., daughter of Augustus Hammond and Mary Penfield, who, with one son, 
survives him. 

Mr. Thurston died of failure of the digestive organs, at Enfield, Mass., 
December 21, 1893, in his fifty-seventh year. 



CLASS OF 1869. 

David Augustus Easton. 

Son of Brewster Gould Easton and Sophronia Harriet Farren; bom in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, August 10, 1843; fitted for college in the preparatory depart- 
ment of Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, and took one year of his col- 
legiate course there ; entered the sophomore class of Bowdoin College and 
graduated in 1865 5 studied law with Judge Alphonzo Taft, in Cincinnati, 
1865-66; deciding to enter the ministry, he took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1866-69; was licensed to preach by the Essex North Association, meeting 
with Professor Smyth at Andover, December 15, 1868. He was ordained, De- 
cember 29, 1869, pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Danbury, 
Conn., and remained there until 1875, although obliged by feeble health to 
employ an assistant and take long periods of rest. After preaching a short 
time at Noroton, Conn., he went to Naugatuck, Conn., and was acting pastor 
there from 1875 to l &79- Prostrated again by ill health, he was reluctantly com- 
pelled to leave the ministry, and for ten years was engaged in business in New 
York City. Becoming interested in the doctrines and methods of the Christian 
Scientists, he investigated and adopted them, graduating from the Massachu- 
setts Metaphysical College in 1889. In March, 1893, ne came to Boston as the 
pastor of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, worshiping in Chickering Hall, 
residing at first in Boston, afterwards in Cambridge. This year he called " the 
happiest year of his life. Hundreds of people testify what was done for them. 
He helped lay aside their burdens, conquer their fears, and serve their God in 
1 newness of mind ' by preaching to them the Christ- Truth in such a helpful, 
practical way." 

Mr. Easton was married, December 7, 1869, to Margaret Ellen Corser, of 
Portland, Me., daughter of Solomon Taft Corser and Margaret Fairbanks Saw- 
yer. She survives him, with one daughter. 

He died of consumption, in Cambridge, Mass., March 1, 1894, aged fifty 
years. 



129 
CLASS OF 1371. 

John Hopkins Worcester, Jr., D.D. {Resident Licentiate?) 

Son of Rev. John Hopkins Worcester, D.D., and Martha Porter Clark; 
born in St. Johnsbury, Vt., April 2, 1845; prepared for college with his father 
and private tutors at Burlington, Vt. ; graduated at the University of Vermont, 
1865; taught two years in his father's school for young ladies at Burlington; 
entered Union Theological Seminary in 1867 and graduated in 187 1, spending 
one year, 1869-70, in study at Berlin and Leipsic; was licensed to preach by the 
New York Congregational Association, April 5, 1871. He was acting professor 
of English Literature in the University of Vermont in 187 1, and was ordained, 
January 10, 1872, as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of South Orange, 
N. J., remaining there until 1883. He was pastor of the Sixth Presbyterian 
Church of Chicago from 1883 to 1891, when he became Roosevelt professor of 
Systematic Theology in Union Seminary, and continued such until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of Ver- 
mont in 1885. He was a preacher and teacher of divinity by inheritance, as 
well as by personal character and education. The descendant and relative of 
ministers and theologians in several generations — Jonathan Edwards, Samuel 
Hopkins, of Hadley, and Drs. Emmons, Austin, and Spring being among them 
— he worthily fulfilled the promise of his goodly heritage. Rev. S. J. McPher- 
son, D.D., thus speaks of him in his memorial sermon at Union Seminary : " His 
greatness consisted in his surpassing perspicuity of mind ; his rare capacity to 
separate a complex problem into its simple elements ; in his wonderful power 
of thorough and convincing statement; in his supreme loyalty to truth, and his 
courageous advocacy of it under all circumstances ; in his genuine humility of 
soul, which enabled him to see the truth easily, yet never permitted him to seek 
prominence for himself; in his sincere and unpretentious candor; in his loving 
catholicity of spirit, and in the complete consecration of his unusual powers and 
acquirements to the Light of the World." 

Professor Worcester was married, October 29, 1874, to Harriet Williams 
Strong, of Auburndale, Mass., daughter of Edward Strong, M.D., and Harriet 
Louisa Hayes. She survives him, with two sons and one daughter, another 
daughter having died in infancy. 

He died of heart disease, at Lakewood, N. J., February 5, 1893, in his 
forty- eighth year. 

CLASS OP 1880. 

Theodore Claudius Pease. 

Son of Claudius Buchanan Pease and Elvira Ann Smith ; born in Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., October 14, 1853; prepared for college at Professor Ripley's 
private school at Somers, Conn., and at Springfield (Mass.) High School; 
graduated at Harvard College, 1875; instructor in Rev. M. C. Stebbins's Class- 
ical Institute, Springfield, 1875; assistant professor in United States Naval 
Academy, Annapolis, Md., 1876; took the full course in this Seminary, 1877-80; 
was licensed by the Suffolk South Association, May 14, 1879. He was or- 
dained at West Lebanon, N. H., September 8, 1880, and remained there four 
years. He was then pastor of the First Church in Maiden, Mass., from 1884 



130 

until his acceptance of the professorship of Sacred Rhetoric in Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary in the summer of 1893, and his removal to Andover to begin 
its duties. His only public utterances in connection with this charge were his 
graceful speech at the Alumni dinner in June and his inaugural address in 
September. Nine weeks after the delivery of the latter his funeral was at- 
tended in the same chapel, and a large company followed him to the place of 
his burial, near the graves of Stuart and Porter, Edwards, Stowe, and Phelps. 

Professor Pease was a man of the finest scholarship and culture, and kept 
up his classical and literary studies to an unusual degree. He followed an 
extensive and methodical course of reading, the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures, 
the Latin of Thomas a Kempis, and the Italian of Dante (which he had read 
over seventy times) having their place in every day of the year ; besides which 
he read freely in the Greek classics and in modern French and Spanish writers. 
Nearly all of the four thousand volumes of his library had been carefully read 
by him, and most of them contained his discriminating annotations. He edited 
in 1S91 the Speeches and Lectures of Wendell Phillips. Many of his lighter 
poems were printed in the newspapers, and several hymns of his composition 
are contained in Songs, Old and New, for the Social Meeting and Sunday School. 
A sermon on The Etiigtna of Life was published in 1892. The earnestness of 
his religious life is beautifully shown by the message which he sent on the last 
day of his life to the students of the Seminary: "Tell them to preach the 
Lord Jesus. There is nothing else in life that is worth anything except to 
serve the Lord Jesus. He loves us all, and would save us all. Preach the 
Lord Jesus and save all you can." 

Prof. J. W. Churchill (Class of 1868) writes of his friend and colleague : 
" I lis friends in the churches where he had ministered could look back upon 
his admirable career with them in the light of noble achievement. We at 
Andover were regarding his future with us in the light of brilliant promise. 
The fine and peculiar traits of his personality, the lofty ideals of life which 
they naturally generated, that severity of mental and spiritual discipline, the 
accumulated fund of ministerial experience, were precisely the combination of 
qualities which are essential to a well-equipped professor of the theory and the 
art of preaching. He was not unmindful of the gravity of the task that he was 
called to assume. In his inaugural address he suggested most vividly and yet 
with characteristic modesty his sense of the importance of upholding the high 
ideals of the Christian ministry that have always been cherished in this seat 
of sacred learning. With felicitous phrase he referred to his three immediate 
predecessors — Professors Park, Phelps, and Tucker — all of whom he had 
known, and two of whom survive him. 

11 Solemn and tender were his closing words : • To keep these fair ideals 
fresh and living still, as in the dear and memorable days gone by, and to help 
my younger brethren to realize the growing opportunities, the urgent claims, 
the distinctive attractions of the ministry of today, is the task to which, with 
the blessing of God, I would now devote my life.' It is my sincere belief that 
Theodore Pease, had God given him the needed years, would have splendidly 
realized in his life and work 'those fair ideals,' and would worthily have main- 
tained the traditions of his chair of instruction. That inaugural address itself, 
in its scope and structure, reminded one of the architectural mind of Park; its 
clear and limpid style would have won the admiration of the elegant and exact- 



i3i 

ing Phelps ; and his sympathy with the vital relations of the Christian ministry 
to the social life of mankind declared his kinship with the passion for humanity 
that characterized the ideal modern minister in the teaching and example of 
President Tucker. 

" The delivery of the inaugural aroused in the students ardent expectations 
of enjoyment and benefit from coming into contact with the inspiration of his 
presence and teaching in the class-room, and from his criticism of their ser- 
mons. His reputation as a Biblical expert and as an accomplished linguist had 
heightened their admiration of him as a noble Christian scholar. Although 
his ill health had prevented him from meeting with his class even once in 
any professional capacity, he had welcomed the students to his home, and they 
had met him in other social ways. Eagerly they waited for his recovery, but 
they were destined to a grievous disappointment. 

1 God's finger touched him, and he slept.' 

Never did human willingness answer the divine will with more perfect submis- 
sion. His was the peace, not of hopes fulfilled, but of hopes uncomplainingly 
surrendered." 

Professor Pease was married, August 25, 1880, to Abby Frances Cutler, of 
Somers, Conn., daughter of Elijah Cutler and Mary Downing. She survives 
him, with one son, four children having died in infancy. 

He died at Andover, of typhoid fever, November 20, 1893, aged forty years. 



CLASS OF 1881. 

Albert Francis Norcross. 

Son of Dea. Jeremiah Norcross and Mary Pillsbury, and grandson of Rev. 
Levi Pillsbury, of VVinchendon, Mass.; born in Rindge, N.H., April 11, 1853; 
prepared for college at Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, N.H. ; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1878; took the full course in 'this Seminary, 1878-81. He 
was licensed by the Essex South Association at Salem, June 1, 1880, and was 
ordained at Shirley, Mass., August 31, 1881. He remained there three years, 
and then held pastorates successively at Rockport, Mass., 1885-91, and at Sher- 
burne, N.Y., from 1891 to the time of his death. 

Prof. Charles D. Adams, of Dartmouth College (Class of 1882), writes of 
him : " Mr. Norcross's life at Andover was from first to last a time of real joy 
to him. He seemed to find himself in a place where everything ministered to 
his one supreme desire. His own habit of mind was to put duty in the front of 
ail thought; the lectures upon Conscience in the theological course were a rev- 
elation to him, and he often referred to them afterwards with the greatest pleas- 
ure. ... In his three pastorates he simply carried out the promise of his 
student days — absolute fidelity and unselfishness in everything. He preached 
simple, practical sermons that were the outgrowth of his profound conviction 
and spiritual experience. But his great power lay in the force of his personal 
character as it became known to the people in his daily life. In his last parish 
he organized and led to success a most difficult temperance movement and with 
a bearing that commanded the respect of the very men whose business was 



stopped. . . . His was a short ministry, only twelve years. It was little known 
in the denomination at large; it was devoted to three small villages with their 
outlying districts. Unobtrusive, modest, patient, the young pastor labored for 
individuals ; the fruits of his ministry are as rich as the sowing was faithful." 

He was married, August 24, 188 1, to Sarah French Stevens, of Wilton, 
N.H., daughter of David Stevens and Sarah French, who survives him, with 
two daughters. 

Mr. Norcross died of pneumonia, following the grip, at Sherburne, N.Y., 
November 2S, 1893, a S e d forty years. 



CLASS OF 1891. 

Edward Hinman Pound. {No >i- graduate.) 

Son of Col. William Pound and Sarah Ellen Hinman ; born in Greens- 
burg, Ind., June 17, 1863; took his preparatory course and collegiate course at 
Yankton College, graduating in 1887 ; preached for several months at Her- 
mosa, S. D., building a church there ; studied in this Seminary, 1888-89 5 a f ter 
laboring four months at Dead Horse Valley, Neb., went to Crawford, Neb., 
where he was ordained, December 17, 1889, and where he built a church. Ill 
health driving him to California in the spring of 1891, he supplied the Congre- 
gational church in Moreno for nine months, when the progress of his disease 
compelled him to lay down active work. He continued in Moreno until his 
death. 

President Ward (Class of 1868), in presenting Mr. Pound with his diploma, 
greeted him as the first graduate of the college, " the foremost man of a thou- 
sand years ! " Although he soon followed his president to a better world, his 
short life was crowded full of earnest service, cheerful self-sacrifice, and heroic 
endurance. Early bereft of his father, he gave himself to the care of his in- 
valid mother and sister until their death, and then brought his only brother to 
Andover when he entered the Seminary. He nursed him tenderly for a few 
months, and then carried his body to Dakota for burial. He returned to his 
study, but was soon obliged to seek a change of climate. He sought work too, 
and did it heartily and successfully. W T herever he went his simple-hearted ear- 
nestness and fearlessness won men. Miners and pioneers who did not believe 
in ministers believed in this one and helped him build churches. Into the 
church which he organized in California he received in the few months he 
ministered to it nearly fifty members. " While lying at the point of death 
he was visited, listened to, and loved by the entire community." 

Rev. W. B. D. Gray, of Yankton, writes: "Edward Hinman Pound, 
Yankton College's first graduate, was one of nature's noblemen. He stood 
at the head in every good word and work — a manly man, true and fearless to a 
fault. Danger was unthought of if only duty led. Life was not sweet enough 
to save at the expense of honor, duty, or Christian principle. He died as he 
lived, an earnest disciple of Christ, satisfied to go in the morning of his life 
because God called him." 

Mr. Pound was married, September 3, 1890, to Agnes Rutherford Mc- 
Giffert, of Ashtabula, Ohio, daughter of Rev. Joseph Nelson McGiffert, D.D., 



133 

and Harriet Whiting Cushman, and granddaughter of Rev. Ralph Cushman 
(Class of 1820), who survives him. 

He died of consumption, at Moreno, Cal., June 8, 1893, lacking nine days 
of being thirty years old. 

CLASS OF 1896. 

George Pumphrey Martin. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of George R Martin and Agnes P Shipley; born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, 
December 15, 1865; prepared for college at Mt. Vernon High School and the 
preparatory department at Oberlin ; his college studies were interrupted by 
service in teaching and by ill health, on account of which he spent two years in 
California and Arizona, being engaged while there in civil engineering; he re- 
turned to Oberlin College and graduated in 1893; ne joined the junior class in 
this Seminary in September, 1893, and pursued the usual course of study until 
March, when he was attacked by the disease which so soon and so sadly ended 
his earthly plans. 

From his Western home, which he was permitted to reach a week before 
his death, comes the testimony to his pure Christian life and his persistent 
endeavor against many obstacles to fit himself for the Christian ministry. One 
of his Seminary classmates expresses the feeling of all : " Mr. Martin was a 
man of great promise in his chosen calling. Of fine intellect and deep spiritual 
power, with a remarkable simplicity of nature and thoughtfulness for others, he 
had won a warm place in the hearts of his Andover classmates and friends. 
The ministry, toward which he had directed his energies, and, above all, the 
foreign missionary work in China, to which he had for years planned to devote 
himself, have lost an earnest, consecrated life." 

Mr. Martin died in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, of consumption, May 10, 1894, aged 
twenty-eight years. 



NOT PREVIOUSLY REPORTED. 



GLASS OP 1838. 

John Jones. 

Son of Joseph Jones and Ann Richardson; born in Lyndeborough, N. H., 
September 8, 1812; prepared for college at Francestown (N. H.) Academy and 
Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H. ; graduated at Dartmouth College, 
1834; taught in Gloucester, Mass, 1834-35; took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1835-38. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting 
with Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 10, 1838. After preaching one year at 
North Underhill, Vt., he began service, in 1840, at Chittenden, Vt., where he 
was ordained, July 1, 1841, and where he remained till 1844. He preached in 
Danville, Ind., 1844-45; an d afterwards served as agent of the New Hampshire 
Bible Society for Hillsborough County until 1850. He then taught for four 
years in Sandusky, Ohio ; was acting pastor at Earlville, 111., two years ; he 
afterwards served as agent of the American Bible Society for Northern Illinois 



134 

until 1S62. His health then failing he engaged in various employments in dif- 
ferent places, residing from 1874 in Colorado Springs, Col. " His heart 
seemed devoted to his work for Christ, and a deep spiritual- mindedness per- 
vaded all he did." 

He was married, October 28, 1841, to Allethenia Holt Fiske, of Wilton, 
N. H., daughter of Dea. Abel Fiske and Abigail Dale. She survives him, with 
one son and one daughter, six children having died in childhood. 

He died at Colorado Springs, Col., of kidney disease, June 23, 1889, in 
his seventy- seventh year. 

GLASS OF 1855. 

Lucius Delison Chapin. 

Son of Joseph Chapin and Fanny Farnum ; born at Butternuts, Otsego 
County, N.Y., September 23, 1821 ; prepared for college at Monson (Mass.) 
Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1851 ; taught in the Young Ladies' 
Seminary, Pittsfield, Mass., 1851-52; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1852-55, and was licensed to preach by the Essex South Association, March 6, 
1855. He was acting principal of the preparatory department of Beloit Col- 
lege, 1855-56; began his ministry with the First Presbyterian Church in Ann 
Arbor, Mich., in October, 1856, being ordained October 29, 1857, and remained 
there until 1863; was professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy in Michigan 
University, 1863-68, spending the last year of that time in Europe and studying 
at Halle and Berlin ; was pastor of an independent Congregational church at 
East Bloomfield, N. Y., 1868-72; was chancellor of Ingham University, Le 
Roy, N. Y., and professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, 1872-75; in Le Roy, 
1875—77, engaged in scientific investigations; resided in Chicago from 1877, 
preaching often, especially in the Presbyterian church at Hyde Park, and carry- 
ing on scientific pursuits until his removal to Florida a few months before his 
death. 

His special study in later years was in connection with iron and steel. He 
discovered and developed a new process of dephosphorizing iron and took out 
several patents. He published works on the Decarbonization of Pig Iron and the 
Dephosphorization of Pig Iron. The value of his investigations was recognized 
on the occasion of his visit to England in 1S86 by such men as Sir Lothian Bell 
and Sir Henry Bessemer. " He had indomitable energy, courage, and perse- 
verance to grapple with every obstacle which met him in practical business life. 
The highest hopes and broadest ambitions were his, together with the firmest 
and most childlike faith in his divine Master." 

He was married, July 17, 1856, to Louise White, of Utica, N. Y., daughter 
of Deacon Noah White and Fanny Moore. She died October II, 1861. He 
married, second, December 27, 1864, Mrs. Mary Frances Huggins, daughter of 
Judge A. D. Smith and Augusta Reed, of Milwaukee, Wis., and widow of Rev. 
William Sidney Huggins, of Kalamazoo, Mich., who survives him. One of his 
four sons and a daughter died in infancy; two sons were educated at Amherst 
College. 

Mr. Chapin died of bilious fever, at Philips, Fla., June 18, 1892, aged 
seventy years. 



135 



Forty names are placed on the record of the dead for the year 1893-94, 
as against twenty-nine for 1892-93 and forty for 1891-92. The average age of 
these forty men is seventy-one years, eight months, and fifteen days. Including 
two others who died in previous years, but were not reported, the average age 
would be seventy-two years and sixteen days. One had passed the age of 
ninety, thirteen were between eighty and ninety, seventeen between seventy 
and eighty, four between sixty and seventy, and only five below fifty. 

Of the forty- two men recorded above, twenty -six were full graduates, thir- 
teen took a partial course, and three studied here as resident licentiates. 
Eleven were educated at Amherst College, eight at Dartmouth, six at Yale, 
four at Harvard, three each at Bowdoin and Middlebury, two at Williams, and 
one each at Brown, Oberlin, Western Reserve, and Yankton; one alone had 
failed to take the college course. 

Two were professors in the Seminary — one just putting off the harness 
of long and honorable warfare, the other just girding it on with the brightest 
prospect of signal service to the institution ; Grout and Leonard had been faith- 
ful foreign missionaries, Thwing also giving his life at last in the same cause, 
while Jeremiah Porter and Dr. Neill laid foundations of Christian institutions 
in the far West ; Dr. Thayer, Dr. Means, Dr. Davis, with Wells and Rich- 
ardson, had seen long and fruitful service here in the East; Dr. Field, Mr. 
Fessenden, Mr. Sheldon, and Cyrus Baldwin had in different ways achieved 
success in educational or philanthropic work ; Norcross and Pound were in the 
morning of their day, and Martin had not finished his first year of preparation. 
Every one had done his own work and will have his own reward. 

Mr. Isaac Watts Wheelwright, our senior alumnus (Class of 1825), now in 
his ninety-third year, sends Christian greetings to his brethren from his home 
in South Byfield, Mass. Dr. Edward Beecher remains of the Class of 1827, 
and Professor Park of the Class of 1831. 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



Rev. Alexander S. Twombly, D.D., Moderator, 1893. 

Rev. Prof. Edward Y. Hincks, D.D., ^ 

Rev. B. M. Fullerton, D.D., I Committee, 

Rev. William J. Batt, [ 1893-94. 

Rev. Harry P. Dewey, J 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Secretary, 1892-95. 



NOTICE. 



This Obituary Record is published annually in connection 
with the meeting of the Alumni Association at the June anni- 
versaries. Alumni are earnestly requested to aid in its prepara- 
tion by communicating the fact of the death of any past member 
of the Seminary, together with any newspaper notices or memorial 
sketches. These, with change of address, or other information 
relating to the record of living alumni, should be sent to the 
Secretary at Andover. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1 894-95. 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 12, 1895, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. 5- 



BOSTON: 
Beacon Press : Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street. ^ 

1895- 



INDEX 



Class. Age. Page. 

i860. John Q. Bittinger 64 167 

1876. Charles N. Brainerd 44 172 

1839. Timothy G. Brainerd 86 150 

1850. Swift Byington 71 158 

1837. Hiram Carleton 82 146 

1845. Luther Clapp 74 155 

1838. Aaron M. Colton 85 148 

1844. John L. Dudley 82 154 

1847. Jonathan Edwards 7^ 157 

1852. Charles P. Felch 70 160 

1836. Eli W. Harrington 90 144 

1884. Henry S. Harrison 44 173 

1867. Edwin J. Hart 67 171 

1859. Austin Hazen 60 165 

1828. Henry Herrick 92 141 

1854. Elias B. Hillard 69 161 

1875. John H. Hincks 45 171 

1834. Frederic W. Holland 83 142 

1854. Samuel D. Hosmer 65 161 

1862. George W. Howe 61 169 

i860. Chester C. Humphrey 63 168 

1866. Alfred P. Johnson 58 170 

1855. George C. Knapp 71 162 

1890. Carletto F. Lewis 31 173 

1S36. Walter R. Long 83 145 

1837. John Lord 83 147 

1845. Jabez B. Lyman 73 156 

1836. John M. Mackie . 80 146 

1855. Mason Moore 71 163 

1857. Alpheus S. Nickerson 63 164 

1866. Bernard Paine 59 170 

1835. Calvin E. Park 83 143 

1858. William W. Parker 70 164 

1842. Anson H. Parmelee 83 152 

1841. Whitman Peck 79 151 

1828. Calvin N. Ransom 88 142 

1859. John H. Shedd 61 166 

1843. William G. T. Shedd 74 153 

1851. Henry M. Storrs 67 159 

1842. Lathrop Taylor 81 152 

1846. David Torrey 75 157 

1838. Charles W. Wood 80 149 



Visitors. 

Joshua N. Marshall 64 140 

Julius H. Seelye 70 139 



IsTBOBOLOGT. 



VISITORS. 

Julius Hawley Seelye, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Seth Seelye and Abigail Taylor; born in Bethel, Ct., September 14, 
1824; prepared for college while a clerk in his father's store at Bethel ; entered 
the sophomore class of Amherst College and graduated there, 1849 > took his 
theological course in Auburn Seminary, 1849-52 ; licensed to preach by the 
Presbytery of Cayuga (N. Y.), June 4, 1851, at the same time with his class- 
mate, Rev. Dr. R. R. Booth, the present moderator of the Presbyterian General 
Assembly ; studied in Germany, 1852-53 ; ordained by the Classis of Schenec- 
tady (N. Y.) as the pastor of the First Reformed Dutch Church in that city, 
August 10, 1853, remaining there until 1858 ; professor of Mental and Moral 
Philosophy, Amherst College, 1858-90, and from 1876 president of the college 
and pastor of the college church. Failing health compelling him to resign his 
position in 1890, he continued to reside at Amherst. 

Professor Seelye received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union 
College in 1862, and that of Doctor of Laws from Columbia College in 1876. 
He was lecturer on Foreign Missions in Andover Seminary, 1873-74, and one 
of the Board of Visitors of the Seminary, 1875-92, having been the president 
of the Board, 1879-90. He was a member of Congress from the Tenth Con- 
gressional District of Massachusetts, 1875-77. He served for many years as a 
trustee of Mt. Holyoke Seminary, as a corporate member of the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and as president of the Ameri- 
can Home Missionary Society and the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
He published a translation of Schwegler's History of Philosophy ; revised edi- 
tions of Hickok's Mental Science and Moral Science ; Ch ristian Missions ; The 
Way, the Trttth, the Life, being his Lectures to Educated Hindus (published first 
in Bombay) ; and two small text-books on Duty and Citizenship. 

Rev. N. G. Clark, D.D., LL.D. (Class of 1852), a close friend of Dr. Seelye's 
for many years, writes of him : "Dr. Seelye impressed all who met him as a 
strong man, of broad and comprehensive views, of generous sympathies, and of 
an elevation of character lifting him above everything low and narrow in thought 
or life and rising sometimes to heights of moral grandeur. It is not as a phi- 
losopher or a theologian that he will be remembered, but as president of Amherst 
College, where he brought his best thought in philosophy and in theology to 
bear upon the lives of the students. He held the institution fast to its evangel- 
ical principles, earning the confidence and generous support of its friends, while 
inspiring the students with something of his own high ideals of life and charac- 
ter, and drawing them personally to himself by his genuine sympathy and inter- 
est in their welfare. 

11 His mind was eminently practical rather than speculative. Hence he 
turned away from philosophical studies — in which he did little beyond trans- 



140 

lating Schwegler's History of Philosophy and editing for use as text-books some 
of the works of his favorite teacher, Dr. Hickok — though in his earlier years 
it had been expected that he would take up and develop Dr. Hickok's system 
of spiritual philosophy. The pressing needs of his fellow men turned his atten- 
tion to more practical lines of work and led him to interest himself in mission- 
ary enterprises, both home and foreign, and in the political welfare of his own 
country. No words seem to reveal his own Christian life more justly than the 
expression so often on his lips, ' O, the unsearchable riches of Christ ! ' They 
seem to have molded his thought and sentiment, and to have given them, if 
possible, a higher scope, while harmonizing with a philosophy which recognized 
the validity of the intuitions of man's spiritual nature. The result was a repose 
of spirit most fitly characterized by his own favorite word — serene. " 

Dr. Seelye was married, October 26, 1854, to Elizabeth Tillman James, of 
Albany, N. Y., daughter of Rev. William James, D.D., and Marcia Ames. She 
died March 5, 1881. One of his three daughters, the wife of Rev. James W. 
Bixler, died in 1894. His only son is professor of Greek in the University of 
Wooster (Ohio). 

Dr. Seelye died of paralysis of the nerves, at Amherst, Mass., May 12, 1895, 
aged seventy years. 

Hon. Joshua Newell Marshall. 

Son of Simeon Moore Marshall and Jennette Lamb Berry ; born in Dra- 
cut, Mass., May 22, 1830; prepared for college at Pinkerton Academy, Derry, 
N. H. ; graduated at Amherst College, 1853 ; studied law with Hon. Arthur P. 
Bonney, Lowell ; was admitted to the bar, 1855, and practiced in Hopkinton, 
Mass., 1855-56, and in Lowell afterwards until his death. He was a member 
of the House of Representatives, 1863-64, and of the Senate, 1867-69; one of 
the State Board of Harbor Commissioners, 1869-74; delegate to the National 
Republican Convention, 1S72. He was also at one time the city solicitor of 
Lowell, and was a trustee of the Central Savings Bank and of the Rogers Hall 
School. He was a member of the Board of Visitors of this Seminary from 1885 
until his death, and for several years the secretary of the board. 

Rev. John M. Greene, D.D., of Lowell, writes of him: "Joshua N. Mar- 
shall was my college classmate, and during the last twenty-five years in this 
busy city I have known him intimately. As a man of principle and character 
he had no superior. He stood firmly to the intelligent convictions of con- 
science. He never wavered from the path of duty because it was unpopular. 
He never trimmed his sails to catch the popular gale if the yielding of any 
principle was at stake. He stood very high in his profession. Governor 
Greenhalge said at the last meeting of the trustees of Rogers Hall, of which 
corporation Mr. Marshall was secretary, that 'Mr. Marshall was one of the 
foremost men in his profession in Middlesex County.' He was a man of ex- 
cellent judgment, kindly in his feelings, and unselfish in his life. He was a 
much respected member of the Kirk Street Church, and when in health taught 
a class in the Sunday school and attended the midweek prayer meeting. He 
was, without making any show of it, a pillar in the church. He was always 
an able and upright man, and a devoted and consistent Christian." 

Mr. Marshall was married, January II, 1858, to Georgiana Bliss Fiske, of 



141 

Upton, Mass., daughter of Elisha Bradish Fiske and Miriam Starkweather. 
She survives him, with two sons and one daughter. 

Mr. Marshall died of Bright's disease, at Lowell, Mass., March 2, 1895, in 
the sixty- fifth year of his age. 



ALUMNI. 



CLASS OF 1828. 

Henry Herrick. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Claudius Herrick and Hannah Pierpont ; born in Woodbridge, 
Ct., March 5, 1803 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; grad- 
uated at Yale College, 1822 ; taught in West Springfield, Mass., 1822-23 5 Berke- 
ley scholar and teacher in Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, 1823-25 ; 
teacher of penmanship in Phillips Academy, 1826-27 ; studied in this Seminary, 
1825-27, and graduated at Yale Divinity School in 1828; preached at Middleton 
and Saugus, Mass., 1828-29; ordained at Humphreysville (now Seymour), Ct., 
April 14, 1830; home missionary in Illinois, 1830-31 ; engaged in Sunday school 
and other agencies in New England, 1832-34; principal of female academies 
in Knoxville, Tenn., Somerville and Moulton, Ala, 1835-42; home missionary 
afterwards until 1867 (Canada East, 1844; Clintonville, N. Y., 1845-49; Ticon- 
deroga, N. Y., and vicinity, 1849-53; Middlefield, Mass., 1853 ; Archbald, Pa., 
1854-55; Colchester, N.Y., 1856-58; Exeter, N.Y., and vicinity, 1858-67); 
from 1867 resided at North Woodstock, Ct. 

Mr. Herrick gave most of his life to pioneer work as teacher and home 
missionary, seeking out and occupying hard fields with self-denying devotion, 
and everywhere striving to inspire youth with a desire for higher education. 
Joseph Cook and Prof. G. Frederick Wright are among those who have grate- 
fully acknowledged his influence in this way. Rev. Charles W. Thompson, D.D. 
(Class of i860), at one time Mr. Herrick's pastor at North Woodstock, writes: 
" The memory of my association with Mr. Herrick is very pleasant. I never 
knew a man who combined so much genuine humility with so much real ability. 
He was conscientious, pure-minded, and unworldly. He did not seek large 
things for himself in this world, but, it seems to me, that he was so ' other- 
worldly ' while here that he will be high above many of us 'over there.'" 

Mr. Herrick was married, February 19, 1835, to Sarah Maria Wright, of 
Windsor, Mass., daughter of Asahel Wright, M.D., and Lydia Worthington. 
She survives him, with four sons and three daughters, two children having died 
in infancy. One of the sons, Rev. E. P. Herrick, is a Congregational minister at 
Tampa, Fla. ; one of the daughters is the wife of Rev. J. T. Nichols, of Seattle, 
Wash., and another of Deacon George Gould, of Andover. 

Mr. Herrick died of old age, in North Woodstock, Ct., March II, 1895, 
aged ninety- two years. 



142 

Calvin Noyes Ransom. 

Son of Col. Theophilus Ransom (an officer in the War of 1812) ; born in 
Sandgate, Vt., February 15, 1800; the family settling early in Marietta, Ohio, 
he prepared there for college; graduated at Ohio University, 1825; took the 
full course in this Seminary, 1825-28; licensed to preach by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Rev. Freegrace Raynolds, Wilmington, April 22, 1828. 
He was ordained by the Presbytery of Newburyport, September 25, 1828, as 
home missionary, and went immediately to Southern Ohio ; was at Hamilton 
until 1832; pastor at Berlin, 1832-37; agent of the American Bible Society, 
1837-39, and of the Western Education Society, 1839-40 ; pastor (Presbyterian) 
at Hebron, 1840-46, and at Scipio, 1846-50; acting pastor of Congregational 
church, Bennington, N. H., 1850-53, and at Westbrook, Me., 1853-54; pastor, 
Poultney, Vt., 1855-59, and at Lowell, Ohio, 1864-68, preaching also at Rain- 
bow. He resided, without charge, at Lowell until 1875, an d afterwards with 
his children in the suburbs of Cincinnati and at Columbus. From 1870 he was 
totally blind. 

Rev. Dr. Washington Gladden, his pastor at Columbus, writes : " During 
the long years of his blindness the inner light was never dimmed. His mind 
was always wakeful ; he found the keenest pleasure in the studies which he had 
always followed, and the new phases of thought were familiar to him. Far 
from being distressed at the changes in theology, he hailed them with exulta- 
tion, as new light breaking forth from God's Holy Word. And all the while his 
Christian faith grew firmer and stronger, and his love for his Master more ten- 
der and more pure. Dark as were the paths of his feet, the highway of his 
soul was one that shone more and more unto the perfect day." 

He was married, September 28, 1828, to Susan Gale, of Pembroke, N. H., 
daughter of Joseph Gale and Susannah Frye. She died July 9, 1845, anc * he 
married, second, August 24, 1846, Ann Elizabeth Clark, of Concord, N. H., 
daughter of George Lewis Clark and Charlotte Matilda Turner. She died 
July 31, 1887. Of two sons and four daughters, two daughters alone survive 
him. A son, Capt. Edward Payson Ransom, was an officer in the Union Army. 

Mr. Ransom died of old age, at Columbus, Ohio, January 8, 1S89, in his 
eighty- ninth year. 

CLASS OF 1834. 

Frederic West Holland. (Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Holland and Sarah May ; born in Boston, Mass., June 22, 181 1 ; 
prepared for college at Boston Latin School ; graduated at Harvard College, 
1831 ; studied in this Seminary, 1831-32, and completed his theological course 
in Harvard Divinity School, graduating in 1834; preached in Oswego, N.Y., 
1835; Greenfield, Mass., 1836-37; Philadelphia, 1837; ordained pastor of First 
Unitarian Church in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 11, 1838, and remained there until 
1842 ; pastor of First Unitarian Society, Rochester, N. Y., 1843-47 ; secretary 
of American Unitarian Association, 1848-50 ; traveling in Europe and the East, 
1850-51 ; pastor at East Cambridge, Mass., 1851-59; Neponset, 1859-62 ; North 
Cambridge, 1S62-65; Rochester, N. Y., 1865-68; Rutland, Vt., and New Or- 
leans, La., 1868-69 5 without charge at Cambridge, but often preaching, 1869-71 ; 



143 

pastor, Newburgh, N. Y., 1871-77; resided at Cambridge, 1878-84, and after- 
wards at Concord. He was chaplain of the Middlesex County Jail at East Cam- 
bridge, 1856-59, and of the almshouse at North Cambridge sixteen years, from 
1878 to the fall preceding his death. 

Mr. Holland was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society, and his addresses at the society's memorial meeting in honor of Edward 
Everett and its Tercentenary Celebration of the Birth of Shakespeare were pub- 
lished, as also Scenes in Palestine. Rev. A. P. Putnam, D.D., of Concord, says 
of him in the Christian Register: "Among all our Unitarian missionaries, his 
decided ability and large attainments, his high Christian character and his ex- 
traordinary zeal as a preacher and a worker, and the very long and uninterrupted 
term of his active service entitle him to be regarded as first and foremost. . . . 
Many are those, on earth and in heaven, who gratefully recall the hour when 
they received from him their first impetus to the better life ; and it is not easy 
to estimate the vast amount of good which he accomplished in the wide field 
that witnessed to his varied, protracted, and untiring devotion to the higher 
interests of souls under his care." 

Mr. Holland was married, February 1, 1835, to Harriet Newcomb, of Keene, 
N. H., daughter of Judge Daniel Newcomb and Hannah (Uawes) Goldthwait. 
She survives him, with three sons — all graduates of Harvard College — and 
one daughter. Two sons and two daughters have died, one of the latter three 
days before her father. 

Mr. Holland died of old age, at Concord, Mass., March 26, 1895, m tne 
eighty-fourth year of his age. 



CLASS OP 1835. 

Calvin Emmons Park. 

Son of Rev. Calvin Park, D.D., and Abigail Ware (and brother of Prof. 
Edwards A. Park, of Andover) ; born in Providence, R. I., December 30, 181 1 ; 
prepared for college under the tuition of his father, then professor in Brown 
University ; studied one year in Brown University, and graduated at Amherst 
College, 1831 ; was principal of the Classical School of Weymouth and Brain- 
tree, 1831-32 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1832-35 ; licensed to preach 
by the Woburn Association, April 22, 1835 ; tutor in Amherst College, 1835-37. 
He was ordained as pastor of the church at Waterville, Me., October 31, 1838, 
and remained such until 1844, being also instructor in rhetoric in Waterville 
College (now Colby University), 1839-43; was acting pastor at North Andover, 
Mass., 1844-45, an d pastor at West Boxford, Mass., 1846-59. He continued to 
reside at West Boxford afterwards, carrying on a private school for young men 
until 1 88 1. 

Mr. Park was a thorough scholar and careful writer, and contributed many 
articles and literary reviews to the Bibliotheca Sacra. Rev. Prof. William S. 
Tyler, D.D., LL.D. (Class of 1836), of Amherst College, sends this tribute: 
" Mr. Park was an exemplary student, a superior scholar, esteemed by faculty 
and students, excelling especially in the humanities and belles-lettres, and gradu- 
ating with distinction in the Class of 1831, the largest class that was graduated 
in the first half-century of the history of the college. As tutor in 1835-37, he 
taught the Class of 1839 (the class of Bishop Huntington and Dr. Storrs) the 



144 

Greek and Latin classics with a degree of taste and general knowledge and 
culture which they highly appreciated. At the same time he was a licensed 
preacher, wrote sermons of uncommon beauty and excellence, and supplied 
pulpits in the vicinity of Amherst, much to the satisfaction of his cultivated 
hearers. But I love to think of him especially as one of that rare group of 
choice and congenial spirits — two professors and three tutors — who, in 1836-37, 
were gathered around the table of Professor Snell, and who remained almost 
daily after dinner or supper for • the feast of reason and the flow of soul.' We 
were all Christians of a cheerful type, and were all fond of sacred music; and 
we could always sing from the heart and from our own happy experience : 

The fellowship of kindred minds 
Is like to that above." 

Mr. Park was married, November 5, 1839, to Harriet Turner Pope, of Port- 
land, Me., daughter of Joseph Pope, Esq., and Caroline McLellan. She sur- 
vives him, with two sons — one of whom is Rev. Charles W. Park, of the Class 
of 1870, formerly a missionary in India, now pastor in Birmingham, Ct. — and 
two daughters, their oldest child having died in infancy. 

Mr. Park died of influenza, at West Boxford, Mass., March 4, 1895, a g e d 
eighty- three years. 



CLASS OF 1836. 

Eli Whitney Harrington. 

Son of Nathaniel Harrington and Nancy Townsend ; born in New Brain- 
tree, Mass., November 28, 1804; worked on his father's farm until twenty-three 
years of age, teaching school in the winter season ; while attending school at 
Westminster became interested in active religious work, and determined to fit 
for the ministry ; prepared for college at Amherst Academy ; graduated at Am- 
herst College, 1833; took the full course in this Seminary, 1833-36; was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson 
at Andover, April 5, 1836; went at once from the Seminary to Lunenburg, 
Mass., and was ordained over the church there, April 26, 1837. He remained 
there until 1847; supplied the church at Mason Centre, N. H., 1847-50; was 
pastor at Rochester, Mass., 1850-58; was acting pastor at North Beverly, Mass., 
1859-66, remaining there without charge, although often preaching, 1866-84; 
afterwards resided at Pepperell, Mass., occasionally preaching, and attending 
religious services up to the last Sabbath of his life. 

Mr. Harrington, although a quiet, unostentatious man, excelled many 
others of greater reputation as a clear, effective preacher. An Essex County 
layman writes: "As a speaker, he enunciated distinctly, to the delight of 
elderly people who went to hear him, not only on that account, but because, 
also, he had something to say. As a pastor, his people had his fullest sympa- 
thies at all times. His manliness was beyond question ; his convictions, strong 
and clear, were fearlessly uttered ; he was careful, studious, upright, and always 
in touch with his Master and with mankind." Mr. Harrington was a good man 
and delighted to do good, not simply as a preacher and pastor, but before he 
became a pastor and after he ceased to be one. His college classmate, Rev. 



145 

George C. Partridge (Class of 1838), whose obituary was in the Necrology of 
last year, in writing two years ago of his early life, said: " Eli Harrington was 
older than I, and saw that I was making shipwreck of my Christian belief and 
came to my room one Saturday night and gave me a very plain talk; that 
changed the current and saved me from losing my faith." Having no children, 
he left most of his property for the support of home and foreign missions. 

Mr. Harrington was married, May 17, 1837, to Maria Dickinson, of Am- 
herst, Mass., daughter of Roswell Dickinson and Rachel Hurd. She died 
August 29, 1838, and he married, second, October 17, 1839, Nancy Stiles, of 
Pepperell, Mass., daughter of Isaac Stiles and Nancy Chase. She died 
March 19, 1882. 

He died of old age, at Pepperell, Mass., February 23, 1895, aged ninety 
years. 

Walter Raleigh Long. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Col. Edward Long and Prudence Wells ; born in Cambridge, N. Y., 
January 16, 181 1; prepared for college at Washington Academy, Cambridge; 
graduated at Union College, 1831 ; studied in this Seminary, 1833-34, in Prince- 
ton Seminary, 1834-36, and as resident licentiate in Yale Divinity School, 1836- 
37 ; licensed to preach by the Troy (N. Y.) Presbytery, August 24, 1836; preached 
at Woodbridge, Ct., 1837-39. He was ordained at Lansingburgh, N. Y., by the 
Troy Presbytery, August 28. 1839, and was acting pastor at West Troy, N. Y., 
1841-42; pastor of Fourth Presbyterian Church, Troy, N. Y., 1842-44; at 
Whitesboro, N. Y., 1844-50; acting pastor of Pine Street Presbyterian Church, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1851-52; pastor of Congregational church at Mystic Bridge, 
Ct., 1853-63; acting pastor at Montville, Ct, 1863-65; agent of American 
Freedmen's Union Commission, 1865-68, and of the Presbyterian Committee 
on Freedmen, 1868-70; agent of American Bible Society in New York State, 
1870-75, and district superintendent for West Virginia, 1876-86; traveled in the 
East, 1887-88; afterwards resided at Richmond Hill, N. Y., without charge, 
but often preaching, lecturing, and taking part in religious meetings. 

He published a sermon on Our Goodly Heritage, delivered at St. Louis in 
1852, and numerous letters of travel in the newspapers. In a reminiscent letter 
written last year to the Secretary he said : " The crowning year of my theolog- 
ical study was at Andover in 1833 and 1834, over sixty years ago. I resolved 
neither to rust out nor wear out, but to burn out. I ministered to the church at 
Salem, N. H., one year, by consent of the Faculty, preaching two sermons 
every Sunday and superintending the Sunday school, without charge. My 
athletic ground was a stretch of ten miles to Salem and back on foot ; my 
gymnasium was the ' Andover workshop.' I preached my eighty-third birthday 
sermon last January, from Psalm xc : 10. I am living on my second period of 
1 borrowed time ' with scarcely any labor or sorrow. I am nearing the border- 
land ; I shall soon be cut off and fly away. ' For me to live is Christ, and to 
die is gain.'" An article in the New York Evangelist said of him: "This 
characteristic of intense activity and persistent effort was manifested throughout 
his entire ministry, and proved to be the secret of his unusual success in his late 
work with the American Bible Society. ... He made a personal canvass of the 
whole State [of West Virginia], penetrating on horseback to the most remote 



146 

mountain districts and among the poorest and most ignorant class of people. 
His exposure and hardships in winter were frequently very great, but he re- 
fused to give up the work until every family in the State had been supplied 
with a Bible." 

He was married, September 13, 1842, to Harriet Malinda Pratt, of Meriden, 
Ct, daughter of Hon. Julius Pratt and Lydia De Wolfe. She died July 2, 1850 ; 
and he married, second, June 7, 1854, Elizabeth Huntington, of Lebanon, Ct., 
daughter of Simeon Huntington and Eliza Jones. She died March 31, 1874. 
He had four sons and one daughter, one son and one daughter dying in 
infancy. 

He died of pneumonia, in New York City, January 5, 1895, lacking eleven 
days of being eighty-four years old. 



John Milton Mackie. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dr. Peter Mackie and Fanny Nye ; born in Wareham, Mass., 
December 19, 1813 ; fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; grad- 
uated at Brown University, 1832; studied in this Seminary, 1833-34; tutor 
in Brown University, 1834-35; afterwards studied in the Universities of 
Heidelberg and Leipsic, Germany; returning to this country devoted himself 
to literature, residing in New York City until 1859, afterwards at Great 
Barrington, Mass., where he became a successful agriculturist. He was 
widely known for his interest in the importation and raising of Jersey cattle, 
and was one of the founders of the American Jersey Cattle Club. 

Among his publications were the Life of Leibnitz ; Life of Samuel Gorton 
(in Sparks's American Biographies) ; Cosas de Esp&na ; Life of Schamyl, the 
Circassian Chief ; Life of Tai-Ping- Wang, Chief of the Chinese Insurrection ; 
and Cape Cod to Dixie. He also contributed important articles to the North 
American Review, American Whig Review, and other magazines. 

He married, January 27, 1859, Estella Ives, of Great Barrington, Mass., 
daughter of Col. David Ives and Pamelia Bushnell, who survives him, with one 
son, a counselor at law in New York City, a son having died in infancy. 

Mr. Mackie died of paralysis, at Great Barrington, Mass., July 27, 1894, 
in the eighty-first year of his age. 



GLASS OF 1837. 

Hiram Carleton, D.D. 

Son of Jeremiah Carleton and Deborah Edwards; born in Barre, Vt., 
July 18, 181 1 ; prepared for college under Rev. Justus W. French, minister 
irre (Class of 1S21), and Jonathan C. Southmayd (Class of 1822), at 
ington County Grammar School, Montpelier; graduated at Middlebury 
College, 1833; took the full course in this Seminary; licensed to preach by 
the Andover Association, meeting with Prof. Ralph Emerson, D.D., at 
Andover, April II, 1837. He was ordained pastor of the church at Stowe, 
Yt., January 4, 1838, and remained there until 1852. He was acting pastor 
at West Barnstable, Mass., 1852-62; preached at Stoneham, Mass., 1862-63 



147 

(residing at Greenwood) ; at Fairmount (now Hyde Park), 1862-64, the church 
there being organized in 1863. He was ordained deacon in the Episcopal 
Church, March 6, 1866, and priest, February 15, 1867. He was rector of the 
church at Wood's Holl, Mass., from 1866 to 1881, afterwards residing with 
his son on a farm at East Sandwich, Mass. 

Mr. Carleton was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. He published in 1875 a Treatise on the Meaning of the Derivatives 
of the Greek Root baty, for which he received, among other commendations, a 
complimentary note from Mr. Gladstone. He wrote, but did not publish, 
a commentary on a portion of John's Gospel, and spent much labor on a 
family genealogy, a part of which was published in England. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Trinity College in 1878. Rev. Dr. A. H. 
Quint (Class of 1852) writes of him: "I became acquainted with Mr. Carleton 
before he entered the Episcopal Church, and our acquaintance soon ripened into 
friendship. During much of his ministry at Wood's Holl I was living in New 
Bedford, and he was often in my home and always welcome. He was bright in 
conversation, an extensive reader, and keen in argument. He was gentle, kindly, 
and courteous, simple and sincere. He was an exceptionally fine scholar, but 
particularly eminent in Greek. He was a modest man, and I think that his real 
worth was perhaps best known only to a limited number." 

Dr. Carleton was married, May 24, 1838, to Mary Jane Fisher, of Frances- 
town, N. H., daughter of John Fisher and Lucy Turner. She survives him, 
with one son. 

Dr. Carleton died of paralysis, at East Sandwich, Mass., August 9, 1893, 
aged eighty- two years. 



John Lord, LL.D. 

Son of John Perkins Lord and Sophia Ladd ; born in Portsmouth, N. H., 
December 27, 1810; prepared for college at Berwick (Me.) Academy; gradu- 
ated at Dartmouth College, 1833; took the full course in this Seminary, 1833-34, 
and 1835-37, teaching in the intervening year at Windham and Norwich, Ct.; 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Prof. Ralph 
Emerson, D.D., Andover, April 11, 1837; served for nearly two years as agent 
of the American Peace Society, and in 1839-40 preached for a short time suc- 
cessively at New Marlborough and West Stockbridge, Mass. He then began 
his remarkable career as a lecturer on history, lecturing for two years in this 
country, and three years, 1843-46, in Great Britain, France, and Germany. Re- 
turning to the United States, he devoted his life to lecturing, visiting not only 
the colleges and schools, but all the larger cities of the land. He was lecturer 
on History at Dartmouth College from 1869 to 1876. He published at various 
times works of history : Modern Europe ; The United States ; The Old Roman 
World; Ancient States and Empires ; Ancient History for Schools and Colleges; 
Points of History. The last ten years of his life were spent in rewriting his 
works and lectures in a series of nine volumes, the Beacon Lights of History, 
the last volume, American Statesmen, being issued about a month before his 
death. He left manuscripts on Men of Letters of the Nineteenth Century and 
Reminiscences of Fifty Years in the Lecture Field. He received the degree 



148 

of Doctor of Laws from the University of the City of New York in 1864. He 
had resided for many years in Stamford, Ct. 

Rev. Dr. A. S. Twombly (Class of 1858) writes of him in the Independent : 
" For fifty years Dr. Lord was among the most popular and gifted lecturers in 
the land. He made little pretension to original research, but assimilating a vast 
amount of knowledge shaped it to meet the needs of the people. With an un- 
usual power of satire, he never dipped his pen in gall to wound, and so pure and 
elevating was his thought that not a single line or sentiment could he desire to 
blot from his works. He was always a defender of the faith, a stanch patriot, 
and a faithful friend. He lived to see the grand work achieved, and went to 
sleep at last in conscious peace and hope." 

Dr. Lord was married, May 30, 1846, to Mary Porter, of London, Eng. 
She died in i860, and he married, second, Louisa Tucker, who died in 
October, 1866. He had a son and a daughter ; the son died several years 
ago. 

Dr. Lord died of old age, at Stamford, Ct., December 15, 1894, lacking 
twelve days of being eighty-four years old. 



GLASS OP 1838. 

Aaron Merrick Colton. 

Son of Deacon Walter Colton and Thankful Cobb ; born in Georgia, Vt., 
August 25, 1809 ; prepared for college in the academy at Georgia and the 
Franklin County Grammar School at St. Albans ; graduated at Yale College, 
1835 ; entered this Seminary in 1835, and graduated in 1838, spending, how- 
ever, a few months of 1837-38 in Union Seminary ; his graduation piece, " Bold- 
ness in the Preacher," was published in the Biblical Repository ; licensed to 
preach by the Fairfield Association, at Stamford, Ct., May 30, 1838 ; remained 
at Andover as Abbot Resident, 1839-40; ordained pastor of the First Church in 
Amherst, Mass., June 10, 1840, and remained there until 1852; installed pastor 
of the First Church, Easthampton, Mass., March 2, 1853, and served twenty- 
seven years, being made pastor emeritus in 1880, and continuing his residence 
there. 

Mr. Colton published a Memorial of Dea. Walter Colton (his father), Me- 
morial of Dr. Gordon Hall, The Old Meeting House and Vacation Papers, be- 
sides a sermon at the close of the war and several funeral discourses. He was 
a trustee of Williston Seminary twenty- six years. In addition to the ordinary 
pastoral ministrations he exerted by his unique sermons and his kindly person- 
ality a marked influence over thousands of students of Amherst College and 
Williston Seminary. Rev. Sumner G. Wood (Class of 1880), pastor of the church 
at Easthampton so long ministered to by Mr. Colton, writes of him: "Mr. 
Colton was an able minister, a wise, devoted, and deeply loved pastor. He held 
the pen of a ready writer, and many were the people, the places, the occasions, 
that laid tribute upon his tactful genius to adorn their assemblies. His poetical 
taste, the terseness and picturesqueness of his style, his playful humor, his 
directness and power as a preacher of Jesus Christ and Him crucified, those 
who knew him will never forget. His pastorates were blessed with remarkable 
success. He came to Easthampton when the church he was called to serve 



149 

was almost threatened with extinction. He saw it grow into a strong, vigor- 
ous life. He was a wise master builder in the kingdom of God, and a blessing 
to the whole community for years after his active ministry was ended. His old 
age was that of ripened sainthood, cheery, sympathetic, full of joy in the Lord, 
and Christian stimulus to his friends. Everybody loved him, not only as a 
minister, but as a true, good man, whose prime was full of power, and whose 
age was rich in the gathered fruits of Christian grace." 

Mr. Colton was married, July 15, 1840, to Zeruiah Elizabeth Gould, of An- 
dover, daughter of Deacon Abraham J. Gould and Zeruiah Griffin. She died 
January 8, 1858. He married, second, November 2, 1859, Sarah Ann Bogue, 
of St. Albans, Vt., daughter of Decius Robinson Bogue and Sarah Hatch. She 
survives him, with two sons and three daughters. One child died in infancy. 

Mr. Colton died of heart failure, at Easthampton, Mass., April 30, 1895, 
in his eighty- sixth year. 

Charles Wilkes Wood. 

Son of Judge Wilkes Wood and Betsey Wild Thompson ; born in Middle- 
boro, Mass., June 30, 1814; prepared for college at Plainfield (Ct.) Academy, 
and Pierce Academy, Middleboro ; graduated at Brown University, 1834; taught 
in Rochester and Wareham, Mass., and in Pierce Academy, 1834-35 ; took the 
regular course in this Seminary, 1835-38, and an additional year in the Advanced 
Class, 1838-39. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 10, 1838, and ordained pastor of 
the church in Ashby, Mass., October 30, 1839. He remained there until 1858, 
being for one year, 1846-47, agent, also, of the American Sunday School Union. 
He was then pastor in Campello in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), Mass., 
until 1872; acting pastor at Lakeville, Mass., 1873-77; in Scotland Parish, 
Bridgewater, Mass., 1878-88. He resided afterwards in Middleboro, Mass., 
without charge. 

Mr. Wood represented Ashby in the Legislature in 1847, ar) d was superin- 
tendent of schools in North Bridgewater for two years. His only publications 
were a funeral sermon preached in Ashby and a historical sermon concerning 
the Scotland Church in Bridgewater, 1888. At the time of his death he was at 
work on a town history of Middleboro. Rev. Samuel H. Emery, D.D., of 
Taunton (Class of 1837), writes: "Brother Wood was highly esteemed in all 
this region as an eminently good man. He was such a bishop as Paul de- 
scribes. He honored his profession and his Master. His memory is blessed." 
The following is quoted from a notice in the Middleboro Gazette: "Every one 
knew him and respected him and loved him. He was a good representative of 
the old-school Christian gentleman, and at the same time in full sympathy with 
the life of today. He embodied the strong points of both eras. Naturally 
conservative of all past good, he was yet progressive in spirit, ready to receive 
new truth from whatever source it came. Two notable addresses are recalled 
in illustration of his felicitous power on public occasions — one at the Com- 
mencement of Brown University in 1884, in behalf of his class, the other his 
exceedingly interesting speech at the two hundredth anniversary of the First 
Congregational Church last year." 

Mr. Wood was married, September 20, 1841, to Eliza Ann Adams Bigelow, 



150 

of Rochester, Mass., daughter of Rev. Jonathan Bigelow and Eliza Tappan. 
She died May 24, 1846. He married, second, July 27, 1847, Mrs. Catherine 
Susan Lemist, of Gilmanton, N. H., daughter of Jonathan Clarke and Charlotte 
Johnston, and widow of Capt. Stephen Lemist, of Dorchester, Mass. She sur- 
vives him, with two sons and two daughters. 

Mr. Wood died of old age, at Middleboro, Mass., March 3, 1895, in tne 
eighty-first year of his age. 



CLASS OF 1839. 

Timothy Green Brainerd. 

Son of Joseph Spencer Brainerd and Hannah Hungerford ; born in Troy, 
N. Y., January 24, 1808; prepared for college at St. Albans (Vt.) Academy; 
entered Middlebury College in 1826, afterwards joining the junior class of 
Yale College and graduating there in 1830; taught select school in Wethers- 
field, Ct., and was private tutor in the family of Hon. Samuel A. Law, Meredith, 
N. Y., also pursuing the study of law under the instruction of Hon. Martin 
Welles, Wethersfield, Hon. Eliphalet A. Bulkley, East Haddam, Ct., and Mr. 
Meredith ; preceptor of Randolph (Vt.) Academy, 1832-36 ; took the full course 
in this Seminary, 1836-39; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Prof. Ralph Emerson, D.D., Andover, April 2, 1839. Beginning 
the supply of the Presbyterian church in Londonderry, N. H., in June, 1840, he 
was ordained its pastor November 5, 1840, and remained there until 1855. He 
was then pastor of the Congregational church in Halifax, Mass., for ten years, 
and removed in 1866 to Grinnell, Iowa, carrying on a farm for three years and 
afterwards residing in the city. 

He was superintendent of schools during his entire pastorate in London- 
derry and for several years at Halifax, being also a trustee of Pinkerton 
Academy at Derry, N. H. He represented Halifax in the Legislature in the 
years 1865 and 1866. He was known as an outspoken advocate in the pulpit of 
the anti-slavery reform and, when the time came, of the war for the Union. At 
Grinnell he was repeatedly one of the Examining Committee of Iowa College. 

Ex- President George F. Magoun, D.D. (Class of 1844), writes of him: 
" Mr. Brainerd was a man of unusually clear, penetrating, and discriminating 
mind. What he knew was known with exactness, and used with the firmness 
and thoroughness begotten of such knowledge. As a man of affairs he acted 
with precision. His lifelong and scholarly study of the Greek Testament and 
his definite and strong religious views were characteristic. He could not be 
anything less than an ardent patriot, an unswerving reformer in respect to 
intemperance and slavery, a loyal and eager believer in the evangelical faith. 
To the last he followed the political interests of the nation, the fortunes of 
prohibition, the criticism affecting the doctrines of orthodoxy, with lively 
interest and the deepest solicitude. In his conversation, and especially in 
his prayers, his familiarity with and apt use of ' the words the Holy Ghost 
teacheth ' were exceptional. Very venerable, and honored in simple ways 
in keeping with his marked character, was his presence in all the circles in 
which he moved." 

Mr. Brainerd was married, September 6, 1841, to Harriet Poor Cilley, of 



i5i 

Nottingham, N. H., daughter of Maj. Jacob Cilley and Harriet Poor. She 
died September 23, 1848; and he married, second, September 2, 1851, Lucinda 
Rebecca Dewey, of Hanover, N. H., daughter of Elias Dewey and Mary 
Newell. She died March 25, 1877. Two sons and one daughter died in 
childhood. Three daughters and two sons— graduates, respectively, of 
Dartmouth and Iowa Colleges — are living. 

Mr. Brainerd died of old age, at Grinnell, Iowa, May 25, 1894, aged 
eighty-six years. 

CLASS OF 1841. 

Whitman Peck. 

Son of Samuel Peck and Mary Mead; born in Greenwich, Ct., May 16, 
1815; prepared for college at Greenwich Academy; graduated at Yale College, 
1838; studied in Union Theological Seminary, 1838-40, and graduated from 
this Seminary in 1841 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting 
with Rev. S. C. Jackson at Andover, April 13, 1841. He preached at Erving, 
Mass., 1841-42, and at Gustavus, Ohio, 1842-43; was ordained by the Cayuga 
Presbytery as pastor at Genoa, N. Y., October 23, 1844, and remained there until 
1849; was acting pastor at Auburn, Mass., 1849-50, and at North Branford,Ct., 
1851—55. The failure of his health forbidding further pastoral service, he en- 
gaged in teaching: at North Greenwich, Ct., 1856-58; Newark, Del., 1859-61; 
Ridgefield, Ct., 1862-64; Fishkill, N. Y., 1865-68; New Haven, Ct., 1868-74; 
continued to reside there until 1884, serving as city missionary for a time ; from 
1884 at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

He published a book of Latin Lessons (subsequently incorporated in 
Andrews's Latin Lessons ) ; Practical Business Arithmetic ; Manual of Chris- 
tian Faith. Rev. James W. Hubbell, of Mansfield, Ohio (Class of 1863), 
sends the following: "During my pastorate at the College Street Church, 
New Haven, Mr. Peck was one of my most faithful and helpful members. 
He had retired from the active ministry and was engaged in teaching, for 
which his fine scholarship and experience admirably adapted him. He was 
a conspicuous example of a Christian minister, who had grace enough to be 
an active lay member of the church without caring for clerical rights or 
titles. He could act as deacon, as Bible class teacher or scholar, or sit 
quietly in some vacant place, as occasion seemed to require. He was a 
faithful Bible student, conservative in his theological views, intelligent and 
firm in his adherence to what he believed to be truth, and yet open always 
to the light. Conscientious, charitable in word and deed, kind to every- 
body, hopeful of the future, his long life was a grateful benediction to many, 
and his memory, along with that of his sainted wife, will be in sweet 
remembrance for many a year." 

Mr. Peck was married, November 6, 1844, to Ruth Maria Keeler, of 
Ridgefield, Ct., daughter of Harvey Keeler and Mary Mead. She died 
January 30, 1881. One daughter is the wife of Rev. Prof. A. E. Todd, of 
Berea College, and another of Rev. Wayland Spaulding, of Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. The youngest daughter died in 1870, and the only son in 1883, soon 
after receiving ordination in the Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Peck died of heart failure, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., November 9, 1894, 
in the eightieth year of his age. 



152 
GLASS OF 1842. 

Anson Hall Parmelee. 

Son of Asaph Parmelee and Hannah Hall ; born in Bristol, Vt., Septem- 
ber 14, 1S10; prepared for college at Burr Seminary, Manchester, Vt. ; grad- 
uated at Middlebury College, 1839; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1839-42 ; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 12, 1842; was general agent of the 
American Tract Society in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, 
1S42-45; was ordained pastor of the Presbyterian church in Addison, N. Y., 
October 21, 1846, having commenced there in 1845 and continuing until 1855; 
pastor at Livonia, N. Y., 1855-69; at Seneca Castle, N. Y., 1869-74, residing 
afterwards on a farm in the neighboring town of Phelps. 

Rev. Edward P. Blodgett, his Seminary classmate, now of Roslindale, 
Mass., writes: "My remembrance of Brother Parmelee is very fresh and 
fragrant, though it is over fifty years since we were brought into close fel- 
lowship as room-mates at Andover. He was a dear man, a true and faith- 
ful disciple of the divine Master, and gave much promise of being ' a 
workman that needeth not to be ashamed ' — a promise which I have no 
reason to doubt was fulfilled, though I have known very little of him since 
we left the Seminary." Rev. S. \V. Pratt, of Campbell, N. Y., writes: 
" He was the pastor of my youth, and won my confidence and affection. 
He was a faithful pastor, a good preacher, a good business man, a good 
Sunday school man. He led many young men to enter the ministry. He 
kept himself informed of what was going on in the world, and his Chris- 
tianity was above his churchianity. His old age was serene and beautiful." 

He was married, October 4, 1843, to Mary Elizabeth Whiting, of Big Flat, 
X. Y., daughter of Rev. Francis Lane Whiting and Mary Kidder. She died 
August 5, 1857 ; and he married, second, January 3, i860, Lycintha Martin, of 
Rochester, N. Y., daughter of John Martin and Sarah Garber. She survives 
him. Of three sons and two daughters, two sons died in infancy. 

Mr. Parmelee died of Bright's disease, in Phelps, N. Y., August 28, 1894, 
in the eighty-fourth year of his age. 

Lathrop Taylor. 

Son of Barnabas Taylor and Hannah Billington ; born in Buckland, Mass., 
August 3, 1813; prepared for college at Burr Seminary, Manchester, Vt. ; grad- 
uated at Middlebury College, 1839; studied in this Seminary, 1839-42, being a 
room-mate for the entire course of Rev. Luther H. Sheldon, late of Andover, 
a tribute to whose memory he wrote in the Necrology of last year. He was 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Dr. Edwards, 
Andover, April 12, 1842; and after supplying for one year the Winslow (then 
the Spring Street) Church, Taunton, Mass., he was ordained its pastor, May 16, 
1843, and remained there two years. His subsequent pastorates were : Spring- 
field, Vt., 1845-51 ; Francestown, N. H., 1851-57 ; Bloomington, 111., 1857-61 ; 
Madison, Wis., 1861-64; Farmington, 111., 1864-75; Wheaton, 111., 1875-80; 
Peru, 111, 1880-83; Rutland, 111., 1883-86; Gridley, 111., 1886-88; afterwards 
without pastoral charge, but often supplying vacant churches, at Rutland, 
Wcnona, and Wheaton, 111. 



153 

Mr. Taylor was a member of the Bristol County Historical Society while 
at Taunton, a trustee of the academy and superintendent of schools when at 
Francestown, a trustee of Wheaton College when in Illinois, and a member of 
the first board of directors of the Illinois Home Missionary Society, with the 
work of which he was closely connected from the beginning. He published a 
sermon on Native Depravity, a sermon at the dedication of the college chapel 
at Wheaton in 1873, and the Moral Picture Book. His classmate, Rev. Dr. S. 
C. Bartlett, who preached his installation sermon at Bloomington in 1857, writes 
of him: "He was a frank, earnest, active, faithful man." Prof. F. W. Fisk, 
D.D., of Chicago, says: "He made the cause of the downtrodden and op- 
pressed his own, and toiled for their good as if they were his own brethren 
in the flesh. He seemed to act ever on the principle that whatever concerns 
humanity concerned him. He lived to do good, not only to those around him, 
but also to the human race wherever found. This, he believed, could be only 
effected through the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ." 

He was married, October 10, 1843, to Hannah Tucker Hall, of Chelsea 
(now Revere), Mass., daughter of Maj. Zechariah Hall and Hannah Tucker. 
She died December 5, 1854; and he married, second, December 18, 1855, 
Lucinda Baxter Brickett, of New Ipswich, N. H., daughter of James Brickett 
and Lucy Woods (sister of Dr. Leonard Woods). She survives him, with one 
son and four daughters, two sons and one daughter having deceased. Two 
sons were in the Union Army. 

Mr. Taylor died of pneumonia, at Wheaton, 111., January 25, 1895, at the 
age of eighty- one years. 



GLASS OF 1843. 
William Greenough Thayer Shedd, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Rev. Marshall Shedd and Eliza Thayer; born in Acton, Mass., 
June 21, 1820; prepared for college at the Westport Academy, near his early 
home at Willsborough, N. Y. ; graduated at the University of Vermont, 1839. 
While employed as a tutor in a private family in New York City, the year after 
his graduation, he attended the church of Dr. Asa D. Smith (Class of 1834), 
and under his influence determined to enter the ministry. He took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1840-43 ; was licensed to preach by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson at Andover, April 11, 1843, anc * 
was ordained pastor over the church in Brandon, Vt., January 4, 1844, remain- 
ing there till the autumn of 1845. He was professor of English Literature in 
the University of Vermont, 1845-52; professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral 
Theology in Auburn Theological Seminary, 1852-54; elected Brown professor 
of Ecclesiastical History and lecturer on Pastoral Theology at Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1853, and inaugurated, February 15, 1854, his inaugural dis- 
course on "The Nature and Influence of the Historic Spirit " being published 
in the Bibliotheca Sacra ; remained at Andover until 1862 ; pastor of the Brick 
Presbyterian Church, New York City, 1862-63 ; professor of Sacred Literature, 
Union Theological Seminary, 1863-74, and of Systematic Theology, 1874-90. 

He published Translation of Theremin's Rhetoric ; Discourses and Essays ; 
Lectures on the Philosophy of History ; Translation of Guericke's Church History ; 



154 

Confessions of Augustine (the above published at Andover by W. F. Draper, 
Class of 1S50); Homiletics and Pastoral Theology; Sermons to the Natural 

: Theological Essays ; Literary Essays ; Commentary on Romans ; Sermons 
to the Spiritual Man ; Doctrine of Endless Punishment ; Dogmatic Theology 
(three volumes, the last published in 1890) ; Proposed Revision of the Westmin- 
ster Standards, besides numerous sermons and addresses. He also edited the 
Works of Coleridge and Lange' s Commentary on Mark, and contributed many 
important articles to the Bibliotheca Sacra and other theological reviews. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of Vermont in 
1857, and that of Doctor of Laws from the University of the City of New 
York in 1876. 

Prof. Edwards A. Park, of Andover, writes of his former pupil and col- 
league : " Professor Shedd united a rare degree of modesty with a rare degree 
of genius and learning. He was an industrious reader, but, more than that, he 
was a profound thinker. He had a firm grasp of principles, and was self-con- 
sistent in the conclusions which he derived from them. He was confirmed in 
these conclusions by the great authors whom he studied with signal care. He 
was a close student of John Calvin and still more of St. Augustine. Perhaps 
no American clergyman was more familiar with the writings of Thomas Aquinas. 
It is natural that he should have the courage of his convictions, as he came to 
them after so much protracted and conscientious labor. I have never agreed 
with him in some of his speculations, but have always revered him as a philos- 
opher and a divine. My admiration has risen to a greater height than ever 
during the last years of his life." 

Dr. Shedd was married, October 7, 1845, to Lucy Ann Myers, of White- 
hall, N. V., daughter of Peter Joseph Henry Myers and Lucy Fitch Kirtland. 
She survives him, with two sons and two daughters. The oldest son was edu- 
cated at the College of the City of New York, and the youngest, a counselor 
at law in New York City, at Columbia College. 

Dr. Shedd died of old age, in New York City, November 17, 1894, aged 
seventy-four years. 

CLASS OF 1844. 

John Langdon Dudley. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of John Dudley and Betsey Tirrill ; born in Andover, N. H., January 12, 
181 2; fitted for college at the Teachers' Seminary of Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, and under private instruction of Dr. Thatcher Thayer (Class of 1837), at 
Newport, R. I. ; studied in this Seminary, 1841-42 ; entered Amherst College 
with the Junior. Class, 1842, and graduated, 1844; finished his theological study 
with Dr. Thayer at Newport, and was ordained there, June II, 1847; supplied 
the pulpit of Dr. Thayer during his absence in Europe, 1847-49; was acting 
pastor of the South Church, Middletown, Ct., 1849-54, and settled pastor, 
1854-68; pastor of Plymouth Church, Milwaukee, Wis., 1868-75; subsequently 
supplied Unitarian pulpits in Chicago, Denver, Madison, Wis., and other cities; 
was minister of the Twenty-eighth Congregational Society at the Parker Memo- 
rial Building, Boston, 1878-80; resided in Lake Mills, Wis., without charge, 
from 1880 to 1894, when he removed to St. Augustine, Fla. 

He published Tides and Tendencies, a volume of Sermons, a pamphlet on 



155 

Salvation, and one on Liturgies, while in Milwaukee his sermons were regularly 
published in pamphlet form. A memorial article in the Christian Register said 
of him : "He was a scholar of profound and varied learning. He loved his 
books, and he loved humanity better than it deserves. His studies of the na- 
ture of Christ had made him Christlike. 'Divine philosophy' was his delight 
in other years, and later the poetic impulses and capacities of his nature took 
the lead. He wrote verse lifting up to God and permeated by a holy sentiment 
of ideal love and longing. Modest and unassuming, gentle and gracious, true 
and brave, he deserved more of the world that he lived to serve." 

Mr. Dudley was married, June 6, 1861, to Eliza Maria Coleman, of Phila- 
delphia, daughter of Rev. Lyman Coleman, D.D., and Maria Flynt. She died 
June 3, 187 1, and he married, second, October 23, 1872, Marion Vienna Churchill, 
of Lake Mills, Wis., daughter of James Worthy Churchill and Vienna Thomp- 
son. She survives him. 

Mr. Dudley died of bronchial pneumonia, in Boston, November 21, 1894, 
in the eighty-third year of his age. 



CLASS OF 1845. 

Luther Clapp. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Dea. Ansel Clapp and Eunice Wright; born in Westhampton, 
Mass., October 18, 1819; prepared for college with his uncle, Rev. Ebenezer 
B. Wright, of Chicopee (Class of 1817), and at Hopkins Academy, Hadley; 
graduated at Williams College, 1841 ; taught a select school at Norwich (now 
Huntington), Mass.; studied in this Seminary, 1842-44; principal of Hardwick 
(Vt.) Academy for a short time. He was licensed to preach by the Hampshire 
Association, meeting with Rev. J. H. Bisbee, Worthington, Mass., May 6, 1845, 
and went at once to Wisconsin under commission of the American Home Mis- 
sionary Society. He was ordained at Wauwatosa, Wis., October 5, 1845, an( ^ 
installed pastor there June 29, 1848, remaining in charge of the church unti' 
1873 — nearly twenty- eight years. He was then appointed general missionary 
by the Milwaukee Convention to care for destitute churches, and continued in 
that arduous work eight years ; was acting pastor at Pewaukee, Wis., 1881-84, 
and at Hartland, Wis., 1882-89, having his residence at Hartland during his 
pastorate there, but before and afterwards at Wauwatosa. 

In the early part of Mr. Clapp's pastorate at Wauwatosa he and his wife 
opened a select school in the unfurnished parlor of their house, which was after- 
wards continued for several terms elsewhere. He often gave private instruction, 
also, to the young people of his congregation. He published in 1882 a His- 
torical Discourse at the fortieth anniversary of the Wauwatosa church, and 
ten years later the Semi-Centennial Services of the church. He also prepared 
Sketches of Pioneer Ministers for the Jubilee Memorial of the Congregational 
Convention of Wisconsin in 1890. In connection with Rev. William DeLoss 
Love (Class of 1847), he edited the Wisconsin Puritan at Milwaukee from its 
beginning in 1862 until it was succeeded by the Advance in 1867. 

Dr. Love sends the following tribute : " Luther Clapp was an honest and 
earnest man, a clear and discriminating observer, a judicious, highly evangelical, 
and faithful preacher, a sincere and genial friend and pastor, and a humble, 



i S 6 

prayerful Christian. I do not remember him as ever wrong in any question of 
ethics, morality, or religion ; he had a wonderful faculty for being always right. 
He kept up marvelously his knowledge of the Scriptures in their original 
languages. He maintained intimacy with the thoughts of the present day, 
and was always ready for action at the right time. In his mature years he 
was especially venerated and beloved by his younger brethren in the ministry. 
He and his dear friend, Rev. Enos J. Montague [Class of 1845], were bright 
and shining lights, reflecting the divine glory that came from the higher heaven 
to which they have now both gone." 

Mr. Clapp was married, June 24, 1845, to Harriet Priscilla Stedman, of 
Chicopee, Mass., daughter of Dea. Simeon Stedman and Sally Boardman. 
She survives him, with one son and four daughters, one of whom is the 
wife of Rev. Chauncey Goodrich (Class of 1864), missionary in China; two 
daughters are deceased. 

Mr. Clapp died of anaemia, at Wauwatosa, Wis., June 24, 1894, in the 
seventy-fifth year of his age. 

Jabez Baldwin Lyman, M.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Ahira Lyman and Lydia Baldwin ; born in Easthampton, Mass., 
April 18, 1820; prepared for college at Southampton Academy and Hopkins 
Academy, Hadley; graduated at Amherst College, 1841 ; studied in this 
Seminary, 1842-43; continued theological study in Germany, under Tholuck 
at Halle and Neander at Berlin, until 1846; spent additional time in foreign 
travel and study; returning to this country, was instructor in German and 
French at Amherst College, 1848-49; taught in Abbeville, S. C, 1850-52; 
was professor of Mathematics, Oglethorpe (Ga.) University, 1852-53 ; studied 
medicine in Paris, 1853-56, and in Vienna, 1856-57 ; received degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine from Jefferson Medical College, 1857; practiced medicine 
in Chicago, 111., 1857-58; in Rockford, 111., 1858-81; from 1881 resided in 
Salem, Mass. 

Dr. Baldwin was United States Medical Examiner for Pensions for nearly 
twenty years, and while residing in Salem was a member of the school board. 
He furnished translations of German articles to early volumes of the Bibliotheca 
Sacra, and contributed in later years to medical journals. Rev. F. P. Woodbury, 
D.D., of New York (Class of 1864), writes: " Dr. Lyman was highly esteemed 
both as a Christian and in his professional work in Rockford. He was a man 
of high culture and noble purposes, of kindly disposition, and his scientific 
attainments were of a high order." Rev. De Witt S. Clark, D.D., his pastor at 
Salem (Class of 1868), says: "Dr. Lyman was a man of broad and accurate 
scholarship, keeping abreast of the latest and most useful discoveries in the line 
of his profession, and was recognized as a valuable practitioner and counselor. 
He was quite proficient as a student of German, and developed not a little skill 
as an artist. He was held in high esteem as a citizen and as a Christian man." 

Dr. Lyman married, September 5, i860, Lucy DePue, of Galesburg, 111., 
daughter of Ephraim DePue and Maria Dennis. She survives him, with five 
of their eight children, one of their daughters being the wife of Rev. John R. 
Smith, of the Class of 1892. 

Dr. Lyman died of apoplexy, at Salem, Mass., June 29, 1893, a g ed seventy- 
three years. 



157 
CLASS OF 1846. 

David Torrey, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Maj. Jason Torrey and Achsah Tyler; born in Bethany, Pa., 
November 13, 1818; prepared for college at Honesdale (Pa.) Academy; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1843; studied in this Seminary, 1843-44, 
and finished his course in Union Seminary, 1844-46; was tutor in Amherst 
College, 1846-47, and taught in Honesdale (Pa.) Academy, 1848-49. He 
was ordained over the Presbyterian church at Delhi, N. Y., January 29, 1850, 
his pastorate there extending from 1849 to i860; pastor at Ithaca, N. Y., 
1860-64; at Ann Arbor, Mich., 1866-67; supplied for several months Rev. 
Dr. Patterson's church in Chicago; and after a period of foreign travel was 
settled at Cazenovia, N. Y., in 1869, continuing his pastoral service until 1880, 
and residing there without charge afterwards. t 

He had an honorable and influential place in the counsels of the Presby- 
terian Church, especially in connection with its benevolent and educational 
work. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton College 
in 1863, and was acting professor of Intellectual Philosophy in that institution, 
1882-83. During the war he showed his patriotism not only in the pulpit, but 
by active personal service at the front, under the auspices of the Christian 
Commission. In a memorial address at his funeral, Rev. George B. Spalding, 
D.D. (Class of 1861), said: "His intellectual qualities were of high range, 
his thinking clear and strong, his judgment free from passion and bias, far- 
reaching, springing from principles. . . . His mightiest interest was in human- 
ity, in his fellow men, in the nation's progress, and the Church's growth. He 
was large in his views, expectant of all good things, reverent towards the 
past, but ever hopeful of the future. He looked for new revelations, and 
kept all the doors of his soul wide open to give them hospitable entrance. 
He glorified his ministerial profession, and never regretted that God had 
called him to it. He honored it with every affection and ambition of his 
soul, and sought to make it honorable to all others." 

Dr. Torrey was married, October 3, 1848, to Mary Elizabeth Humphrey, 
of Pittsfield, Mass., daughter of Rev. Dr. Heman Humphrey and Sophia 
Porter. She died April 8, 1867; and ne married, second, August 28, 1873, 
Mrs. Georgiana Wolf Moseley, daughter of Dr. David Mitchell and Sarah 
Coman, and widow of George F. Moseley, who survives him. He had two 
children — Mrs. William D. Wells, of Cazenovia, and James H. Torrey, 
a counselor at law in Scranton, Pa. 

He died of heart failure, at Cazenovia, N. Y., September 29, 1894, in the 
seventy- sixth year of his age. 



CLASS OP 1847. 
Jonathan Edwards. 

Son of Rev. Justin Edwards. D.D. (Class of 1813; pastor of South 
Church, Andover, and president of the Seminary), and Lydia Bigelow; born 
in Andover, Mass., July 17, 1820; graduated from Phillips Academy, Andover, 
1836, and at Yale College, 1840; taught in Lunenburg County, Va., 1840-41, 
in Gorham (Me.) Seminary, 1843-44, and as principal of Cony Academy, 



i 5 8 

Augusta, Me., 1844-45; studied one year in Yale Divinity School, and gradu- 
ated at this Seminary, 1847, remaining as resident licentiate, 1847-48. He was 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. 
Taylor, Andover, April 12, 1847, and ordained pastor of the church in Woburn, 
tember 7, 1848, continuing there until 1856. He was the first pastor 
of the Plymouth Church, Rochester, N. Y., 1856-62 ; pastor of the First 
Church, Dedham, Mass., 1863-74; professor in Colorado College and acting 
pastor of church at Colorado Springs, Col., 1874-75; pastor of the church at 
Grantville (afterwards Wellesley Hills), Mass., from 1876 to his death. 

Seven of his sermons were published, including three historical discourses 
on anniversaries of the Dedham church, and one a memorial discourse of Dr. 
Ebenezer Burgess (Class of 181 5), of Dedham. Of Mr. Edwards's long and 
useful ministry, Rev. Dr. D. L. Furber (Class of 1846) writes : " Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards was a preacher forty-six years, with very brief intervals between one 
pastorate and another. His work ended only with his life, and it was not un- 
common to hear his preaching spoken of in recent years as better than ever. 
He kept abreast of the times, adapted himself gracefully to changed conditions 
in society, retained his youthful feelings, kept his hold upon the young, and 
never seemed like a man belonging to a past generation. But he did not adapt 
himself to changed customs when principle was involved. When it was first 
proposed to run Sunday trains from Dedham to Boston he drew up a remon- 
strance, obtained a large number of signatures, and presented it himself. As a 
pastor, his cheerfulness, which was as unfailing as his politeness, made his visits 
always acceptable. He always felt at home in the ministry, and regarded it as 
his true calling. Its burdens and trials he met with true Christian courage and 
with the faith that casts the burden on the Lord. It is something noteworthy 
in our day when a minister continues his work with unabated vigor, both in 
pulpit and parish, to the age of seventy-four." 

He was married, August 31, 1848, to Frances Swan Bronson, of Augusta, 
Me., daughter of Hon. David Bronson and Augusta C. Robinson Holton. She 
survives him, with one son and two daughters. 

Mr. Edwards died of pneumonia and heart weakness, at Wellesley Hills, 
Mass., July 16, 1894, lacking one day of being seventy- four years old. 



GLASS OF 1850. 

Swift Byington. 

Son of Dr. Charles Byington andEvalina Barnes ; born in Bristol, Ct., Feb- 
ruary 4, 1824; fitted for college under A. Bronson Alcott and in Philadelphia; 
graduated at Yale College, 1847; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1847-49; 
licensed to preach by Middlesex (Ct.) Association, August 7, 1849; graduated 
from this Seminary, 1850, remaining two years longer as resident licentiate; 
ordained pastor of church in West Brookfield, Mass., November 17, 1852, and 
continued there until 1858; preached at North Avenue Church, Cambridge, 
1859; at North Woburn, 1861-62; at the Old South Church, Boston, 1862-63; 
pastor at Stoneham, 1864-71, and at Exeter, N. H., 1871-93. 

Rev. George E. Street (Class of 1863), for twenty-four years closely associ- 
ated with Mr. Byington at Exeter, writes of him : " Mr. Byington was emphatically 



159 

a preacher. This was his aim in the Theological Seminary, where he was the 
life of a Sermon Club, which met to discuss plans of sermons. When he en- 
tered his first pastorate he burned all his sermons lest he should be tempted to 
use them, when as a pastor he ought to write better ones. His pulpit ministry 
in Exeter was a very strong one. He avoided sensational and occasional ser- 
mons, rarely allowing social, political, or ecclesiastical events to suggest the 
theme of his discourses or intrude into them. He was master of a fascinating 
style, clean-cut and vigorous, and he never came into the pulpit without thor- 
ough preparation. The impress of careful thought, sincerity, and strength was 
upon all his work, so that he never failed to interest and instruct. He was very 
felicitous in his prayers, and his reading of the Scriptures and of hymns had a 
peculiar charm. A volume of his sermons ought to be given to the public." 

Mr. Byington was married, September 8, 1852, to Martha Maria Wheeler, 
of Boston, daughter of Deacon Joel Wheeler and Martha W. (Livermore) 
Gibbons. She survives him, with one son and two daughters. A son died 
in infancy and a daughter at the age of twenty-one. 

Mr. Byington died of apoplexy, following four years of feebleness, at 
Exeter, N. H., May 26, 1895, aged seventy-one years. 



CLASS OF 1851. 

Henry Martyn Storrs, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Rev. Charles Backus Storrs (Class of 1820; president of Western 
Reserve College) and Vashti Maria Pierson ; born in Ravenna, Ohio, January 20, 
1827 ; his father dying in 1833, he lived with his uncle, Rev. Dr. Richard S. 
Storrs, D.D., Senior (Class of 1810), at Braintree, and was fitted for college at 
the Classical School of Weymouth and Braintree ; graduated at Amherst College, 
1846; taught in Gordonsville, Va., one year; took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1848-51, and was a resident licentiate at Andover a part of the following 
year; licensed to preach by the Suffolk South Association, April 1, 1851 ; was 
ordained pastor of the Lawrence Street Church, Lawrence, Mass., January 15, 
1852, and remained there three years ; was then pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1855-67, and of the South Church, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1867-72 ; was secretary of the American Home Missionary Society, New 
York, 1872-82, and pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Orange, N. J., 
from 1882 to the time of his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Western Reserve Col- 
lege in 1864, and that of Doctor of Laws from Adelbert College in 1888. He 
was a trustee of Marietta College for over thirty years, and a member of the 
Long Island Historical Society of Brooklyn and of the New England Society 
of Orange. 

In accordance with an agreement made long ago between Dr. Storrs and 
his Seminary classmate and intimate friend, Rev. Nathaniel A. Hyde, D.D., of 
Indianapolis, Ind., that the one longest spared should attend the funeral of the 
other, Dr. Hyde performed that service at Orange, and has also furnished the 
following tribute : "My acquaintance with Dr. Storrs commenced when we met 
at Andover as members of the Class of 185 1. From the first he was recognized 
as a leading member of the class. His erect, stalwart form and manly bearing 



i6o 

made him a commanding figure among his fellow students. His intellectual 
abilities were not less conspicuous. In the classroom and in debates with his 
classmates he exhibited the power of vigorous thinking and utterance which 
distinguished his future career. In his social relations through life he was 
kindly, sprightly, and full of ready humor. He gave lavishly of his affection 
and service to those he loved. He had a high ideal of the preparation needed 
for his chosen calling. His ministry was characterized by an earnest desire and 
persistent effort for spiritual results, and all his pastorates were richly blessed. 
He was never so happy as when he received into the church those whom he had 
won to Christ. For a few years he filled the office of secretary of the Home 
Missionary Society with distinguished ability and devotion to his work. His 
powerful appeals thrilled the assemblies he addressed on home missions, and 
the echo of those eloquent addresses is heard to this day. He was a man of 
strong faith ; he fled to prayer for help in time of need. Immortality and the 
heavenly world were glorious realities to his mind, which were never veiled by 
doubt. His end came just as he wished it might. When we last met he ex- 
pressed the hope that he might fall with the harness on. He worked hard, 
honestly, earnestly, to the last." 

Dr. Storrs was married, March 9, 1852, to Catharine Hitchcock, of Amherst, 
Mass., daughter of Rev. Edward Hitchcock, D.D. (president of Amherst Col- 
lege), and Orra White. She died April 10, 1895. A daughter died in infancy; 
two sons, graduates of Yale College, and one daughter are living. 

Dr. Storrs died of pneumonia, at Orange, N. J., December 1, 1894, in the 
sixty-eighth year of his age. 



GLASS OF 1852. 

Charles Patterson Felch. 

Son of John Felch and Susan Piper Felch; born in Limerick, Me., Au- 
gust 5, 1822; prepared for college partly in Maine and partly while residing 
with his uncle, Governor Felch, at Ann Arbor, Mich. ; graduated at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1849; took the full course in this Seminary, 1849-52; 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. W. T. Briggs, 
North Andover, April 13, 1852; preached at Houlton, Me., 1853-54; ordained 
at Amboy, 111., April 30, 1857, and remained there until 1859; pastor at Napier- 
ville, 111., 1860-64, and of Presbyterian churches at Lacon, 111., 1864-65, and 
Danville, 111., 1866-68 ; resided afterwards in Lacon, Aurora, and Chicago, 111., 
being engaged in the life insurance business. 

Rev. A. H. Quint, D.D., his classmate in the Seminary, writes : "I knew 
my classmate, Mr. Felch, very well, perhaps better than any other one did. He 
was not a rapid thinker, but clear and honest. He always appeared to be an 
earnest and sincere Christian, given more to practical experience than to theo- 
logical discussion. He did not permanently remain in the active ministry, owing 
partly to ill health, but became decidedly successful in his line of business. 
Our regard continued throughout his life, so much so that whenever I went to 
Chicago I called upon him or he upon me. I have a warm place in my memory 
for him." 

Mr. Felch was married, September 23, 1857, to Mrs. Mary Carter Godfrey, 



i6i 

daughter of George Wheelwright and Mary Carter, of Bangor, and widow of 
James Godfrey, Esq., of Houlton, Me. She died January 14, 1892. Their two 
children died in infancy. 

Mr. Felch died of cancer of the stomach, in Chicago, 111., August 1, 1892. 



CLASS OF 1854. 
Elias Brewster Hillard. 

Son of Capt. Moses Hillard and Martha Brewster; born in Preston, Ct., 
September 6, 1825; prepared for college at Bacon Academy, Colchester, Ct. ; 
graduated at Yale College, 1848 ; was principal of Lewis Academy, Southing- 
ton, Ct., 1848-50; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1850-52 (his course being 
interrupted by several months spent in Texas for the recuperation of his health), 
and in this Seminary, 1852-54. He was licensed by the New Haven East As- 
sociation in 1852, and was ordained, March 15, 1855, as pastor of the church in 
Hadlyme, Ct. He remained there until i860, his subsequent pastorates being 
in Kensington, Ct., 1860-67; South Glastonbury, Ct., 1867-69; Plymouth, Ct., 
1869-89; Conway, Mass., 1889-93. He remained in Conway without charge 
until the fall of 1894, when he removed to Farmington, Ct. 

Rev. Dr. Joseph H. Twichell (Class of 1865) writes of Mr. Hillard in the 
Hartford C our ant : "Thirty-eight years in all he exercised the ministry of the 
gospel, and continually with his whole heart, with burning zeal, and the enlist- 
ment of every faculty of his being. When at last he laid down his life work he 
was worn out. Mr. Hillard was a man of a high order of ability, intellectually 
alive and alert, and, in his views, of the liberal, progressive school. Grounded 
and settled in the essentials of Christian faith, he was never in the least afraid 
of new ways of thinking on the old truths. He was characteristically fervid in 
temperament, and was wont to champion with boundless enthusiasm whatever 
cause he felt to be for the public welfare and for the advance of Christ's king- 
dom. He fought a good soldier's fight against all forms of evil that he saw 
working ill to his neighbor. He loved righteousness and he hated iniquity. 
He was the soul of Christian courage, also of Christian kindness and good 
will." 

He was married, September 10, 1855, to Julia Whittlesey, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, daughter of Judge Frederic Whittlesey and Eliza Burrell. She survives 
him, with five daughters and two sons ; one son died in infancy and one at the 
age of nineteen. One daughter was for several years principal of Rockford 
(111.) Female Seminary, and another is principal of St. Margaret's School for 
Girls, Waterbury, Ct. 

Mr. Hillard died of heart failure, following pneumonia, at Farmington, Ct, 
March 1, 1895, in the seventieth year of his age. 

Samuel Dana Hosmer. 

Son of Zelotes Hosmer and Louisa Lawrence; born in Boston, July 26, 
1829; prepared for college at Boston Latin School and (the family removing 
to Cambridge) the Hopkins Classical School; graduated at Harvard College, 
1850; spent the next year in foreign travel in company with his uncle, Rev. 
Edward A. Lawrence (Class of 1838) ; took the full course in this Seminary, 



1 62 

1851-54 ; was licensed to preach, March 7, 1854, by the Suffolk South Associa- 
tion. He preached a few months for Rev. D. R. Cady (Class of 1845) at West- 
boro, Mass., and was in the home missionary service at Alexander and Cooper, 
Me., until December, 1855, when he began pastoral service at Eastport, Me., 
being ordained there November 11, 1856, and remaining until 1861. His sub- 
sequent pastorates were at Nantucket, Mass., 1862-72; South Natick, Mass., 
1873-78; Easton, Mass., 1878-79; Clarendon Hills in Hyde Park, Mass., 
1879-82, his labors there resulting in the organization of a church ; Auburn, 
Mass., 1883-90. From 1890 he resided in Worcester, Mass., often supplying 
vacant pulpits, and for the six months preceding his death ministering to the 
Baptist church in North Grafton. 

Mr. Hosmer was much interested in antiquarian and historical researches, 
and contributed valuable papers to the Worcester Society of Antiquity, of 
which he was an honored member. Besides these he published a centennial 
sermon at Nantucket in 1865 and a historical sermon preached in the John 
Eliot Church, South Natick, in 1874. He prepared sketches of the towns of 
Natick (in connection with Rev. Daniel Wight, Class of 1840) and Auburn for 
county histories. Rev. Charles M. Southgate (Class of 1870), pastor of Pilgrim 
Church, Worcester, which Mr. Hosmer attended, writes of him : " The last 
five gracious years spent in Worcester won him the truest respect and affec- 
tion, as testified by the impressive tributes paid after his death by the Worces- 
ter Central Association, the Ministerial Union of the city, the Pilgrim Church, 
and the Baptist church where he ministered. His intellectual gifts, his noble 
serenity and strength of soul, guileless nature, and living embodiment of our 
Lord's beatitudes were too rare, whether singly or in combination, to be over- 
looked. It would be hard to say whether he was more valued by mature saints 
or by his enthusiastic Sunday school class of young men. He was an ideal 
parishioner, discerning with exquisite tact the exact thing the pastor would wish 
said or done; a faultless church clerk; a blessed visitor among the sick and 
sorrowing." 

Mr. Hosmer was married, September 15, 1869, to Susan Harris Coleman, 
of Nantucket, Mass., daughter of Capt. Ebenezer Coleman and Lydia Ray. 
She survives him, with two daughters. 

He died of paralysis of the heart, at Worcester, Mass., January 22, 1895, 
aged sixty- five years. 



GLASS OP 1855. 

George Cushing Knapp. 

Son of John Knapp and Sally Cushing; born in Lyndon, Vt., October 30, 
1823; prepared for college at Burr Seminary, Manchester, Vt. ; graduated at 
Middlebury College, 1852; taught one term in Middlebury Female Seminary; 
took the full course in this Seminary, 1852-55; was licensed to preach by the 
Rutland (Vt.) Association, February 13, 1855. He was ordained as foreign 
missionary at Rutland, Vt., September 7, 1855, an d embarked the following 
month for his missionary field in Eastern Turkey, where in the service of the 
American Board he has labored for nearly forty years with conspicuous earnest- 
ness, energy, and fidelity. For two years he was stationed at Diabekir, after- 



163 

wards at Bitlis. His service was attended at times with special hardships and 
perils. In 1883 he and his associate, Dr. Raynolds, were attacked while travel- 
ing by Koords, robbed, beaten, wounded, tied, and thrown into the bushes, as 
the robbers supposed, to die. From this terrible shock Mr. Knapp never fully 
recovered, and the missionaries at Bitlis have had their full share of anxiety and 
trouble in connection with the present period of misrule in that country. 

His classmate at Andover, Rev. Dr. E. E. Strong, editorial secretary of the 
American Board, sends the following : " During our Seminary course Mr. Knapp 
seemed to have received a special quickening of all his powers, spiritual and in- 
tellectual, in connection with his decision to enter upon foreign missionary work. 
The new consecration which he made of himself affected his whole life. He 
went joyously to his missionary work in Turkey, and after years of patient and 
self-denying toil he won the hearts of the people by his loving and godly life. 
A remarkable testimony to his worth is the fact that when he died the Gregorian 
Armenians asked that his body might be buried in one of their churches or mon- 
asteries. Those who at his coming rejected and even stoned him flocked to his 
funeral in great numbers, while three Gregorian priests in their full robes, in 
connection with their choristers, asked the privilege of participating in the serv- 
ices. The honors paid him by the Armenians were unparalleled. They closed 
all their shops on the day of his funeral and their schools for three days. This 
was the voluntary testimony of a large city to the blameless life of Mr. Knapp." 

He was married, September 6, 1855, to Alzina Maria Churchill, of Hubbard- 
ton, Vt., daughter of Samuel S. Churchill and Mary Richardson. She survives 
him, with two sons and two daughters. Rev. George P. Knapp, a graduate of 
Harvard College and Hartford Seminary, and one of the daughters, a graduate 
of Mt. Holyoke College, are missionaries at Bitlis. Two children died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Knapp died of apoplexy, at Bitlis, Turkey, March 12, 1895, aged sev- 
enty-one years. 

Mason Moore. 

Son of Ariel Moore and Electa Lyon ; born in Sheffield, Ohio, February 28, 
1822; prepared for college at Williston Seminary; graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1852; studied one year in Bangor Seminary, and two years in this Sem- 
inary, 1853-55 ; licensed to preach by the Derry (N. H.) Association, February 6, 
1855; began preaching at once after graduation in Lee, N. H., and remained 
there until 1869, although not ordained until December 3, 1867, a church being 
organized there on the same day. He afterwards preached at Northville, N. Y., 
Harrisville, N. Y., and Worcester, Vt., 1872-73; resided with his sister at Sara- 
toga Springs, N. Y,, until 1877, when he removed to Plymouth, Vt., supplying 
the church there, 1877-79, and continuing to reside there afterwards, devoting 
himself principally to farming. 

Mr. Moore was a nephew of Mary Lyon, and his sister, Abigail Moore, was 
associated with Miss Lyon many years at Mt. Holyoke Seminary, afterwards 
becoming the wife of Rev. Ebenezer Burgess (Class of 1837) and dying in the 
missionary service in India. Prof. Jeremiah Smith, LL.D., of the Law School 
of Harvard University, writes of him: " I knew Mr. Moore intimately, having 
been a resident of Lee during the greater part of his ministry there. I was too 



164 

old to be one of his scholars, but was one of his parishioners. Mr. Moore was 
one of the two best men I have ever known. He was singularly shy and retir- 
ing, but willing to go anywhere and do anything if there was a reasonable pros- 
pect of rendering service to his fellow men. The aspect of the field at Lee when 
he came there was discouraging. Very few clergymen would have continued 
long enough to build up a good congregation and a living church, but Mr. 
Moore had the faith and the patience to remain there until matters were in a 
good train. That town owes him a great deal. He was a man of very fair 
ability. While he was not, as a preacher, popular with the mass, it should be 
said that those who liked his sermons best were among his best educated and 
most intellectual hearers." 

Mr. Moore died of pneumonia, at Plymouth, Vt., December 13, 1893, in nis 
seventy-second year. He was never married. 



GLASS OF 1857. 

Alpheus Sanford Nickerson. 

Son of Capt. Theophilus Nickerson and Mary Sanford; born in South 
Dennis, Mass., April 29, 1831 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover; graduated at Amherst College, 1854; took the full course in this Sem- 
inary, 1854-57 ; licensed to preach by the Middlesex South Association, at 
Framingham, January 13, 1857 ; ordained at North Woburn, Mass., February 2, 
1858; acting pastor there, 1857-58; pastor afterwards of Unitarian churches: 
Chelsea, 1859-64; Sterling, 1864-69; Melrose, 1869-70; Plymouth (Universal- 
ist Society), 1871-73; Newport, N. H., 1874-76; Charlestown, N. H., 1876-78; 
Boston (without charge), 1878-83 ; Warwick, Mass., 1883-85 ; residing in Cam- 
bridge from 1887, but supplying at Winthrop, 1890. 

Mr. Nickerson's sermon before the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany in i860 was published. His Seminary classmate, Rev. Edward C. Guild, 
writes: "My recollections of Mr. Nickerson are kindly. His character was 
upright and pure, and his Christian purpose sound and strong." Hon. Charles 
P. Rugg, of New Bedford, secretary of his college class, writes of Mr. Nicker- 
son : " He was a quiet man, doing his professional work in an unostentatious 
way. He sought to do good rather than to be popular. He had various fields 
of labor, and in all won for himself a good name for good deeds." 

Mr. Nickerson was married, October 28, 1858, to Jeannie Humphrey, of 
Boston, daughter of William Humphrey and Eunice Endicott. She died De- 
cember 8, 1875. Their youngest son graduated at Harvard College and studied 
in the Harvard Divinity School, but died before completing his studies. One 
son and two daughters survive. 

Mr. Nickerson died of paralysis, at South Dennis, Mass., August 17, 1894, 
aged sixty-three years. 

GLASS OF 1858. 
William Wheeler Parker. 

Son of Ebenezer Parker and Hannah Merriam ; born in Princeton, Mass., 
March 2, 1824; converted while a clerk in Worcester, he determined to enter 
the ministry and prepared for college at Monson Academy, but when ready to 



i6s 

enter Amherst College was compelled by the failure of his health to relinquish 
his plan ; was engaged in work (as an overseer) in the Lancaster Mills at Clin- 
ton, Mass., for about nine years; then resumed his studies at Monson Acad- 
emy and entered Andover Seminary, taking the full course, 1855-58; was 
licensed to preach by the Middlesex South Association at Framingham, Mass., 
December 29, 1857. He was ordained at York, Me., December 28, 1858, and 
was pastor there until 1861 : subsequently at East Cambridge, Mass., 1861-64 ; 
at Groton, Mass., 1865-68; at Williamsburg, Mass., 1869-73; at WestBoylston, 
Mass., 1873-77. He continued to reside in West Boylston afterwards, but had 
short terms of pastoral service at Milton (First Church), 1878-80; Holden, 
1882-85; Wayland, 1885-87; Pigeon Cove, 1888-89; Harwichport, 1889-90; 
West Newbury (First Church), 1891-92 ; Oakham, 1893 to the time of his 
death. 

Mr. Parker, though of quiet, simple ways, was personally a most genial 
and lovable man, and as a Christian worker remarkably earnest and faithful, 
from the early years at Clinton when as a factory overseer he led many to 
Christ to his last moment when in making a pastoral call he suddenly died. 
Rev. Dr. George H. Gould, of Worcester (Class of 1853), writes of him: 
"Brother Parker was one of the noblest men I ever knew. His character 
was manly and true from center to circumference. During our student days 
together [at Monson Academy] he was incarnated 'sweetness and light.' He 
was unselfish, generous, guileless, magnanimous in his estimate of others, with- 
out a trace of pettiness or self-seeking in his whole nature. Everybody loved 
Parker. He was a diligent and capable scholar, and would have made his 
mark in college had he been permitted to enter. As a minister he 'commended 
himself to every man's conscience' as a true man of God, full of faith and of 
the Holy Ghost." Rev. Perley B. Davis, of Dorchester (Class of 1861), says 
of him : " He had a passion for preaching. He enjoyed nothing so much as to 
proclaim the gospel. He labored to bring men to Christ, and in this was re- 
markably successful. His life was full of good deeds. His benefactions, 
though unheralded, were numerous. His memory is tenderly enshrined in the 
hearts of very many. He died with his armor on, exchanging it, I believe, for 
a crown set with many gems." 

Mr. Parker was married, August 24, 1847, to Emily Walker, of Holden, 
Mass., daughter of Joel Walker and Diodamia Stone, who survives him. 

Mr. Parker died of heart disease, at Oakham, Mass., September 22, 1894, 
aged seventy years. 



GLASS OF 1859. 
Austin Hazen. 

Son of Rev. Austin Hazen and Lucia Washburn (who was daughter of 
Rev. Azel Washburn) ; born in Hartford, Vt., February 14, 1835; prepared for 
college at St. Johnsbury (Vt.) Academy; graduated at the University of Ver- 
mont, 1855; instructor in Barre (Vt.) Academy, 1855-56; took the full course 
in this Seminary, 1856-59; licensed by the Salem Association, February 8, 1859; 
ordained pastor of the church in Norwich, Vt., March 29, i860, remaining there 
until 1864. He spent the remainder of his life in most faithful service in two adja- 
cent towns — Jericho Centre, Vt., 1864-84, and Richmond, 1875-95, having for 



i66 

nearly ten years the charge of both churches. He published in 1891 a centen- 
nial sermon preached at Jericho Centre. 

Mr. Hazen was a brother of Rev. Allen Hazen (Class of 1845), Rev. Wil- 
liam S. Hazen (Class of 1863), and Rev - Dr - Azel W - Hazen (Class of 1868). 
His cousin, Rev. Dr. Henry A. Hazen (Class of 1857), sends the following 
tribute: "Austin Hazen was of a ministerial family. He was one of five 
brothers, four of whom were ministers, while his older sister was the wife of 
Rev. David T. Stoddard (Class of 1842), of blessed memory as a missionary to 
the Nestorians. His own loyalty to his high calling and his influence in his 
home are shown by the fact that his seven sons are all college men — four of 
them in the ministry, or in preparation for it, while the two younger ones, still 
in college, may follow the same path. Mr. Hazen ranked high as a scholar, 
and as a man was honored and beloved by all who knew him well. He loved 
the truth as he had been taught, and was faithful to his convictions, but an 
enemy he could not have had. A modest man, diligent and wise in his pas- 
toral work, he has left a record in the hearts of his people in which any man 
might rejoice. His end has come, in a providence to us dark and mysterious, 
but he was ready for the Master's call, and sleeps well." 

Mr. Hazen was married, February 12, 1862, to Mary Jane Carlton, of 
Barre, Vt., daughter of David Carlton and Mary Wheeler. She died April 12, 
1880, and he married, second, June 1, 1881, Almira Farrington Elliot, of Jericho 
Centre, daughter of Dea. Ezra Elliot and Eliza Hall. She survives him, with 
seven sons, a daughter having died in infancy. All the sons, as intimated 
above by Dr. Hazen, are graduates of, or at present students in, the University 
of Vermont. Four of them are graduates of, or students in, Hartford Semi- 
nary. Rev. Carleton Hazen is pastor in Rochester, Vt., and Austin Hazen, Jr., 
is studying in Germany. 

Mr. Hazen sailed with his wife and brother from New York for Genoa, on 
the steamer Werra, for a vacation tour. A cablegram received from Gibraltar 
by Dr. Azel W. Hazen as this Necrology goes to press tells all that is yet 
known of his death : " Austin buried at sea." His age was sixty years. 

John Haskell Shedd, D.D. 

Son of Rev. Henry Shedd (Class of 1829) and Mary Gerrish ; born in Mt. 
Gilead, Ohio, July 9, 1833; prepared for college at Marysville (Ohio) Academy, 
took his freshman year at Ohio Wesleyan University, and graduated at Marietta 
College, 1856; studied in Lane Theological Seminary, 1856-58, and graduated 
from this Seminary, 1859 ; licensed to preach by Marion (Ohio) Presbytery, 
April 7, 1858; ordained by the Presbytery of Franklin, at Mt. Gilead, Ohio, as 
foreign missionary, August 3, 1859; embarked for Persia in the same month 
under appointment of the American Board, and has been since connected with 
the Nestorian Mission. He visited this country in 1870 and remained until 
1878, laboring in behalf of foreign missions, and, 1872-78, for the higher 
education of the freedmen, as professor in Biddle University, North Carolina. 
After his return to Persia he was president of Oroomiah College and Theo- 
logical Seminary. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Marietta 
College in 1878. 

Rev. Dr. Benjamin Labaree, his classmate at Andover and associate in the 



i6y 

mission field, now one of the secretaries of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign 
Missions in New York, sends this tribute : "Dr. Shedd joined our class in its 
senior year. In his brief association with us he made the impression of a man 
superior in his intellectual endowments, eloquent in public address, and ruled 
by deep convictions of Christian duty, an estimate fully sustained by his subse- 
quent career. He brought to his life service untiring energy of body and mind. 
He believed, however, in hard work, and was destined to wear out an excep- 
tionally rugged constitution at a comparatively early age. Whether in hard 
pioneer duty in the Kurdish Mountains, or at the head of the Missionary Col- 
lege, or as an organizer and superintendent of native churches, he was inces- 
santly active, resourceful, self-sacrificing to the last degree, inspiring others by 
his unfaltering faith in God and His truth, and winning by his devotion and sym- 
pathetic interest the confidence and affection of the people for whose spiritual 
elevation he toiled. I lis broad and comprehensive leadership, adorned by his 
consistent, transparent piety, have established for him an honored and enduring 
place in the history of the Church of Christ in Persia." 

Rev. Dr. William Hayes Ward, editor of the New York Independent, an- 
other classmate, writes : " Dr. Shedd was my classmate and room-mate at An- 
dover. I had for him the highest admiration as a man and respected him as a 
sound scholar. I regarded him then as a man who would achieve distinction 
as well as usefulness in the Christian ministry. There were then a large num- 
ber of us who were expecting to go as foreign missionaries, and we held our 
weekly meetings, at which David Scudder, who went to India; Amherst Lord 
Thompson, who died after six months' service in Oroomiah; and Goss, who 
went to Turkey, besides others, living and dead, were regular attendants. The 
consulting physician of the board would not permit consent to my wife's going, 
and that prevented me from being a companion of my room-mate, Shedd, and 
my other friends, Thompson and Labaree, in the Persian mission. But I have 
followed their life's service with deep interest, and the manly, devoted, practical 
Christian life and work of Dr. Shedd has commanded my unbounded respect." 

Dr. Shedd was married, July 28, 1859, to Sarah Jane Dawes, of Marietta, 
Ohio, daughter of Hon. Henry Dawes and Sarah Cutler, a great-granddaughter 
of Dr. Manasseh Cutler, of Massachusetts, the influential promoter of the early 
settlement and institutions of Ohio. She survives him, with four sons. One 
is a missionary teacher in Oroomiah, one is professor of Physics in Marietta 
College, and a third is studying theology at Princeton. Two sons and two 
daughters died in childhood. 

Dr. Shedd died of chronic diarrhea, at Oroomiah, Persia, April 12, 1895, 
in the sixty-second year of his age. 



CLASS OP 1860. 

John Quincy Bittinger. 

Son of Joseph Bittinger and Lydia Bair; born in Berwick, Pa., March 20, 
1831 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; graduated at Dart- 
mouth College, 1857 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1857-60 ; licensed 
to preach by the White River (Vt.) Association, January 10, i860; ordained at 
Yarmouth, Me., October 25, i860; pastor of Central Church there, 1860-64; 



1 68 

pastor of First Church, St. Albans, Vt, 1864-67 ; acting pastor of Broadway 
Church, Norwich, Ct., 1867-68; at Hartland, Vt., 1869-73; pastor at Haver- 
hill, N. H., 1874-86; continued to reside at Haverhill, in feeble health, until 
his death. 

He was editor of the New Hampshire Journal, 1886-88, and contributed 
valuable articles to the North American Review, the Bibliotheca Sacra, the An- 
dover Review, and other periodicals. He published a History of Haverhill, N H, 
and A Plea for the Sabbath and for Man, both of which, each in its own line, 
were works of great ability and research. He also published several memorial 
addresses. Rev. C. E. Milliken, of Swanzey, N. H., his college and Seminary 
classmate, and room-mate at Andover during the whole course, writes of him : 
"Mr. Bittinger was open, frank, and companionable in his social nature. As 
a student he was thorough and profound, quick to discern a flaw in argument, 
tracing it to its results to show its truth or falsity. At the same time he was 
appreciative. He was an admirer of our three principal instructors at Andover 

— Park, Phelps, and Shedd — often analyzing and contrasting their widely dif- 
ferent types of mind. He not unfrequently disagreed with some of their posi- 
tions, and many were the sharp though friendly discussions we had over them 

— questions then of great moment, but which we seemed to have settled, for 
I have scarcely heard of them since. As a preacher he was uniformly accept- 
able. His audiences always wanted to hear him again. His prolonged invalid- 
ism broke in upon his cherished plans, yet he bore it cheerfully. As a writer 
his style was logical, compact, incisive, polished, with a rhetoric that was fault- 
less. His last work, on the Sabbath, is a good example of the thoroughness of 
his study. He wrote and rewrote the whole and parts of it many times. His 
mind took the philosophical view of truth, yet not to the exclusion of the Bib- 
lical or practical." 

Mr. Bittinger was married, October 4, i860, to Sarah Jones Wainwright, of 
Hanover, N. H., daughter of Albert Wainwright and Sarah Jones. She sur- 
vives him, with three sons and a daughter, one daughter having died in in- 
fancy. Two sons were educated at Dartmouth College. 

Mr. Bittinger died of chronic rheumatism, at Haverhill, N. H., April 5, 1895, 
aged sixty- four years. 



Chester Case Humphrey. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Aaron C. Humphrey and Betsey Starr ; born in Liberty, Ohio, 
July 13, 1830; prepared for college at Davenport, Iowa; graduated at Iowa 
College, 1857 ; studied in this Seminary, 1857-58 ; graduated at Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1861 ; was ordained at Austin, Minn., July 21, 1861 ; preached 
there, 1861-63; at Cass, Iowa, 1863-67; Amity, Iowa, 1868-69; Tipton, Iowa 
(without charge), 1870-71 ; Camp Creek, Neb., 1871-72 ; Osceola, Neb., 1872-74 ; 
Albion, Boone, Dayton, and Oxford, Neb., 1874-78; Osceola, Neb., 1878-83, 
and Golden Prairie, Iowa (without charge), 1883-84 ; Waucoma and Lawler, 
Iowa, 1884; Hickory Grove and Wayne, Iowa, 1884-86; Cincinnati and Bel- 
knap, Iowa, 1886-87; Cromwell, Iowa, 1888-89; Summer Hill, Iowa, 1889-90; 
Wythe and West Rockford, 111., 1891 to the time of his death. 

An obituary notice in a local newspaper contained the following: "Mr. 
Humphrey was of the old school both in manner and matter of theological 



169 

teaching. He was of the most radical type of reform, laboring and sacrificing 
without consideration of personal interests. He was intensely in earnest as a 
preacher, seeking to win souls by the passionate fervor of his appeals and the 
prayerful earnestness of his pastoral visitations. He was in his true sphere as 
a country pastor. One could hardly mistake him for anything else, so thor- 
oughly was his calling and work impressed upon the man." 

He was married, September 29, 1859, to Elizabeth Sawyer Holt, of An- 
dover, Mass., daughter of Thomas Holt and Ruth Beard. She survives him, 
with three sons and one daughter. One of the sons is preparing for the min- 
istry in McCormick Theological Seminary. One son and two daughters have 
died. 

Mr. Humphrey died of cancer of the stomach, at Wythe, 111., January 5, 
1894, aged sixty- three years. 



CLASS OF 1862. 

George Wilson Howe. 

Son of Deacon Lorenzo Gilman Howe and Dorcas Mall on ; born in Lowell, 
Mass., January 5, 1833; prepared for college at the New Hampton (N. H.) Lit- 
erary and Biblical Institution ; graduated at Bowdoin College, 1859 ; studied 
theology one year in the Biblical Department at New Hampton, 1859-60, and 
in this Seminary, 1860-62; preached in the Free Baptist Church in Lowell, 
1863; ordained over the Free Baptist Church in Buxton, Me., November 12, 
1863, and remained there until 1866; pastor at Harrison, Me., 1867-72; agent 
of the Free Baptist Missionary Society of Maine, 1872-73; pastor, South Lim- 
ington, Me., 1874-76. From 1876 he was a teacher in Lowell, being successively 
principal of the Colburn and Varnum Grammar Schools. Mr. Howe was 
brother of Rev. Prof. James A. Howe, D.D., of the same Seminary class, dean 
of Cobb Divinity School in Bates College. 

Prof. J. Y. Stanton, of Bates College, his college and classmate at Bowdoin 
and at Andover, writes of him: " Mr. Howe was superior to most men in the 
clearness of his judgments, the fearlessness of his convictions, the fullness of 
his manhood. He brought all questions to the test of reason rather than to 
that of authority or tradition. While thoroughly evangelical in faith and spirit, 
he was of a temper that could not readily allow the decisions of his own mind 
in respect to truth, affairs, or men to be usurped by those commended to him 
by fathers, councils, or creeds. This independence of character made him an 
enjoyable friend and a useful member of society. A warm-hearted, true, faith- 
ful minister, teacher, and man, he lived to honor all his associations in life, to 
serve well his day, and to retain to the last the sincere admiration and esteem 
of at least one of his classmates." 

Mr. Howe was married, August 20, 1862, to Annie Eliza Bean, of Sand- 
wich, N.H., daughter of Daniel Quimby Bean and Grace Quimby. She died 
January 7, 1865. He married, second, September 12, 1866, Emily Roby Hob- 
son, of West Buxton, Me., daughter of Joseph Hobson and Mary Townsend. 
She survives him, with one son, a graduate of Harvard College, who is the 
editor of the Free Press, Burlington, Vt. 

Mr. Howe died of heart disease, at Lowell, Mass., March 21, 1894, aged 
sixty- one years. 



170 
CLASS OP 1866. 

Alfred Perry Johnson. 

Son of Obadiah Perry Johnson and Abigail Maria Reed ; born in Bedford, 
Mass., April 3, 1836; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; 
graduated at Harvard College, 1861 ; taught in Bound Brook, N.J., 1861-62; 
enlisted from Cambridge in 44th Massachusetts Regiment and served nine 
months, and was afterwards in the service of the United States Christian Com- 
mission ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1863-66; was licensed to preach 
by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. George Pierce, Jr., Dracut, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1866. He was ordained at Paola, Kan., November 19, 1867, his serv- 
ice there continuing from 1866 to 1869, and his subsequent pastorates were at 
Woodstock, 111., 1870-72; Platteville, Wis., 1872-86; Springfield, Mo. (Central 
Church), 18S6-89; Joplin, Mo., 1890-92; Spring Valley, 111., 1892 until his death. 

Rev. J. G. Merrill, D.D., a Seminary classmate, writes: "Johnson was a 
favorite in our class. His manly bearing and genial disposition made him 
friends in all the classes of the institution. He determined to enter the mis- 
sionary field at the West, and the missionary spirit always burned within him. 
He had struggling enterprises and trying fields, but he bravely faced all obsta- 
cles, and everywhere commanded the esteem and love of those who wrought 
with him and the respect and admiration of others." Rev. C. D. Adams (Class 
of 1882), of Dartmouth College, says of him : "I count the friendship and fel- 
lowship of Rev. A. P. Johnson, my pastor in Springfield, Mo., a rich privilege, 
and lasting in its influence on my life. . . . His power was primarily in the per- 
fect sincerity and devotion of his own life and his clear insight into the finest 
truth. His love to the Heavenly Father and to all his children was his starting 
point for all thinking. It led him sometimes to conclusions different from many 
of his brethren, but such difference always seemed small in the light of his 
sweet Christian life." 

Mr. Johnson was married, December 3, 1867, to Terressa Elizabeth Shively, 
of Marion, Ind., daughter of Hon. James Scott Shively, M.D., and Harriet 
Olive Marshall. She survives him, with a son and a daughter, one son having 
died in childhood. 

Mr. Johnson died of pericarditis, at Spring Valley, 111., June 29, 1894, aged 
fifty-eight years. 

Bernard Paine. 

Son of Levi Paine and Clementine Leonard; born in East Randolph, Mass., 
September 21, 1834; prepared for college at Bridgewater Normal School and 
Dummer Academy, Byfield, Mass.; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1863; 
studied in Union Seminary, 1863-64, and in this Seminary, 1864-66; licensed 
by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. George Pierce, Jr., Dracut, 
February 13, 1866; ordained pastor of the Pacific Church, New Bedford, Mass., 
June 6, 1867, and remained there until 1871. His subsequent pastorates were 
at Foxboro, Mass., 1871-77 ; resided in Boston, 1878-79; in West Barnstable, 
1879-80, supplying at Wood's Holl ; Sandwich, Mass., 1880-64; Old Saybrook, 
Ct., 1885-94. 

Rev. A. W. Hazen, D.D., of Middletown, Ct. (Class of 1868), Mr. Paine's 
college room-mate and intimate friend through life, said of him before the Mid- 
dlesex (Ct.) Conference: "I need not say more of my friend as a minister of 



171 

the gospel of the grace of God. You know his steadfast loyalty to the truth, 
to the Church, and to the name of Christ. He was a model pastor as well as 
an intelligent, a stimulating, and a spiritual preacher. His public prayers were 
such as only one who prayed much in private could offer. The life and death 
of Bernard Paine seem to me like a great victory — a victory over self, over the 
world, over the last enemy. And the peace of God is his." 

Mr. Paine was married, December 4, 1867, to Eliza Smith Blossom, of East 
Sandwich, Mass., daughter of Bennett W. Blossom and Abby Robinson, who 
survives him, with one son and three daughters, one daughter having died in 
infancy. 

He died of neuralgia of the heart, at Old Saybrook, Ct., June 11, 1894, in 
the sixtieth year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1867. 

Edwin Jarvis Hart. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Russell Hart and Wealthy Britain ; born in East Brewer (now Holden), 
Me., September 16, 1825 ; studied at Hampden (Me.) Academy and other schools ; 
took his theological course at Bangor Seminary, graduating in 1855 ; licensed by 
the Penobscot (Me.) Association, December 19, 1854; ordained at Merrimack, 
N. H., January 1, 1856, and pastor there until 1865; resident licentiate at this 
Seminary, 1865-67 ; acting pastor at Cottage Grove, Minn., 1867-71, and pastor, 
1871-79; without charge there afterwards until his death. 

Mr. Hart served in the Christian and Sanitary Commissions in Tennessee 
in 1863. Rev. Jules A. Derome, pastor of the church in Cottage Grove, writes 
of him : " He was a good man. Such a tribute means more than may appear 
at first. He was sincere and earnest, and did his best as a pastor. He was a 
scholar of much ability and a good preacher. His sermons were always care- 
fully prepared and listened to with attention and profit. He belonged to the 
old school of New England theology, but always made more of the Bible than 
of any particular theological tenet. He was for many years one of the leading 
members and best advisers of the old St. Croix Valley Conference." 

He was married, November 11, 1855, to Mary Elizabeth Fanning, of Pitts- 
field, Mass., daughter of Charles O. Fanning and Fidelia Holbrook. She sur- 
vives him. 

He died of progressive muscular atrophy, at Cottage Grove, Minn., April 16, 
1893, in the sixty-eighth year of his age. 

CLASS OF 1875. 

John Howard Hincks. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of John Winslow Hincks and Sarah Ann Blodget; born in Bucks- 
port, Me., March 19, 1849 5 prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
being the valedictorian of his class ; graduated at Yale College, 1872, dividing 
with a classmate the honor of the DeForest medal ; entered this Seminary in 
1872, but was obliged in the second year of the course to suspend study and 
seek a change of climate in California; he was there licensed to preach by the 
Bay Association and was able to preach somewhat; returning, he completed 
his theological course at Yale Divinity School, 1874-76, and was licensed by 
the New Haven Central Association, May 9, 1876. He was ordained pastor 



172 

of the Bethany Church, Montpelier, Vt., as successor to Rev. William H. Lord, 
D.D. (Class of 1846), September 27, 1877, and remained there eleven years. 
From 18S9 to the time of his death he was professor of History and Social Sci- 
ence in Atlanta University, being also dean of the faculty, editor of the college 
paper, and in the president's absence taking his place. Mr. Hincks was brother 
of Prof. E. Y. Hincks, of Andover Seminary. 

Rev. Prof. A. R. Merriam (Class of 1877), of Hartford Theological Sem- 
inary, a classmate at Phillips and at Yale, sends this tribute: " Mr. Hincks was 
always facile princeps in character and influence. In his career he has shown a 
most remarkable range of gifts in Christ's service. Preeminently a man of in- 
tellectual power in academy and in college, he became eminent as a pastor by 
his sympathetic ministries and lowly fidelities, and as dean of Atlanta by his 
business ability and administrative force — an unusual combination of qualities 
in very diverse fields. Men who have known him only at one period of his life 
are surprised to learn of traits which distinguished him in other fields. The 
secret of his life was his complete consecration. He talked little about it, but 
he gave himself unreservedly to the work before him. Phillips Academy and 
Andover Seminary have sent out no finer type of a Christian scholar and 
minister than this man, so strong, so sweet, so brilliant, so sympathetic, and 
so nobly devoted to the call of faith and duty." 

Mr. Hincks was married, April 4, 1878, to Jennie King Thurston, of Old 
Saybrook, Ct., daughter of Rev. Richard Bowers Thurston and Jane Miller 
Pierce. She survives him, with two sons and two daughters, one son having 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Hincks died of typhoid fever, at Atlanta, Ga., December 11, 1894, in 
the forty-sixth year of his age. 



CLASS OF 1876. 

Charles Nelson Brainerd. 

Son of Lawrence Robbins Brainerd and Catherine Wood; born in St. 
Albans, Vt., April 27, 1849; prepared for college at St. Albans Academy ; grad- 
uated at Middlebury College, 1873; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1&73-76; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. 
F. G. Wright, Andover, June 22, 1875. He wa s ordained as pastor of the 
church in South Dennis, Mass., December 22, 1876, and remained there three 
years. He was acting pastor at Wallingford, Vt., 1880-82 ; his health then 
failing, he was afterwards without charge at Northampton, Mass., and Brattle- 
boro, Vt., until his death. 

Mr. Brainerd's attached friend, Rev. Herbert W. Lathe (Class of 1877), 
writes of him : " He was a man of deep piety and quick sympathies, amiable 
and affectionate in disposition, and of sanguine temperament. A great hater of 
shams, he was peculiarly earnest to find the truth for himself, and, when found, 
to be loyal to it. His winning ways and sterling character account for his in- 
variable popularity. His sermons were manly and strong rather than senti- 
mental, and he was specially gifted in commending the gospel to men. Com- 
pelled to retire from the ministry after a short service, he longed and expected 
to return to it, and his early death removed from the world a devoted Christian, 
a most companionable and lovable friend, and a faithful minister of the Word." 



173 

Mr. Brainerd was married, October 15, 1878, to Emily Clara Sanford, of 
Orwell, Vt., daughter of William Riley Sanford and Emily Bascom. She sur- 
vives him, with two daughters. 

He died of brain disease and peritonitis, at Brattleboro, Vt., June 15, 1893, 
aged forty- four years. 

CLASS OF 1884. 

Henry Samuel Harrison. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Marvin Bennet Harrison and Grace Ann Bradley, both parents 
being from Connecticut; bom in Mendon, 111., December 18, 1849; attended 
the public schools ; at the age of seventeen became a clerk in Chicago ; from 
187 1 to 1880 was in business as a dry goods merchant there; took the full 
course in Chicago Theological Seminary, 1880-83; m tn i s Seminary as resident 
licentiate, 1883-84, also supplying the church at Ballardvale in Andover; ordained 
at York, Neb., December 18, 1884, and resigned his pastorate therein June, 1886, 
to take the position of business manager of the Chicago Advance, of which later 
he became editor and proprietor. 

Rev. Dr. Simeon Gilbert (Class of i860) said of him in a memorial issue of 
the Advance : " His convictions were rooted in his very being ; if they took pos- 
session of him at all they took possession of him wholly. His loyalty to the 
truth was of the absolute kind. Without a thought of martyrdom, he had the 
spirit, had there been the occasion for it, which would have made martyrdom 
the most natural thing in the world. As was to be expected in the experience 
of so great and varied responsibilities, his nature broadened, and he was contin- 
ually growing in mastery of apprehension of all the crowding issues of the time." 

Mr. Harrison was married, August 10, 1887, to Ruth Eunice Stone, of Char- 
lotte, Vt., daughter of Luther D. Stone and Phebe R. Keese. She survives him, 
with two daughters, one daughter having deceased. 

He was instantly killed by a passing train, at La Grange, 111., his suburban 
home, on the evening of November 21, 1894, in the forty-fifth year of his age. 



CLASS OP 1890. 

Carletto Francello Lewis. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of George Henry Lewis and Anna Frances Tillinghast; born in Woon- 
socket, R.I., February 15, 1863; early education obtained in the public schools 
of Westboro and Worcester, Mass., where successively he lived ; became inter- 
ested in religious work at Cherry Valley in Leicester, Mass.; took the full course 
at Bangor Seminary, 1886-89 5 was licensed by the Penobscot (Me.) Association, 
May 29, 1888 ; preached at Isle au Haut, Me., 1889 ; resident licentiate in this 
Seminary, 1889-90 ; acting pastor at Deerfleld, Mass., 1890-91 ; at Boylston, 
Mass., 1892-93, being ordained there June 7, 1892 ; afterwards without charge 
at Worcester. 

His self-denying efforts to secure a theological education had impaired his 
health, and consumption soon put an end to the ministerial work which he loved 
and was ambitious to the last to continue. He died of that disease, at Worces- 
ter, Mass., August 16, 1894, aged thirty-one years. 



174 

Exclusive of the two Visitors whose names stand at the head of our list, 
forty- two deaths are reported this year. The average age of these forty- two 
men is seventy-one years, six months, and seventeen davs. Two had passed 
the age of ninety; thirteen were between eighty and ninety, ten between seventy 
and eighty, eleven between sixty and seventy ; and only four were below fifty. 

Twenty- nine of the forty- two were full graduates of the Seminary, ten had 
taken a partial course here, and three were resident licentiates. All except one 
of the regular students and the three resident licentiates were college graduates, 
Yale and Amherst each sending eight, Middlebury five, Harvard and Dart- 
mouth three each, Brown University and the University of Vermont two each, 
Bowdoin, Williams, Union, Marietta, Iowa, and the Universities of Ohio and 
Michigan one each. One entered the Episcopal and three the Unitarian 
ministry, while at least six were pastors in the Presbyterian Church. 

The varied and useful service rendered to the Church by these brethren will 
be recognized as their names are read — Professor Shedd as the profound 
theological thinker and writer; Henry M. Storrs as the gifted pulpit and plat- 
form orator; Knapp and Shedd as honored and devoted missionaries in the 
foreign field; Lathrop Taylor and Luther Clapp laying good foundations in 
the West; Colton and Edwards, Byington and Bittinger, Parker and Paine, 
Hillard and Hincks, and others like them, doing earnest and successful work 
in the East. The latest and saddest death reported is that of Austin Hazen, 
the modest, faithful Vermont pastor, "buried at sea." 



The following men are still living of classes previous to and including the 
class of 1835 — sixty years ago: 

Age. 

1825. Mr. Isaac W. Wheelwright, South Byfield, Mass. ... 93 

1826. * Rev. Louis McDonald, Brattleboro, Vt. . . 94 

1827. * Rev. Edward Beecher, D.D., Brooklyn, N. Y 91 

1831. Rev. Prof. Edwards A. Park, D.D., LL.D., Andover, Mass. 86 

1832. Rev. Elias Riggs, D.D., LL.D., Constantinople, Turkey. . . 84 
Rev. Samuel F. Smith, D.D., Newton Centre, Mass. ... 86 

1833. Rev. George W. Kelley, Haverhill, Mass 86 

*Rev. James R. Davenport, New York City 82 

1834. Rev. Prof. Daniel Smith Talcott, D.D., Bangor, Me. . . 82 

* Rev. John J. Dana, Housatonic, Mass 8^ 

* Mr. Joseph L. Partridge, Brooklyn, N. Y 91 

* Prof. Samuel Porter, Washington, D. C 85 

* Rev. George T. Todd, Fond du Lac, Wis 84 

1835. Rev. Bela Fancher, Homer, Mich 88 

Rev. William C. Jackson, Newton, Mass 87 

Rev. Ezekiel Russell, D.D. v Lynn, Mass 85 

*Rev. Joseph W. Cross, West Boylston, Mass 87 



Non-graduates. 





ND P 


INDEX 


s. 1-5; 1890-95. 




Seco 


rinted Series, No 






PAGE. 




PAGE. 




PAGE. 


Adams, Benjamin S. . 
Aiken, Charles A. . . 


30 


Grout, Aldin .... 


102 


Partridge, George C. . . 


106 


52 


Gulliver, John P. . . 


. Il6 


Pease, Theodore C. . . 


129 
151 
44 
86 


Aiken, Edward . . . 


27 






Peck, Whitman . . . . 


Apthorp, William P. . 
Ayres, Rowland . . 


94 


Hadley, James B. . . 


• 14 


Peet, Josiah W. . . 


23 


Hale, John G. . . . 


• 50 


Perry, Hezekiah D. . 






Hall, Alfred H. . . . 


. 61 


Phelps, Austin . . . 


20 


Backus, Jonathan T. . 


38 


Halsey, Herman . . 


5 


Porter, Jeremiah . . 


99 
94 
132 


Baird, John G. . . . 


54 


Hammond, Henry L. 
Harrington, Eli W. . 


. 80 


Potter, Silas A. . . . 


Baldwin, Cyrus . . . 


112 


. 144 


Pound, Edward H. . 


Barrows, Charles D. . 


93 


Harris, Franklin D. . 


44 


Powell, Samuel W. . 


58 
49 


Beard, Edwin S. . . 


55 


Harrison, Henry S. 


• 173 


Pratt, Francis G. . . 


Bellows, Thomas 


10 


Hart, Edwin J. . . . 


• x 7 1 






Bingham, Hiram . . 


84 


Hathaway, George W. 


• 37 


Ransom, Calvin N. 


142 


Bittinger, John Q. . . 


.67 


Hazen, Austin . . . 


. 165 


Richards, Charles . . 


23 


Blanchard, Edmund H. 


51 


Hemenway, Asa . . 


43 


Richardson, Henry J. 


126 


Blanchard, Jonathan . 


42 


Herrick, Henry . . . 


• 141 


Rosamond , James . . 


16 


Bliss, Edwin E. . . . 


81 


Herrick, James . . . 


47 


Ross, A. Hastings . . 


90 


Blood, Daniel C. . . 


8 


Hillard, Elias B. . . 


. 161 






Boutwell, William T. . 


8 


Hincks, John H. . . 


• l 7 I 


Sessions, Alexander J. 


4i 


Brainerd, Charles N. . 


172 


Hitchcock, Henry C. . 


. 89 


Sessions, Joseph W. . 


12 


Brainerd, Timothy G. 


150 


Hitchcock, Robert S. . 


. 19 


Shackford, Charles C. 


45 


Bull, Edward C. . . 


102 


Holland, Frederic W. 


• 142 


Shedd, John H. . . . 


. 166 


Burr, Austin H. . . 


61 


Holmes, John S. . . 


49 


Shedd, William G. T. . 


x 53 


Burt, Daniel C. . . . 


IOI 


Hosmer, Samuel D. . 


. 161 


Sheldon, Luther H. . 


XI 3 


Burton, Horatio N. 


88 


Howe, George W. . . 


. 169 


Skelton, William J. . 


. 62 


Butler, Calvin . . . 


»5 


Howe, Samuel S. . . 


13 


Skinner, Thomas H. . 


46 


Butler, Daniel . . . 


7* 


Humphrey, Chester C. 


. 168 


Smart, Moses M. . . 


95 


Butler, S. Russell . . 


9' 






Smith, Edward P. . . 


59 


Byington, Swift . . . 


158 


Ingalls, Francis T. . . 


• 92 


Southgate, Horatio 
Spalding, Samuel J. . 


. 103 

48 


Callahan, Henry . . 


65 


Johnson, Alfred P. 


. 170 


Stearns, Edward J. 


17 


Cannon, Frederic E. . 


6 


Johnson, Gideon S. . 


. 66 


Stevens, Alfred . . . 


82 


Carleton, Hiram . . 


146 


Jones, John .... 


• 133 


Stevens, Charles E. . 


107 


Chapin, Lucius D. . . 


134 


Judkins, Benjamin . . 


. 123 


Storrs, Henrv M. . . 


• 159 


Cheever, George B. 


7 






Swift, Eliphalet Y. . . 


83 


Clapp, Luther . . 




Keep, Marcus R. . . 


. 118 






Cleaveland, George W. 


in 


Kendall, John B. . . 


8 


Tappan, Samuel S. 
Taylor, John 0. . . . 


15 


Coffin, William . . . 


24 


Kimball, Peter . . . 


• 75 


14 


Colton, Aaron M. . . 


148 


Kingsbury, Addison . 


• 37 


Taylor, Lathrop . . . 


. 152 


Constantine, George 


55 


Knapp, George C. . . 


. 162 


Tenney, Sewall . . . 


10 


Couch, Paul .... 


6 






Thayer, Thatcher . . 


104 


Crawley, Edmund A. . 


11 


Laine, Lewis F. . . . 


39 


Thrall, Samuel R. . . 


108 


Cushman, George F. . 


21 


Lawrence, John . . . 


. 114 


Thurston, Philander . 


127 






Leach, Daniel . . . 


13 


Thwing, Edward P. . 


125 


Dame, Charles . . . 


79 


Leland, John H. M. . 


. 118 


Titcomb, Philip . . . 


24 


Davis, Josiah G. . . 


1 10 


Leonard, Julius Y. 


. 124 


Todd, Charles N. . . 


25 


Dean, Samuel C. . . 


28 


Lewis, Carletto F. . . 


• 173 


Tolman, Albert . . . 


5o 


Dexter, Henry M. . . 


21 


Long, Walter R. . . 


• J 45 


Tolman, Richard . . 


"5 


Dickinson, James T. . 


63 


Loomis, Elias . . . 


. 64 


Tompkins, William R. 


28 


Dickinson. Obed . . 


87 


Lord, John .... 


• !47 


Torrey, David . . . 


157 


Dudley, John L. . . 


'54 


Loring, Joseph . . . 


• 39 


Train, Abner L. . . 


66 


Dutton, Albert I. . . 


56 


Lyman, Jabez B. . . 


■ 156 


Treadwell, Charles W. 
Tuck, Jeremy W. . . 
Tyler, Joseph H. . . 


18 
46 


Eastman. Lucius R. . 


4' 


Macdonald, John A. . 


• 30 


89 


Easton, David A. . . 


128 


Mackie, John M. . . 


. 146 






Edwards, Jonathan 


157 


Marsh, Eliezer J. . . 


. 80 


Waldo, Seth H. . . . 


64 


Emerson, Daniel . . 


"3 


Marshall, Lyman . . 


29 


Welch, Ransom B. . 


26 


Evans, Samuel E. . . 


58 


Martin, George P. . . 


• *33 


Wells, Moses H. . . 


119 






Means, James H. . . 


. 121 


White, Lorenzo J. . . 
White, Orlando H. . . 


92 


Felch, Charles P. . . 


160 


Mears, Lucien D. . . 


. 60 


5i 


Fessenden, Thomas K. 


105 


Megie, Burtis C. . . 


. 16 


White, William J. . . 


19 


Field, Justin .... 


84 


Merrill, Josiah . . . 


122 


Willey, Charles . . . 


116 


Field, Thomas P. . . 


109 


Moore, Mason . . . 


. 163 


Winchester, Oliver W. 


28 


Fiske, Albert W. . . 


76 


Morong, Thomas . . 


. 123 


Withington, William . 


74 


Fletcher, James . . . 
Flint, Kendall . . . 


85 

77 

9 

40 


Morse, Henry C. . . 


22 


Wood, Abel .... 
Wood, Artemas A. . . 


25 
43 


Folsom, Nathaniel S. . 


Neill, Edward D. . . 


. 120 


Wood, Charles W. . . 


149 


Fosdick, David . . . 


Newell, William W. . 


12 


Woodworth, Henry D. 


5 i 


Foster, Roswell . . . 


53 


Nichols, Henry F. C. . 


29 


Woodworth, William W. 


18 


Frederick, Henry A. . 


62 


Nickerson, Alpheus S. 
Norcross, Albert F. . 


. 164 
• 131 


Worcester, Isaac R. . 
Worcester, John H., Jr. 


76 
129 


Gem-, Elbridge . . . 
Goodwin, Daniel . . 


57 


Noyes, Joseph T. . . 


• 8 S 


TRUSTEE. 




105 






Taylor, Edward . . . 


73 


Goodwin, Henry M. . 


87 


Paine, Bernard . . . 


. 170 




Greeley, Edward H. . 


26 


Park, Calvin E. . . . 


• 143 


VISITORS. 




Greeley, Stephen S. N. 


79 


Parker, William W. . 


. 164 


Marshall, Joshua N. . 
Seelye, Julius H. . . 


140 


Grosvenor, Charles P. 


ICO 


Parmelee, Anson H. . 


• 152 


139 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



Rev. A. E. Dunning, D.D., Class of 1870, Moderator, 1894 

Rev. Prof. W. H. Ryder, D.D., Class of 1869, " 

Rev. William J. Batt, Class of 1858, 

Rev. Harry P. Dewey, Class of 1887, 

Rev. Frederick H. Page, Class of 1893, 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Class of 1875, Secretary, 1892-95 



Committee, 
1894-95' 



NOTICE. 

The list of deceased alumni is presented annually in con- 
nection with the meeting of the Association at the June anniver- 
saries. Alumni are earnestly requested to communicate the fact 
of the death of any past member of the Seminary, together with 
any newspaper notices or memorial sketches. These, with change 
of address, or other information relating to the record of living 
alumni, should be sent to the Secretary of the Association. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1895-96, 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 10, 1896, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. 6. 



BOSTON: 
Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street, 

1896. 



i nsr id :e ix: _ 

Class. A g e - Pa ge. 

1848. Edmund K. Alden 7 1 209 

1841. Ephraim W. Allen 82 198 

1837. John H. Avery 87 190 

1836. Nathaniel Beach 86 190 

1827. Edward Beecher 9 1 l8 2 

1875. William P. Bennett 59 230 

1893. Edwin U. Blanchard 36 232 

1844. William S. Blanchard ; 83 202 

1842. Edward P. Blodgett 80 200 

1853. David Bremner 67 215 

1870. Arthur Brooks 50 228 

1837. Josiah B.Clark 88 192 

1852. Nathaniel G. Clark 70 213 

1837. William S. Coggin 82 191 

1875. John w - Colwell 48 230 

1833. James R. Davenport 83 186 

1871. Henry S. Deforest 62 229 

1864. Daniel Denison 56 225 

1837. Thomas Douglas 87 193 

1838. Alfred Emerson 83 194 

1845. Joshua S. Gay 77 204 

1845. Charles H. Hall 74 206 

1848. John W. Harding 74 210 

1841. David G. Haskins 78 199 

1849. Stephen A. Holt 75 211 

1863. James W. Hubbell 61 224 

1853. Henry S. Huntington 67 216 

1835. William C. Jackson 87 188 

1856. Amos H. Johnson 65 218 

1852. Sylvanus C. Kendall 70 212 

1838. Harvey D. Kitchel 83 195 

1826. Louis McDonald 94 182 

1844. George F. Magoun 74 203 

1862. Daniel A. Miles 60 224 

1845. William Miller 78 205 

1864. Franklin B. Norton 62 226 

1870. Charles W. Park 50 227 

1841. Charles Peabody 85 197 

1852. John Q. Peabody 70 213 

1835. Ezekiel Russell 90 189 

1856. George B. Safford 63 219 

1854. William Sewall 68 217 

1868. Amos F. Shattuck 63 226 

1859. Edward A. Smith 60 223 

1832. Samuel F. Smith 87 184 

1857. Sylvester D. Storrs 75 221 

1834. Daniel S. Talcott 82 186 

1843. Edwin B. Turner 82 201 

1882. Stephen W. Webb 53 231 

1846. Francis B. Wheeler 77 207 

1825. Isaac Watts Wheelwright 93 180 

1856. James White 67 220 

1847. Martin K. Whittlesey 74 208 

1840. Daniel Wight 87 196 

Not Previously Reported. 

1841. Henry Kingsley . 84 234 

1837. Daniel B. Woods 82 233 

Visitor. 

Hon. Charles Theodore Russell 80 179 



IsTEOI2;OI_,Oa-*Y". 



VISITOR. 

Hon. Charles Theodore Russell. 

Son of Hon. Charles Russell and Persis Hastings; born in Princeton, 
Mass., November 20, 181 5; prepared for college at Princeton Academy and 
under the tuition of Rev. Warren Goddard; graduated at Harvard College, 
1837, as salutatorian, giving also the valedictory oration on taking his Master's 
degree in 1840; studied law at Harvard Law School and in the office of Henry 
H. Fuller, Boston; admitted to Suffolk Bar in 1839; in partnership first with 
Mr. Fuller, and from 1845 with his brother, Thomas H. Russell, the firm later 
including his sons, Charles Theodore Russell, Jr., and William E. Russell (ex- 
Governor of the Commonwealth). He resided in Boston until 1855, afterwards 
in Cambridge. 

His first public office was in 1849 3L& a member of the Boston School Com- 
mittee, from which he was dropped after one year's service because he advo- 
cated the admission of colored children to the public schools on an equality 
with white children. He was a member of the House of Representatives from 
Boston, 1844, 1845, l8 5°5 of th e Senate from Suffolk County in 1851 and 1852, 
and from Middlesex County, 1877, 1878; he was mayor of Cambridge in 1861 and 
1862 ; from 1873 he was professor of Practice, Evidence, and Admiralty Law in 
Boston University. He was a member of the American Oriental Society. He 
was actively and efficiently connected with nearly all the benevolent societies of 
the Congregationalists — a corporate member of the American Board, director 
of the Home Missionary Society, the Congregational Publishing Society and 
the Massachusetts Bible Society, president of the Congregational Club and, at 
the time of his death, of the Board of Ministerial Aid. He was one of the 
Board of Visitors of Andover Theological Seminary, and secretary of the Board, 
from 1874 to 1885. He delivered the Fourth of July oration in Boston, 1851, 
before the city authorities. He published a history of his native town of Prince- 
ton, Mass., in 1838, and delivered the centennial address there in 1859. 

Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., pastor of the First Church, Cambridge 
(Class of 1861), says of him: "Mr. Russell was happy in all the conditions of 
his life. He grew up among the hills in the strength, the sincerity, and sim- 
plicity of a New England home. He had the training of Harvard College, and 
chose one of the three learned professions of his time, in which he rose to dis- 
tinction, adding honor where he gained renown. With his wide learning and 
large experience he crowned the practice of the law by becoming the instructor 
of young men who sought to enter his profession. Thus he prolonged his life. 
He was a lawyer, and more. He gave thoughtful care to religious institutions, 
and was a counselor who spoke with authority. For eight and fifty years he 
lived in the fellowship of the church, for the greater part of the time of the 
First Church in Cambridge. He was a deacon in the church, superintendent of 



i8o 

the Sunday school, and for many years the teacher of a class of college students. 
He built no wall about his life, and was as ready in public and in private to 
teach the divine commandments as the statutes of the State. He was as simple 
in his faith as he was profound in his learning. His confession of his spiritual 
life was natural and without art. In his near personal relations his friendship 
was as virtuous as his bearing was admirable. His fine presence, his winning 
voice, his pleasant smile, his courteous greeting, his ample sympathy, can never 
leave the mind that knew them. At the close the spirit of the man was upborne 
by the spirit of God, and he went on in * the power of an endless life.' " 

He was married, June I, 1840, to Sarah Elizabeth Ballister, of Dorchester, 
daughter of Joseph Ballister and Sarah Yendell. He had four sons and six 
daughters. Three daughters died in infancy. 

Mr. Russell died of pneumonia, in Cambridge, Mass., January 16, 1896, 
aged eighty years, two months, and twenty-six days. 



ALUMNI. 



GLASS OF 1825. 

Isaac Watts Wheelwright. 

Son of Ebenezer Wheelwright and Anna Coombs ; born in Newburyport, 
Mass., September 17, 1801 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, 1813-17; graduated at Bowdoin College, 1821 (boarding in President 
Appleton's family, while a daughter of Dr. Appleton, afterwards the wife of 
President Pierce, boarded in the Wheelwright family at Newburyport) ; en- 
tered Andover Seminary in 182 1, graduated in 1825, and was licensed to preach 
by the Norfolk Association, at East Randolph (now Holbrook),- April 25, 1826. 
He was assistant teacher in Phillips Academy, 1822-23, and also 1825-26, be- 
sides having classes during his last two years in the Seminary. He filled the 
same position at Dummer Academy in Byfieid, 1826-28; preached at Harwich, 
Mass., 1828-29; was principal of Newburyport Academy for one or two years, 
and afterwards taught in New Orleans. In 1833 he was appointed agent of the 
American Bible Society for the circulation of the Scriptures in South America, 
arriving in 1834 at Valparaiso, the residence of his brother, William Wheel- 
wright, who was then beginning his remarkable career as the founder and pro- 
moter of great engineering and industrial enterprises in that region. After two 
years of discouraging effort he turned his attention to teaching, and introduced 
Lancasterian schools in Guayaquil and Quito, living in the family of the Presi- 
dent of the Republic, who made him Director of Education. Obliged by the 
unsettled state of the government to leave Chili, he spent two years in Massa- 
chusetts, and then went back to South America, establishing and carrying on 
for ten years a young ladies' school at Valparaiso. In 1853 he returned to the 
United States, bought the historic parsonage in Byfieid Parish, the birthplace 
of Theophilus Parsons, and there spent the remainder of his life, having occa- 
sionally classical pupils under his charge. He was postmaster of South Byfieid 
from 1873 t0 l %%9- 



I8i 

Mr. Wheelwright's quiet, simple life for forty years past was in direct con- 
trast to the adventurous work and experiences of earlier years. He used to re- 
call the acquaintance at Quito with Charles Darwin, afterwards the eminent 
naturalist, whom he accompanied on mountain trips. In 1841 he undertook an 
important commission for his brother, making a journey of five hundred miles 
across the Andes, carried some of the way on a native's back, to carry a peti- 
tion to the Colombian Government at Bogota and thence to Carthagena. His 
labors in South America, beset with opposition of the priesthood and revolu- 
tionary difficulties, were necessarily of a pioneer character; but his faithful in- 
struction and his translation of schoolbooks and of the New Testament into 
Spanish prepared the way for the long and fruitful service in Valparaiso of 
Rev. David Trumbull, whom Mr. Wheelwright was the means of inducing to 
begin mission work there, and who was for several years a member of his fam- 
ily. For the last four years of his life he was confined to his bed with paralysis, 
but the annual messages from his home at the time of our Alumni meetings al- 
ways spoke of his delight in hearing his attendant read to him " from the Bible, 
from Cowper's Hymns, Pilgrim's Progress, Watts's and Select Hymns, and 
occasionally from Baxter's Saints'' Rest and Owen on Forgiveness." In his last 
conscious moments he repeated, " O, receive my soul at last," and so passed 
awav. 

His old friend, Rev. E. G. Parsons (Class of 1837), writes of Mr. Wheel- 
wright: " He was specially remarkable for his public spirit. He was always 
ready to take hold of any enterprise which promised to promote the general 
welfare, especially if it pertained to the education of the young. His religion 
dominated in all things. He lived for others and not for himself — God's 
steward of the property intrusted to him, which he felt bound to employ as 
God would have him do." Rev. George L. Gleason (Class of 1864), Mr. Wheel- 
wright's pastor for several years, says of him: " Mr. Wheelwright was a mod- 
est, shrinking man ; but he was not a useless man, nor was his education wasted. 
As a teacher he was very successful. His greatest usefulness lay along the line 
of education. He was a liberal supporter of Dummer Academy. It was through 
his influence that the old Byfield Female Seminary, the oldest in the State, was 
revived. For several years he supported an experienced teacher and furnished 
free instruction to the youth of Byfield. He did more than any other person in 
the parish for the support of the gospel, and was a liberal giver to every good 
cause. Up to extreme old age he was a delightful companion, being a great 
conversationalist. He was a conservative theologian, but charitable in his judg- 
ment of others. Though never a preacher of the gospel, his theological studies 
were a great blessing to the Church and the world." 

Mr. Wheelwright was married, October 27, 1842, to Sarah Dana, of New- 
buryport, Mass., daughter of Rev. Dr. Daniel Dana and Sarah Emery. She 
died April 27, 1856. He married, second, Adaline Adams, of Byfield, daughter 
of Stephen Adams and Mary Anne Longfellow. She survived him only a few 
months, dying January 20, 1896. He had three sons and seven daughters. 
Two sons and five daughters are living. One of the sons has been a recent 
student in this Seminary, and one of the daughters is the wife of the Byfield 
pastor, Rev. David C. Torrey. 

Mr. Wheelwright died of old age, at Byfield, Mass., July 14, 1895, aged 
ninety-three years, nine months, and twenty-seven days. 



182 

CLASS OF 1826. 

Louis McDonald. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Joseph McDonald and Amanda Beach ; born in Middlebury, Vt., 
January, 1S01 ; fitted for college at Addison County Grammar School; gradu- 
ated at Middlebury College, 1823 ; confirmed in St. Stephen's Church, Middle- 
bury, October, 1823; studied in this Seminary, 1823-24, afterwards under Rev. 
Benjamin B. Smith, subsequently Bishop of Kentucky ; ordained deacon in the 
Episcopal Church by Bishop Griswold, October 23, 1825; as priest, October 10, 
1S27, at Shelburne, Vt. He officiated as deacon at Rutland, Vt., 1826-27 ; as 
rector at Shelburne, Vt., 1827-1834; at Berkshire, Montgomery, and Enosburgh, 
Vt., 1S34-37; at Sheldon, Vt., 1837-40; at Cambridge and Eden, Vt, 1840-41 ; 
at Wells, Vt., 1S42-43. While at Wells his mind became unsettled, and from 
September 17, 1844, he was an inmate of the Vermont Asylum at Brattleboro, 
Vt., until his death. All his means were invested in bonds, which were stolen 
by burglars from a safe in Middlebury several years ago, and his maintenance 
was afterwards provided for by the diocesan fund for aged and infirm clergymen. 
He received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from the University of Ver- 
mont in 1S28. 

He married Elizabeth Bissell, of Middlebury, daughter of David Bissell and 
Heart Wickham, of Pomfret, Ct. She died June 19, 1853. Their only daugh- 
ter, Charlotte McDonald, died at Burlington, N. J., where she was attending 
school, July 5, 1848, at the age of twenty years. 

Mr. McDonald died of old age, at Brattleboro, Vt., June 16, 1895, aged 
ninety-four years and five months. 



CLASS OF 1827. 

Edward Beecher, D.D. {A r on-graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Lyman Beecher, D.D., and Roxana Foote ; born in East 
Hampton, L. I., August 27, 1803; prepared for college at South Farms Acad- 
emy, Litchfield, Ct. ; graduated at Yale College, 1822, Berkeley Scholar and 
valedictorian ; teacher of languages in Grammar School, Hartford, Ct., 1822-24; 
studied in this Seminary, 1824-25; tutor, Yale College, 1825-26; licensed to 
preach by the New Haven West Association, February 7, 1826 ; ordained pas- 
tor of Park Street Church, Boston, December 27, 1826, remaining four years; 
president of Illinois College, Jacksonville, 111., 1830-44; pastor of Salem Street 
Church, Boston, 1844-55; pastor of First Congregational Church, Galesburg, 
111., 1855-71 ; resided after in Brooklyn, N. Y., acting as pastor of the Parkville 
Mission Church in the suburbs of that city, 1884-89. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Marietta College in 1841. While at Galesburg he 
delivered courses of lectures on Church Institutions in Chicago Theological 
Seminary. He was associated with other prominent ministers in founding the 
Congregationalist in 1849, and was for four years its senior editor. He was 
afterwards for some time on the editorial staff of the Christian Union. In 
addition to numerous contributions to the Biblical Repository, the Bibliotheca 
Sacra, the Indepe7idenl, and other periodicals, he published History of the Alton 
Riots; Import and Mode of Baptism ; Conflict of Ages ; The Papal Conspiracy ; 
Concord of Ages ; History of Scriptural Doctrine of Retribution. 



i83 

Dr. Keecher's long life was one of remarkable activity and usefulness. His 
preaching and personal efforts while a tutor in New Haven are said to have 
produced a marked reformation in the college. He brought forth fruit in his 
old age by his earnest service for the Parkville Church, to which he returned 
after the crushing of a leg in a railroad accident when he was eighty- six 
years old. 

Professor Park, of Andover, furnishes the following tribute: "I heard of 
Mr. Edward Beecher for the first time in September, 1822. At this time I lis- 
tened to the conversation- of Dr. Joel Hawes, of Hartford, and Mr. Solomon 
Stoddard, afterward known as a Latin grammarian. These gentlemen had just 
returned from Yale College Commencement and were enthusiastic in their praise 
of the young man who had pronounced the Valedictory Addresses on that occa- 
sion. They spoke of him as bearing a striking resemblance to his father, and 
giving promise of becoming a second Lyman Beecher in the pulpit. I next 
heard of him in 1828 as the pastor of Park Street Church in Boston. His ad- 
vent to that pastorate was hailed with great joy. It was known that his father, 
and also his mother, possessed rare genius ; that in his boyhood he had been 
acquainted with many eminent clergymen, and in his early manhood had been 
intimate with some well-trained students in the Litchfield Law School; that he 
had been in the habit of conducting theological debates with his father, who 
was called the prince of New England preachers. It was also known that 
while a student at Andover he had been intimate with Prof. Moses Stuart, and, 
like Prof. Edward Robinson and President Jasper Adams, had felt the inspira- 
tion of Stuart's familiar talks. 

M He was only twenty -five years of age when he assumed the pastorate of 
the church which had been signalized by the ministry of Dr. Edward Dorr 
Griffin. He was too young for an office so responsible. Some of his discourses 
were highly intellectual and gave him the reputation of being well fitted for 
some place in a literary institution. At this time the presidency of Illinois Col- 
lege was offered to him. His acceptance of it was regarded as a highly auspi- 
cious event. The college was in its infancy, was surrounded with enemies, and 
needed a president who united an intrepid spirit with solid learning. The State 
of Illinois was in danger of becoming a pro-slavery State. It needed a man of 
high literary reputation for the presidency of its new college. Mr. Beecher 
proved himself to be the man. He became conspicuous in opposing the influ- 
ence of pro-slavery politicians. With great boldness he defended the course of 
the martyr Lovejoy. It has been said that his political influence in Illinois was 
one means of preparing the Illinois voters to sustain Abraham Lincoln as a 
candidate for the presidency of the republic. It is known that his zeal for the 
anti-slavery cause enlisted the sympathies of his sister, Mrs. Stowe, in the same 
cause, then so unpopular. 

" He performed an important service in elevating the standard of collegiate 
education in several of our Western States. While president of Illinois Col- 
lege he was sent, with a few presidents of other Western colleges, to the city of 
New York in order to awaken new interest in the cause of education and to 
adopt new measures for transmitting the gifts of Eastern philanthropists to 
Western beneficiaries. One result of this visit was the formation of the Col- 
lege Society, the influence of which is well known. In originating this society 
Dr. Beecher was a conspicuous agent. After his return from Illinois to Boston 
he continued to stand up in the pulpit as a man of rugged form, uttering rugged 



1 84 

truths in a rugged style. He struck hard blows in defense of the Edwardean 
theology. He was an enthusiastic friend of the Bibliotheca Sacra, and wrote 
some vigorous articles for it over his own name. It ought here to be stated 
that, although in many respects he was equal, if not superior, to his honored 
father, he was not so in all respects. The father had defined eloquence to be 
'logic on fire.' Some later publications of the son were specimens of fire on 
logic. Still, he was commonly acknowledged to be a learned scholar, a virile 
logician, a profound thinker, a forceful man, sincere, earnest, and deeply 
religious." 

Dr. Beecher was married, October 27, 1829, to Isabella Porter Jones, of 
Portland, Me., daughter of Enoch Jones and Paulina Porter. She survived him 
for a few months, dying November 15, 1895. Of their eleven children, three 
only are living. Eugene F. Beecher, Yale, 1867, is a journalist in New York 
City, and Frederick W. Beecher, of Williams College and Chicago Seminary, 
an Episcopal clergyman in Angelica, N. Y. 

Dr. Beecher died of old age, at Brooklyn, N. Y., July 28, 1895, a S ec * 
ninety-one years, eleven months, and one day. 



GLASS OF 1832. 

Samuel Francis Smith, D.D. 

Son of Samuel Smith and Sarah Bryant; born in Boston (at the North End, 
near the historic Christ Church), October 21, 1808; prepared for college at 
Boston Latin School ; graduated at Harvard College, 1829 (in the same class 
with Judges George T. Bigelow and Benjamin R. Curtis, Dr. James Freeman 
Clarke, Dr. Chandler Robbins, Prof. , Benjamin Peirce, and Oliver Wendell 
Holmes); took the full course in this Seminary, 1829-32. He was editor of 
the Baptist Missionary Magazine in Boston, 1832-33; ordained pastor of the 
First Baptist Church, Waterville, Me., February 12, 1834, and continuing there 
till 1842; professor of Modern Languages in Waterville College, now Colby 
University, 1834-41 ; pastor of First Baptist Church, Newton, Mass., 1842-54, 
and editor of Christian Review, 1842-48 ; afterwards editorial secretary of the 
American Baptist Missionary Union for fifteen years, continuing his residence 
in Newton until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Waterville College in 
1853, and was a member of its Board of Trustees, 1840-60. He published Life 
of Rev. Joseph Grafton, Missionary Sketches, History of Newton, Mass., and 
Rambles in Mission Fields. He was compiler of Lyric Gems, The Juvenile 
Lyre, and, with Rev. Baron Stow, of The Psalmist, the widely used hymn book 
of his denomination, which contained nearly thirty hymns of his own composi- 
tion. He wrote in his Seminary room (6 Phillips Hall) the missionary hymns, 
"Yes, My Native Land, I Love Thee " and " The Morning Light is Breaking," 
the latter having been translated into many languages. His most famous pro- 
duction, "America," long ago adopted as a national hymn and sung in time of 
war and in time of peace all over our own country and in other lands, was writ- 
ten at Andover in his room at Mrs. Hitchings', now Mrs. Blunt's, in Febru- 
ary, 1832. 

The last survivor of his Seminary classmates, Rev. Elias Riggs, D.D., a 
lifelong missionary of the American Board, writes from Constantinople: "I 



i8 5 

have today received your letter announcing the sudden death, or rather trans- 
lation, of my beloved classmate and friend, Dr. Samuel Francis Smith. I count 
it one of the distinguished privileges of my very pleasant Seminary course at 
Andover that I was permitted to know and love him. We two were among the 
youngest members of the Class of 1832, myself the youngest member of all. 
I presume that no other two members formed and maintained so intimate an 
acquaintance and friendship as did we while in the Seminary. Our difference 
of denomination did not prevent our free and earnest discussion on our daily 
walks of the deeply interesting topics which came before us in the classroom. 
Together also we engaged in extra studies, especially in dialects cognate with 
the Hebrew and Chaldee of the Old Testament. Brother Smith was one of 
the last to part from me and my wife when we embarked at Boston for Greece 
in 1832 in a little brig of only one hundred and eighty tons. After nearly a half 
century of varied experiences we were permitted to meet again in Constantinople 
in October, 1SS1, on the return of Dr. and Mrs. Smith from their visits to the 
Burmah and Telugu missions. May I be permitted to meet him again in the 
'better land! ' Others can speak better than I can of his public career. It is 
my privilege to speak of a warm and uninterrupted personal attachment, begun 
before the writing of 'My Country, 'tis of Thee ' or 'The Morning Light is 
Breaking ' and continuing through life." 

Rev. Daniel L. Furber, D.D. (Class of 1846), for nearly fifty years Dr. 
Smith's neighbor at Newton, writes of him : " Dr. Smith held responsible posi- 
tions as pastor, editor, or professor for thirty-six years. After that his facile 
pen was always busy, and he wrote books, reviews, and an uncounted number 
of articles for the daily and weekly newspapers, some of which were transla- 
tions from the German, French, and Swedish. He was an adept in linguistic 
study, and could read with considerable readiness twelve or fifteen languages. 
In conversation he had a ready command of language, a retentive memory, and 
a large store of general information enlivened with anecdote. He was a lover 
of the beauties of the natural world, and often used them in his writings to illus- 
trate spiritual truth. His patriotism is known to all. Hymns and poems were 
written by him during the war and on patriotic occasions ever since. The lyr- 
ical quality of his verse, whether patriotic or religious, and the marriage of his 
best hymns to suitable tunes redoubled their usefulness and helped them to 
their world-wide popularity. In his journey to the far East he heard them sung 
in many languages at many missionary stations. The last year of his life gave 
him the consummate satisfaction of seeing how warmly he was appreciated as 
the author of our national hymn. His mental activity continued to the last, 
and while on his way to preach in a neighboring town he was suddenly and 
painlessly called to sing ' The Morning Light is Breaking' in another and a 
brighter world." 

Dr. Smith was married, September 16, 1834, to Mary White Smith, of 
Haverhill, Mass., daughter of Jonathan Kimball Smith and Ann White, and 
granddaughter of Rev. Dr. Hezekiah Smith, a chaplain in Washington's army. 
She survives him, with five of their nine children, three sons and two daugh- 
ters. The eldest son, Samuel F. Smith, is a lawyer in Davenport, Io., and 
Rev. Dr. Daniel A. W. Smith is president of the Baptist Theological Seminary 
in Burmah. 

Dr. Smith died of heart disease in Boston, November 16, 1895, aged 
eighty-seven years and twenty- five days. 



1 86 
GLASS OP 1833. 

James Radcliffe Davenport, D.D. {Non- graduate) 

Son of John Alfred Davenport and Eliza Maria Wheeler; born in Stam- 
ford, Ct., November 15, 1812; prepared for college at Borland and Forest's 
School in Stamford, his mother having commenced his instruction in Latin 
when he was eight years old ; took his freshman year in Columbia College, and 
graduated at Yale College, 1830; studied in this Seminary, 1830-31, and in Yale 
Divinity School, 1832-33; tutor, Yale College, 1833-35; licensed by the New 
Haven West Association, April 16, 1834. He was ordained by Bedford (N.Y.) 
Presbytery, October 13, 1836, and was pastor of the Presbyterian Church at 
Rye, N. Y., 1836-38; of the Congregational Church at Francestown, N. H., 
1839-42; and of the Presbyterian Church at Cazenovia, N. Y. , 1842-46. He 
was ordained deacon in the Episcopal Church, December 19, 1847 > priest, 
March 4, 1849; rector of Grace Church, Albany, N. Y., 1849-57, being also in 
temporary charge of St. John's Church at Christiansted, Vera Cruz, for six 
months in 1857; rector of St. Anne's Church, Annapolis, Md., 1858-67; in 
Europe, 1865-67; resided afterwards in New York City until his death, but 
served as assistant rector for a time at the Church of the Heavenly Rest and 
at St. Paul's Church; was rector of St. Mary's Church, Mott Haven, 1878-83; 
officiated one year, 1883-84, at the Church of the Holy Innocents, where he 
preached his last sermon, May 24, 1884. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Columbia College in 
1878. He was one of the Examining Board of the General Theological Semi- 
nary and Secretary of the Clergymen's Retiring Fund Society. The following 
is from a tribute written for the Churchman by Bishop Henry C. Potter : 
11 There are parishes in the city of New York which, at critical periods in their 
history, were mainly indebted to his wise and unselfish devotion for their con- 
tinued existence. To such a mind for service Dr. Davenport united a love of 
good learning, a clear and well-defined knowledge of the faith and order of 
which he had been put in trust, and culture both varied and discriminating. 
The books that he had read he remembered; the teachers at whose feet he 
most loved to sit he had sufficiently mastered ; and he held to his convictions 
with quiet but decided tenacity. Of a naturally devout temper, the atmosphere 
in which he lived was that of a chastened reverence, and, full of all kindly dis- 
positions himself, he made it easy for his brethren to respect and love him." 

Dr. Davenport was married, September 7, 1836, to Mehitabel Woodward 
Newell, of Boston, Mass., daughter of Ebenezer Newell and Anna Whiting, of 
Natick. She survives him, with two daughters and one son, the oldest son 
having deceased. 

Dr. Davenport died of pneumonia, in New York City, April 13, 1896, aged 
eighty-three years, four months, and twenty-eight days. 

GLASS OF 1834. 

Daniel Smith Talcott, D.D. 

Son of Daniel Smith and Abigail Jewett (his name having been changed 
from Daniel Talcott Smith in 1864) ; born in Newburyport, Mass., March 7, 
1813; fitted for college with Amos Pettingell (a graduate of Phillips Academy 



i8 7 

in 1S21) and Alfred W. Pike; graduated at Amherst College, 1831 ; studied 
theology in this Seminary; licensed by Essex North Association, March 12, 
1834; was Abbot Resident, 1834-36; assistant to Professor Stuart in Hebrew^ 
1833-36. He was ordained, December 7, 1836, at Sherborn, Mass., and was 
pastor there, 1836-3S, until called to the professorship of Sacred Literature in 
Bangor Theological Seminary, which he filled until 1881 — a period of forty- 
two years — residing afterwards at Bangor without charge. 

Professor Talcott received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Water- 
ville College (now Colby University) in 1S53, and from Bowdoin College in 
1858. His publications were a sermon before the Maine Missionary Society in 
1857, a memorial sermon prefixed to the sermons of Professor Shepard, one of 
the Boston Lectures on Skepticism, 187 1, and several articles in the American 
edition of Smith's Dictionary of the Bible. Prof. Egbert C. Smyth, of Andover 
Seminary, furnishes this tribute : " Professor Talcott was my teacher in Hebrew 
and New Testament Greek. He had a clear, candid, well-trained, and thor- 
oughly informed mind. He was patient and faithful. I recall with especial 
gratitude the pains he took in Biblical interpretation to train his pupils to 
study a verse or clause in its connection and setting. The meaning of words, 
the construction of clauses and sentences, were duly regarded, but everything 
ma looked at, if possible, in its relation to the course of thought. He was 
kind enough to meet some of us, in one of the students' rooms, for special and 
voluntary work on one of St. Paul's Epistles. He was as minute and exact in 
grammatical examination as Meyer, but what I have just emphasized stands out 
in memory, and has been of lifelong benefit. He was an accomplished scholar 
and superior instructor. His interpretation of Scripture was candid, thorough, 
spiritual. He had, in all relations, the confidence and high esteem of his 
pupils." 

Prof. Francis B. Denio, D.D., of Bangor Seminary (Class of 1879), writes : 
"It fell to my lot to meet Professor Talcott in 1879, two years before his re- 
tirement from his work as teacher of Exegesis in this Seminary. From the 
first day that I met him to the last he was all kindness and helpfulness as well 
as courtesy. The thorough scholarship and candor of thought which he always 
manifested were a source of pleasure. There was ever a certain readiness to 
see the other side of subjects, which was, perhaps, due to the long balancing 
of evidence of difficult questions, and which prevented him from taking a par- 
tisan view of any question presented to him. No subject of thought within the 
domain of theology was without interest to him. Indeed, in his later years it 
would seem that the mental activities, which had been more or less confined to 
one channel, now took opportunity to follow freely in every direction in which 
the religious thought of our time has been moving. As he approached the end, 
these questions which are stirred by the near prospect of entrance into another 
life seemed to attract his especial attention, and when I last met him I could 
not but believe that the stress with which some of the problems pressed upon 
him would soon pass away. His death, in the fullness of age and nearly fifteen 
years after his active life had ceased, and at a time when physical feebleness 
had greatly circumscribed his enjoyment, did not bring the profound regret that 
it would have done had he still been in the fullness of vigor; rather it has 
brought a feeling of gratitude that he has passed from the limitations of this 
life to a life of clearer vision." 



i88 

The following is quoted from an article in the Bangor Whig and Courier 
by Rev. George W. Field, D.D., of Bangor: " Professor Talcott was not a mere 
scholar of words ; he was a thinker also to an extent of which few have any 
idea. The writer of this heard from his lips more than forty years ago every 
important and essential truth of the New Theology of today. If the feeble 
health with which he always struggled, his excessive duties as a teacher of 
the two great languages of the religious world, his fastidious taste, never sat- 
isfied with his work, together with a natural reserve and shrinking from pub- 
licity, had not conspired to prevent it, he might have given to the public in his 
prime books which would not only have secured to him reputation, but which 
would have done no little (we cannot help thinking) towards molding the 
thought of his generation." 

He was married, April 22, 1840, to Sophia Hammond Brown, of Bangor, 
daughter of Dea. George Washington Brown and Sophia Hammond. She died 
April 1, 1866. They had two sons, one dying in infancy and the other in 1888, 
and two daughters, who survive. 

Professor Talcott died of acute bronchitis, in Bangor, Me., January 19, 1896, 
aged eighty-two years, ten months, and twelve days. 



CLASS OF 1835. 
William Chamberlain Jackson. 

Son of Daniel Jackson and Abigail Merrill ; born in Eaton, now Madison, 
N. H., February 17, 1808 ; prepared for college at the academies in Hebron, Me., 
and Haverhill, N. H. ; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1831 ; taught one year 
at the academy at Westminster, Mass.; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1832-35. He was ordained at Lancaster, N. H., October 14, 1835, and was in 
the missionary service of the American Board among the Armenians at Trebi- 
zond and Erzroom in Turkey until 1845. He was pastor in Lincoln, Mass., 
1848-58; Dunstable, Mass., 1858-67; without charge, South Acton, Mass., 
1868-70; acting pastor, Brentwood, N. H., 1870-82; resided there, without 
charge, until 1891, and from 1891 in Newton, Mass. 

Rev. George E. Street, of Exeter, N. H. (Class of 1863), writes of him: 
"Mr. Jackson was a scholar and thinker in his tastes and habit and a writer 
above the average; a critic of keen, analytical turn of mind, yet candid in his 
treatment of an opponent ; a devout spirit, who walked in the high places of 
religious communion while filling humblest spheres of duty. Often weighed 
down by protracted illness in his family, he kept sweet, and bore his heavy 
burdens without murmuring, with a gentleness and patience that showed the 
fineness of his nature and the strength of his faith." 

He was married, September 9, 1835, to Mary Almira Sawyer, of West- 
minster, Mass., daughter of Jacob Sawyer and Mary Rice. She survives him, 
with two sons and four daughters, two children having died in infancy and a 
daughter after her graduation from Abbot Academy. One son is a master in 
the Boston Latin School, and one daughter the wife of Prof. James B. Taylor, 
of the Class of 187 1. 

Mr. Jackson died of pneumonia, in Newton, Mass., October 17, 1895, aged 
eighty-seven years and eight months. 



1 89 

Ezekiel Russell, D.D. 

Son of Benjamin Hills Russell and Lydia Tilden ; born in South Wilbraham, 
. March 12, 1805; prepared for college at Monson (Mass.) Academy and 
under Rev. William S. Burt, of Amherst; entered the sophomore class at 
Amherst College, and graduated in 1829; teacher in Monson Academy, 1829-30; 
principal of Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass., 1830-31 ; tutor, Amherst Col- 
lege, 1831-32 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1832-35; licensed to preach 
by the Andover Association, meeting with the Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, April 
16, 1835. He was ordained pastor over the church in North Adams, Mass., 
June 22, 1S36, and remained there until 1839; pastor of Olivet Church, Spring- 
field, Mass., 1839-40: pastor of church in East Randolph, Mass., 1850-57; pas- 
tor of Winthrop Church, East Randolph, now Holbrook, Mass., 1857-72; re- 
sided afterwards, without charge, in Holbrook, and from 1887 in Lynn, Mass., 
with his daughter, Mrs. Charles A. Coffin. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst College in 
1858. He was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society 
and a scholarly contributor to religious periodicals. Rev. Dr. J. W. Wellman, 
of Maiden (Class of 1S50), sends this tribute: "Dr. Russell was by the very 
instincts and drift of his mind a scholar. He delighted in scholarly pursuits. 
His study and his library were his joy. He did not confine himself to any one 
department of study or learning. College presidents knew that he kept himself 
up in the college curriculum, and often sent students to him for a time, several 
of whom during his pastorate in Holbrook he took through all the required 
studies of a college year. He read habitually, for the mere pleasure of it, his 
favorite Latin and Greek classics up to within a few weeks of his death. Dr. 
Russell was an able theologian, and his theology was comprehensive, Scriptural, 
and Christian. He was pestered by no text that would not harmonize with his 
religious beliefs. He never boasted that he knew how to get rid of all Scrip- 
tures which contradicted his theology. Not for a moment would he hold any 
theological tenet that was In conflict with the plain declarations of God's Word. 
His faith in the divine authority of the Holy Scriptures was profound and im- 
movable. He was a great lover of righteousness. He dwelt much upon the 
absolute and eternal righteousness of God and, by way of contrast, upon the 
indescribable wickedness of sin. He was a great lover of the gospel of Christ, 
accepting with grateful wonder and joy the gospel revelation of the full and 
absolute reconciliation of God to penitent sinners, and preaching these glad tid- 
ings with such downright sincerity and passionate earnestness that many of his 
hearers were deeply convicted of sin and afterwards gave evidence that they 
were saved from their sins. He was not only an ardent lover of righteousness 
and of the gospel of Christ, but also and chiefly of Christ himself, the personal 
Christ. He loved greatly and tenderly his own family, his kindred, his friends, 
and with a pastor's love all the people in the three parishes in which he minis- 
tered ; but above all he loved Christ, and it was his supreme joy to live for him 
and serve him in ' the ministry of reconciliation.' " 

Dr. Russell was married, July 13, 1836, to Louisa Storrs Billings, of Con- 
way, Mass., daughter of Elisha Billings, Esq., and Mary Storrs. She died March 
18, 1887. He had one son, who died in childhood, and two daughters. 

Dr. Russell died of congestion of the brain, at Lynn, Mass., February 26, 
1896, aged ninety years, eleven months, and fourteen days. 



Nathaniel Beach. 



190 

CLASS OF 1836. 



Son of Dea. Samuel Beach and Lurana Axtell; born in Mendham, N. J., 
October 5, 1809; prepared for college at Bloomfield (N. J.) Academy; gradu- 
ated at Williams College, 1832 ; taught one year in Pittsfield, Mass. ; took the 
full course in this Seminary, 1833-36; licensed to preach by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, April 5, 1836 ; ordained, 
November 22, 1837, as pastor of the church in Millbury, Mass., where he re- 
mained for twenty years; pastor in Little Compton, R. I., 1857-67; without 
charge, although preaching several months in Princeton, Mass., 1867-68; act- 
ing pastor at Woodstock, Ct., 1868-78, and of Second Church, Mansfield, Ct., 
1878-84; without charge, Chaplin, Ct., 1884-89, and from 1889, Norwich 
Town, Ct. 

Mr. Beach published one sermon, Neglect of Parental Duty and Its Results. 
Rev. S. G. Buckingham, D.D., of Springfield, Mass., writes: "Mr. Beach was 
settled by my side in Millbury some ten years, during which time we had the 
principal charge of the public schools. He was a modest, wise, conscientious, 
Christian minister. He had the entire confidence and affection of his people 
and ministerial brethren, and had a very successful pastorate. He was one of 
those pastors to whom New England has been so much indebted, one who 
said to himself, 'This one thing I do,' following the 'lost sheep,' and always 
pretty sure to bring it home rejoicing — a brief memorial of a parish minister 
who was satisfied with this and has gone to receive his reward. Brother Beach 
was very dear to us. ' He served his own generation by the will of God, fell on 
sleep, and was laid unto his fathers.' " 

Mr. Beach was married, October n, 1837, to Elizabeth Rogers Jackson, of 
Dorset, Vt., daughter of Rev. William Jackson, D.D., and Susanna Cram. She 
died January 9, 1870. He married, second, December 2, 1875, Mrs. Maria 
Lyman Haskell, daughter of Dr. Daniel Lyman and Frances Mary Eldredge, 
of Woodstock, Ct., and widow of Dea. George Haskell, of Rochester, Mass. 
She survived her husband but a few weeks, dying January 9, 1896. An only 
son died in 1872. An only daughter, Elizabeth Rogers Beach, a former student 
and teacher in Abbot Academy, was a devoted missionary worker in the McAll 
Mission, both in France and in America, and perished in the wreck of the City 
of Columbus in January, 1884. 

Mr. Beach died of old age, at Norwich Town, Ct, November 3, 1895, aged 
eighty-six years and twenty-eight days. 



GLASS OF 1837. 

John Humphrey Avery. 

Son of Elisha Avery and Sybil (Avery) Stiles (his mother being the widow 
of a son of President Stiles, of Yale College) ; born in Boston, July 22, 1807 ; 
fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1827-29, and was the valedic- 
torian of his class; studied one year at Yale College, two years at Amherst Col- 
lege, and graduated at Union College, 1834; took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1834-37, and remained as resident licentiate, 1837-38, having been licensed 
by the Andover Association, meeting with Professor Emerson, Andover, April 11, 



191 

He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Harwich Mass 
August 8, 1838, and remained there six months. He was installed o'ver the 
Robinson Society in Plymouth, Mass., April 24, 1839, but after about a year he 
changed his views upon the subject of baptism, preached for a short time in the 
Baptist Church at Plymouth, was pastor of the Baptist Church at Danvers 
Mass., 1841-43, and supplied a church of the same denomination at South 
Boston, 1843-44. Losing his voice, he resided, without charge, at Plymouth 
1844-46, and on a fruit farm in Freehold, N. J., 1846-49. He taught a select 
school in New Holland, Pa., 1849-50, preaching also in the Dutch Reformed 
Church, having become dissatisfied with " the close communion idea." He 
taught a short time in Ephrata, Pa., and supplied the Congregational Church 
at Austinburgh, Ohio, 1850-53, remaining there one more year, without charge. 
He then left the ministry and devoted himself to the study of anatomy and 
physiology, lecturing upon the "Laws of Life " in various schools and colleges, 
and having his residence at North East, Pa., Conneaut and Amboy, Ohio. 

From 1890 he lived with his son at Cleveland, Ohio, but maintained a re- 
markable vigor of body and mind. He received the honorary degree of Master 
of Arts from Brown University in 1S41. Several of his sermons were published 
in early life, and a small volume of poems written after he was eighty years 
old. A gentleman who knew him well says: "Mr. Avery was a superior 
classical scholar, having a remarkably quick and retentive memory, possessed 
more than ordinary rhetorical and oratorical power, but was a radical in all his 
opinions, anti-slavery, evolution, vegetarianism, etc., occupying his attention, 
and not always well-balanced in judgment." 

He was married, October 10, 1839, to Harriet Gray Whitmore, of Plym- 
outh, Mass., daughter of Rev. Benjamin Whitmore and Mary Gray. She died 
August 26, 1851, and he married, second, October, 1856, Emily Booth, of 
Hamptonburgh, X. V., daughter of George Booth and Susan Tuthill. She died 
December 26, 1S83. Of seven children, two only are living, a son and a daugh- 
ter, the former a counselor at law in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mr. Avery died of old age, in Cleveland, Ohio, May 25, 1895, a g e d eighty- 
seven years, ten months, and three days. 

William Symmes Coggin, D D. 

Son of Rev. Jacob Coggin and Man- Symmes; grandson of Mr. Jacob 
Coggin, Harvard College, 1763, an unordained preacher; born November 27, 
1S12. in Tewksbury, Mass., where his father was minister for forty-eight years; 
prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1827-30; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1S34 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1S34-37 ; 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Prof. Ralph 
Emerson, D.D., at Andover, April 11, 1837 ; ordained over the church in Box- 
ford, Mass., May 9, 1838, and continued in that relation for thirty years. He 
continued to reside afterwards in Boxford, but was acting pastor of the church 
in Byfield. Mass., 1869-75. He was for many years an efficient member of the 
School Board of the town and represented it in the legislature in 1879. He re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Dartmouth College in 1S94. A 
sermon preached on the twenty-fifth anniversary of his settlement was published. 

Rev. Samuel H. Emery, D.D., of Taunton, Mass., a Seminary classmate, 



192 

writes: " My remembrance of William S. Coggin runs back to the days of our 
boyhood in Phillips Academy, Andover. The son of a most excellent Congre- 
gational minister in the town of Tewksbury, he seemed to be one of the boys 
born and reared to prove the assertion false that ministers' sons are always wild 
and bad. Never was a better boy than this one — amiable, lovely, and in every 
way excellent, a favorite in the schoolroom and on the street. In Andover 
Seminary he was a faithful, conscientious student, beloved by professors and 
classmates. Unambitious, satisfied to serve the Master in smaller fields of 
labor, no doubt he has heard the Christ whom he loved say, ' Well done, good 
and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.' " 

Rev. Francis E. Clark, D.D., of Auburndale (Class of 1876), said in the 
Congregationalist: "The denomination has lost one of the truest-hearted and 
most single-minded of our ministers. A singular sweetness and charm of his 
character was acknowledged by all of his friends. Kindly, gentle, courtly in 
his character, he won to himself and to the Master whom he served those who 
came within the circle of his influence. Under all circumstances and through- 
out his long life he was ever the ideal Christian gentleman." 

Rev. Emery L. Bradford, of Boxford (Class of 1892), adds this tribute : 
" I knew Dr. Coggin only during the last years of his life. He left a deep im- 
press on the life of this community. Here, in this little place, he massed all 
his influence, and, as I have had occasion to say in another connection, ' He 
was a quick and tender conscience to every household in all this parish.' Every 
home is richer because he lived here. One characteristic thing was his constant 
helpfulness to his successors in the pastorate. To every one he was a tower of 
strength. I, as a young minister, owe him a debt of gratitude I can never re- 
pay. To the very end the church he loved and to which he gave his life filled 
a large part of his thought and influence. His last days were full of the great- 
est peace, and yet of eagerness to go home. He has left behind a blessed mem- 
ory, and being dead he speaks to us day by day." 

Dr. Coggin was married, August 6, 1840, to Mary Clark, of Tewksbury, 
daughter of Dea. Oliver Clark and Nancy Huse. 

He died of paralysis of the throat, at Boxford, Mass., September 10, 1895, 
aged eighty-two years, nine months, and thirteen days. 



Josiah Bartlett Clark. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Levi Clark and Love Wiggin ; born in Stratham, N.H., January 
10, 1808; prepared for college at Hampton (N. H.) Academy; studied two years 
at Dartmouth College, and graduated at Middlebury College, 1834; studied in 
this Seminary, 1834-35 ; graduated at Lane Seminary, 1837. He was ordained 
by the Presbytery of Cincinnati, January 22, 1839, and preached successively at 
Rising Sun, Ind., 1838-40; Sharon, Vt., 1840-42; Eliot, Me., 1842-45; West 
Randolph, Vt, 1846; Pittsfield, Vt, 1846-50; Clarendon, Vt., 1851-56; Rupert, 
Vt., 1857-69; Pittsfield, Vt., 1869-73; Weathersfield Centre, Vt., 1874-75; with- 
out charge, Ludlow, Vt., 1876-86, preaching there, 1880-81 ; afterwards residing 
in Islington and, from 1891, in Ellis, Mass. 

Mr. Clark is described as having been a faithful minister in his various 
pastorates, and to have been a very devout and exemplary disciple of the Master 
whom he preached. Rev. Charles Beecher, of Georgetown, Mass., who was a 



193 

classmate of Mr. Clark at Lane Seminary, sends a brief note about him, which 
looks forward as well as backward : " I remember Clark very well, especially as 
a genial friend and a good musician. We sung together a great deal, both 
sacred music and glees. The memory of those days is filled with a mournful 
pleasure, although mournful is hardly the right word. But all are gone that 
I knew — classmates, associates, professors. 'I feel like one who treads alone 
some banquet hall deserted.' But this ought not to be the feeling. Those 
teachers — father, Allen, Stowe— those classmates — Henry Ward, Hastings, 
Clark — those sweet songsters have all left this world, but they have entered on 
a higher, nobler, more glorious mode of being." 

Mr. Clark was married in 1S39 to Mary M. Linsley, of Middlebury, Vt., 
who died in April, 1840. He married, second, May 11, 1841, in Hanover, N. H., 
Louisa E. Stone, daughter of Mark and Mary Stone. She died January 19, 
1852. He married, third, October 19, 1852, at West' Bloomfield, N. J., Sarah 
Stone, sister of his second wife. She died May 10, 1870, and he married, fourth, 
November 4, 1870, Mrs. Julia Delight Have, of Rupert, Vt, daughter of Calvin 
and Delight Gookin. Of six children three are living. 

Mr. Clark died of old age, at West Dedham, Mass., March 3, 1896, aged 
eighty-eight years, one month, and twenty-three days. 



Thomas Douglas. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Robert Douglas and Abiah Douglas; born in Waterford, Ct., 
March 29, 1807 ; prepared for college at Hamilton (N. Y.) Academy ; gradu- 
ated at Vale College, 183 1 ; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1833-34, and in 
this Seminar}-, 1834-36; licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Prof. Ralph Emerson at Andover, April n, 1837. Before commencing theo- 
logical study he had taught in Brooklyn and Norwich, Ct., and in 1836 resumed 
that work at New London, Ct., having charge of the "Union School " there 
until 1844. For the benefit of his health he then took a voyage on a whale 
ship, arriving at the Sandwich Islands in March, 1845. He remained there for 
about two years as assistant to Mr. Amos S. Cooke, of the American Board's 
Mission, in a school attended by the children of the royal family. In 1847 he 
landed on his return home in San Francisco, but not having strength for the 
horseback journey across the continent with General Kearny and others, he 
remained in San Francisco, and is said to have been the first American teacher 
in that city. When gold was discovered his scholars all went to the mines and 
he followed them, remaining there about one year. He then returned to San 
Francisco and was engaged in business for another year. In 1851 he went to 
San Jose, Cal., where he was engaged in farming and horticulture, and, with 
his brother, in real estate. In 1880 he came East to conduct a litigation in con- 
nection with an estate in New Jersey of which he had charge as residuary ex- 
ecutor, and never returned to California. He resided with a niece in New 
London from 1892. 

Although never ordained, Mr. Douglas was always a useful Christian man 
as a teacher and a citizen, and an active promoter of religious enterprises dur- 
ing the years of his pioneer experience on the Pacific Coast. He was an early 
member and deacon of the First Congregational Church in San Francisco, and 



194 

also of the First Presbyterian Church in San Jose. A memorial service in his 
honor was held in the latter church after the news of his death was received. 

Mr. Douglas died, unmarried, of valvular disease of the heart, in New 
London, Ct, January 27, 1895, a S ed eighty-seven years, nine months, and 
twenty- eight days. 

CLASS OF 1838. 

Alfred Emerson. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Joseph Emerson and Rebecca Hasseltine ; born in Beverly, 
Mass., April 5, 181 2; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; 
graduated at Yale College, 1834 ; studied in this Seminary, 1835-37 ; tutor, 
Yale College, 1837-40; in ill health at his mother's home in Bradford, Mass., 
1S40-45; licensed by the Hampshire Association, meeting at Northampton, 
Mass., May 1, 1844. He was ordained, October 15, 1845, as pastor of the church 
in South Reading, now Wakefield, Mass., where he remained until 1853; pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy in Western Reserve 
College, 1853-56; pastor in South Berwick, Me., 1857-58; of the Calvinist 
Church, Fitchburg, Mass., 1858-70; resided, without charge, at Lancaster, 
Mass., 1870-77, and at Dorchester, Mass., afterwards until his death. 

Mr. Emerson's ancestry was one of marked piety, culture, and usefulness. 
His father was eminent as the early promoter and founder of seminaries for 
young ladies at Byfield and Saugus, Mass., and Wethersfield, Ct., and author 
of Emerson's Watts on the Mind, and his mother was of the family that gave 
Ann Hasseltine to the early history of foreign missions and Abigail Hasseltine 
to Bradford Academy. He was a trustee of Wheaton Seminar}', Norton, Mass., 
1872-92, and treasurer of that institution, 1881-91. His only publications were 
two sermons. 

Rev. Albert H. Plumb, D.D., of Roxbury, Mass. (Class of 1858), sends the 
following tribute : " The ministry of Mr. Emerson was an eminently judicious 
one; good judgment, a wise regard for the great aims of the ministerial office, 
subordination of minor questions whose undue prominence might interfere with 
success, a steady persistence in the performance of regular duties, and a calm 
reliance on the reasonableness of the Christian claims were among his ruling 
traits. Hence he had special influence over mature minds. While his affec- 
tionate nature and genial manner and his familiarity with the best educational 
methods of his time naturally attached to him the youth of his congregations, 
his powers of reasoning, his good sense in pressing continually and strongly for 
the main issues, doubtless constituted one reason why many of the strong men 
of the places where he preached were brought into the church under his minis- 
try. It has been thought that here was seen one natural result of the strongly 
mathematical turn of his mind. Demonstration rather than imagination seemed 
to give him content. In mathematics he always took delight, even turning for 
rest in his weariness from other studies to the solution of some difficult alge- 
braic problem. In the cares of rebuilding Wheaton Seminary, and in his serv- 
ice as treasurer, his accounts showed his passion for accuracy in details and his 
zeal in the minute performance of every duty involved in a scrupulous fidelity 
to his trust. The serenity of his years of retirement and decline conspicuously 
exhibited the ripe fruits of the gospel he had preached. His kind estimate of 



195 

other ministers, his tender and prayerful interest in the progress of God's king- 
dom in all lands, his grateful appreciation of the presence and ministrations of 
his family, and his satisfaction in the quiet communion of his Christian home 
furnished abundant evidence that he was peculiarly refined in spirit and made 
• meet to be a partaker of the inheritance of the saints in light.' " 

Mr. Emerson was married, October 18, 1847, to Martha Eliza Waldo Vose, 
of Lancaster, Mass., daughter of Peter Thacher Vose and Ann Austin Spraguei 
who survives him, with their two daughters. 

He died of apoplexy, at Dorchester, Mass., February 7, 1896, aged eighty- 
three years, ten months, and two days. 

Harvey Denison Kitchel, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Jonathan Kitchel and Caroline Holley ; born in Whitehall, 
X. Y., February 3, 1812; prepared for college at Middlebury (Vt.) Academy 
graduated at Middlebury College, 1835; studied in this Seminary, 1835-36 
tutor, Middlebury College, 1836-37 ; graduated at Yale Divinty School, 1838 
He was ordained, February 20, 1839, as pastor of the church in Plymouth Hoi 
low, now Thomaston, Ct., and remained there until 1848; pastor of the Firs 
Congregational Church, Detroit, Mich., 1848-64; acting pastor, Plymouth 
Church, Chicago, 1864-66; president of Middlebury College, 1866-73, acting, 
also, as pastor of church in Weybridge, Vt., 1867-74; without charge, after 
1874, residing chiefly in East Liverpool, Ohio, and in the Jackson Sanatorium, 
Dansville, N. Y. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Middle- 
bury College in 1858. He published several ordination and dedication sermons 
besides his inaugural discourse at Middlebury College, a prize essay on the 
suppression of the liquor traffic, and a genealogical account of Robert Kitchel 
and His Descendants. He was an early and zealous advocate of the anti-slavery 
movement, and for many years a corporate member of the American Board. 
His influence in the West was largely felt in the upbuilding of Congregation- 
alism and in the founding of Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Rufus C. Flagg, D.D., president of Ripon College (Class of 1872), 
who was one of his pupils at Middlebury, writes of him: "Dr. Kitchel came 
into the presidency of Middlebury College immediately from the pastorate, and 
he therefore naturally brought with him the pastorly spirit. It was this chiefly, 
I think, which at first impressed the minds of his pupils. Here was a man who 
was not greatly concerned to sustain the dignity of his position, who preferred 
not to use the authority vested in him as president, but who would, if possible, 
guide and mold the young men over whom he was placed by becoming their 
friend and counselor. None of us who came under the instruction of President 
Kitchel can doubt the sincerity and depth of his affection for us all. After the 
discipline of years, with the readjustments which time brings, we look back with 
brimming hearts to that noble instructor whose most noticeable characteristic 
was that he loved his pupils. 

" Dr. Kitchel commanded attention also as a master of thought and ex- 
pression. He grasped his themes clearly, thoroughly searched out their vari- 
ous aspects and relations, and then set them forth in a diction which for rich- 
ness, stateliness, and magnificence could hardly be matched by any of his 
contemporaries. No one who heard his inaugural address can ever forget the 



196 

impression of grandeur which it made. Dr. Kitchel was doubtless more at 
home in the pulpit and on the platform than in the recitation room, but even 
in the recitation room his genius of clear thought and illuminating expression 
did not forsake him. The pupils remember him as a good instructor and a 
faithful administrator, but among preachers a prince. The essential goodness 
of his heart found fullest expression in his home. It was there that we saw 
the man in his strength and simplicity of character. His long and useful life, 
ended so peacefully and beautifully, is an object of contemplation which one 
loves to retain long in his thoughts. Certainly he commands the gratitude of 
his old pupils." 

Dr. Kitchel was married, August 20, 1838, to Ann Smith Sheldon, of Ru- 
pert, Vt., daughter of David Sheldon and Jerusha Smith. She died June I, 
1858. He married, second, June 25, 1863, Mrs. Ophelia Geer Sayre, of Am- 
herst, Mass., daughter of Thompson Kimberly and Deborah Griffin, and widow 
of Ezekiel Sanford Sayre. She died June 21, 1864. He married, third, June 20, 
1866, Mrs. Harriet Smith, of Milwaukee, Wis., daughter of Truman Tyrrell and 
Aurelia Morse, of Lanesboro, Mass., and widow of William Riley Smith. She 
survives him. Two daughters died in infancy. Of his six sons, two are law- 
yers, one is a physician, and one, Rev. Cornelius L. Kitchel, a Connecticut 
minister, now instructor in Yale College. 

Dr. Kitchel died of heart failure, while speaking in a prayer meeting in the 
chapel of the Sanatorium at Dansville, N. Y., September 11, 1895, a g e d eighty- 
three years, seven months, and eight days. 



CLASS OF 1840. 

Daniel Wight. 

Son of Daniel Wight and Zillah Goulding ; born in Natick, Mass., Septem- 
ber 18, 1808 ; before beginning his preparation for college taught school sev- 
eral seasons in Sherborn, Millbury, and Natick; fitted for college at Phillips 
Academy, Andover ; graduated at Harvard College, 1837 ; took the full course 
in this Seminary, 1837-40 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, 
meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, at Andover, April 7, 1840; continued 
study here, as Abbot Resident, 1840-41. He was ordained over the church in 
Scituate, Mass., September 28, 1842, and remained there until 1858; supplied 
the churches in East Randolph, Dover, and South Natick, Mass., several months 
each in 1858 and 1859; acting pastor, Boylston, Mass., 1860-61 ; missionary of 
the American Board among the Seneca Indians on the Cattaraugus Reserva- 
tion, N.Y., 1862-63; pastor, Second Church, Ashburnham, Mass., 1863-71; 
without charge afterwards at Natick, Mass. 

Mr. Wight received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Williams 
College in 1850. He was the librarian of Morse Institute Library in Natick, 
l8 75~ 8 3- H e published three ecclesiastical pamphlets while at Scituate and a 
steel engraving of Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, with a Key. He taught for 
many years at Natick a Bible class, the numbers of which reached nearly a 
hundred. 

Rev. James D. Butler, LL.D., of Madison, Wis. (Class of 1840), sends the 
following tribute : " Daniel Wight, the last survivor but one of my classmates, 
was one of the three oldest members of the class and the only graduate of Har- 



i 9 7 

vard. His forte in college was said to be mathematics. In the Seminary he 
seemed somewhat slow to learn, but was steadily studious; rather reserved, and 
a man of few words. His sixteen years in Scituate enlarged a crippled church 
and left it independent. His subsequent labors among New York Indians were 
suited to his desires and aptitudes. They would have lasted longer but for the 
failing health of his wife. 

" Some years ago, seeing how thin our ranks had become, I endeavored to 
draw them closer by linking all survivors in an epistolary chain. My proposal 
was welcomed by Daniel Wight, who persevered in writing me with his own 
hand, even after his partial paralysis. Though my home is distant, I was able 
to see him in his own on May Day, 1894. Thus I learned how he still brought 
forth fruit in old age. His mural map, illustrating Pilgrim's Progress, his 
monthly articles for a score of years in Popular Science News, his bibliothecal 
services, his magnificent Bible class, and his elaborate manuscript on the Psy- 
chology of the Bible came to my knowledge. 

" The Sabbath of his years abounded in the peace of God. His garden 
made him self-supporting to the last, while affording him even more pleasure 
than profit. He loved a maple he had planted before his door and other old 
contemporary trees. His vines yearly yielded four hundred bottles of tirosh, 
each with its Hebrew label, to the Congregational House. At the evening time 
there was light, for he, an Israelite in whom there was no guile, walked with 
God in an earthly paradise that had not lost all its original brightness." 

Mr. Wight was married four times — first, September 26, 1842, to Lucy 
Flint, of North Reading, Mass., daughter of Dea. Addison Flint and Sarah 
Upton, who died August 5, 1846; second, September 7, 1847, to Julia Russell, 
of Kingston, Mass., daughter of Dea. George Russell and Amelia Drew, who 
died August 8, 1849; third, April 28, 1851, to Mary Ann Perkins, of Braintree, 
Mass., daughter of Rev. Jonas Perkins and Rhoda Keith, who died October 26, 
1853; fourth, October 4, 1855, to Mary Sewall Briggs, of Marblehead, Mass., 
daughter of Dr. Calvin Briggs and Rebecca Monroe, who survives him, with 
one daughter by the first marriage. 

Mr. Wight died of heart failure, following angina pectoris, in Natick, Mass., 
December 21, 1895, a g ec * eighty-seven years, three months, and three days. 



CLASS OF 1841. 
Charles Peabody. 

Son of John Peabody and Lucy Goodrich ; born in Peterboro, N. H., July 
1, 1810; prepared for college at the Strong School, South Hadley, Mass., and 
Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass.; graduated at Williams College, 1838; took 
the full course in this Seminary, 1838-41 ; licensed by the Andover Association, 
meeting with the Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 1841. He was 
ordained, December 8, 1841, as pastor of the First Church, Biddeford, Me., and 
remained there until 1843; acting pastor, Barrington, R. I., 1843-46; pastor, 
Ashford, Ct., 1846-50; acting pastor, Windham, Mass., 1850-54, and in North 
Pownal, Vt., 1854-57; First Church, Biddeford, Me., 1857-66; Eliot, Me., 
1866-69; Epsom, N. H., 1869-72; Ashburnham, Mass., 1872-75; resided after- 
wards in Longmeadow, Mass. 

His Seminary classmate, Rev. Theodore J. Clark, of Springfield, Mass., 



198 

writes thus : " Rev. Charles Peabody was among the oldest men of his classes 
both in college and in Seminary. He always felt and sometimes spoke of the 
limitations under which he labored from the lack of early educational oppor- 
tunities and from beginning his preparation for the ministry so late in life. But 
by conscientious and diligent study he became a very useful and diligent worker 
in the kingdom of Christ, 'a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly 
dividing the word of truth.' In his views of religious truth he was very con- 
servative, a minister of the old school, holding fast the form of sound words 
and keeping the faith once delivered to the saints. He was a man of kind and 
genial disposition, of sound judgment, and of sincere and earnest piety. He 
held pastorates of different length in each of the New England States, but it is 
worthy of note as indicating the hold which he gained upon the affections of his 
people that after an absence of twenty years from the place of his first pastorate 
he was invited back and remained there nine years. He manifested a deep and 
practical interest in the cause of missions. Inheriting some property by the 
death of a brother, he was able to give generous support to that cause while he 
lived and by his will to leave it substantial legacies. Retiring from active serv- 
ice in 1875 to Longmeadow, he carried thither and manifested to the last the 
same love and zeal for good things which had animated him through his long 
ministry. He was held in high esteem in that community, and, like the father 
of the faithful, ' died in a good old age, an old man and full of years, and was 
gathered to his fathers.' " 

Mr. Peabody was married, November 13, 1841, to Almena Porter, of Wil- 
liamstown, Mass., daughter of Daniel Porter and Mary Badger. She died in 
September, 1856. He married, second, December 10, 1857, Emily Sophia Ball, 
of Lee, Mass., daughter of Nathan Ball and Fear Chadwick, who survives him. 

Mr. Peabody died of dropsy of the heart, at Longmeadow, Mass., February 
9, 1896, aged eighty-five years, seven months, and eight days. 

Ephraim Williams Allen. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Ephraim Williams Allen (editor of the Newburyport Herald) and 
Dorothy Stickney; born in Newburyport, Mass., October 9, 18 13; fitted for 
college at Hampton (N. H.) Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1838; 
studied in this Seminary, 1838-39, and graduated at Yale Divinity School, 1841 ; 
licensed to preach by the Litchfield South Association in 1842. He was ordained, 
May 17, 1843, a s pastor of the church in North Reading, Mass., and remained 
there until 1852; pastor of Howard Street Church, Salem, Mass., 1852-57; of 
church in South Berwick, Me., 1858-66; of West Church, Haverhill, Mass., 
1866-76; acting pastor, North Middleboro, Mass., 1877-83; North Falmouth, 
Mass., 1883-85; East Taunton, Mass., 1885-90; without charge afterwards, 
residing with his daughter in Brooklyn, N. Y., and from May 1, 1896, in 
Newark, N. J. 

Mr. Allen was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. His long life was a useful and fruitful one, his pastoral service con- 
tinuing until he was seventy-seven years old. Rev. Moses K. Cross (Class of 
1841) writes from Waterloo, lo., just as this sketch goes to press, to speak of his 
college classmate, whom he had known little of "since our college days till 
within the past few years, when we were both approaching fourscore. Since 



i 9 9 

then I have had a most charming correspondence with him, a specimen of which 
I inclose to show his marvelous penmanship and his bright and genial nature 
especially when you remember that his writing was done by steadying his right 
hand with his left, very slowly and with pain, in consequence of paralysis. It is 
plain that the disease did not reach his mind nor his heart." One extract is 
made from Mr. Allen's letter : " Well, I may live a little longer. I am not 
anxious to live or die. The idea of immortality has for me what I may truly 
style an awful fascination, and I am not seldom moved to cry out with a pas- 
sionate longing : 

Fly swifter round, ye wheels of time, 

And bring the welcome day." 

Mr. Allen was married, October 9, 1844, to Anne Emily Ham, of Ports- 
mouth, N. H., daughter of Timothy Ham and Zoah Hilliard. She survives 
him, with two sons, who are business men in the West, and two daughters. One 
son and one daughter died in early childhood. 

Mr. Allen died of cerebral apoplexy, in Newark, N. J., May 17, 1896, aged 
eighty- two years, seven months, and eight days. 

David Greene Haskins, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Ralph Haskins and Rebecca Greene; born in Boston, May 1, 1818; 
prepared for college at Charles W. Greene's school for boys, Jamaica Plain, 
Mass.; graduated at Harvard College, 1837; taught in Mr. Greene's school, 
1838-39; studied in this Seminary, 1838-39; preceptor of Portland (Me.) Acad- 
emy, 1841-44; continued theological study under Rev. Mark Anthony De Wolfe 
Howe (afterwards Bishop of Central Pennsylvania) at Roxbury, teaching at the 
same time a school for girls, 1844-46; ordained deacon in the Episcopal Church 
by Bishop Henshaw, in Providence, R. I., April 29, 1847 '■> preached as supply 
in Christ Church, Gardiner, Me., 1847 ; ordained priest by Bishop Eastburn, in 
Roxbury, Mass., June 26, 1848; first rector of Grace Church, Medford, Mass., 
1847-52; principal of school for girls in Lowell, 1852-53; established and con- 
ducted the Concord Hall School for young ladies in Boston (often preaching, 
and supplying one year in Hyde Park), 1852-62; first rector of Church of the 
Epiphany, Brighton, Mass., 1862-66; agent of the Executive Committee of 
Missions, 1867 5 chaplain of McLean Asylum for the Insane, Somerville, 1868- 
1869; traveled in Europe, 1873-74; first rector of St. John's Church, Arlington, 
1875-80; minister of St. Bartholomew's Mission, Cambridgeport, 1889-96; re- 
sided in Cambridge from 1862. 

Mr. Haskins received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Columbia 
College, 1877. He was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. He served as treasurer of the Diocese of Massachusetts, 1850-51, and 
was chosen General Commissioner of Education of the University of the South, 
1877. In addition to the churches organized by Dr. Haskins as indicated above, 
he was largely instrumental in establishing others at North Conway, N. H., Bar 
Harbor and Prout's Neck, Me. In later years he had devoted special attention 
to the application of the force of air waves, had written extensively on the sub- 
ject, and had secured several patents for inventions. He published Selections 
from the Old and New Testaments ; French and English First Book ; Study of 
the Larger Dictionaries ; What Is Confirmation ? Religious Education of Chil- 



200 

dren in New England; Requisites for a Church School; Brief Account of the 
University of the South ; Maternal Ancestors of Ralph Waldo Emerson (his 
cousin) ; Story of St. Bartholomew's Church. 

Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, D.D., of Boston, registrar of the Diocese of 
Massachusetts (Class of 1844), writes of Dr. Haskins : " He was a man of 
scholarly habits, of great industry, perseverance, and modesty. He discharged 
his duties with fidelity and thoroughness, and was self-consecrated in the service 
of Christ and his Church. He was abundant in good works, and in social life 
was always a true, sincere, and sympathizing friend." 

He was married, December 20, 1842, to Mary Cogswell Daveis, of Portland, 
Me., daughter of Hon. Charles Stewart Daveis, LL.D., and Elizabeth Taylor 
Gilman. She survives him, with one son, David Greene Haskins, Jr., Harvard 
College, 1866, and two daughters. A son and a daughter died in childhood. 

Dr. Haskins died of old age and general debility, at Cambridge, Mass., 
May 11, 1896, aged seventy-eight years and ten days. 



CLASS OF 1842. 

Edward Phelps Blodgett. 

Son of Cephas Blodgett and Huldah Gaylord ; born in East Windsor, Ct., 
August 23, 181 5; the family removing in his infancy to Amherst, Mass., he was 
prepared for college at Amherst Academy ; graduated at Amherst College, 
1838; taught one year in Hatfield Academy; took the full course in this Semi- 
nary, 1839-42 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Rev. Justin Edwards, D.D., at Andover, April 12, 1842; ordained over the 
church in Greenwich, Mass., July 5, 1843, an0 ^ remained there until 1894, re- 
siding afterwards in Roslindale, Mass. 

Mr. Blodgett's half century of service in the quiet parish of Greenwich was 
one of faithful, devoted usefulness, not only as a pastor, but in connection with 
the schools of the town, of which he was superintendent for thirty years. The 
fiftieth anniversary of this pastorate in 1893 was appropriately observed, one of 
the participants being Rev. Edmund Dowse, D.D., of Sherborn, Mass., the only 
minister of the denomination in the United States who had been settled in the 
same place for a longer period. His only publications were a memorial sermon 
on Rev. Henry Martyn Tupper and discourses at the fortieth and fiftieth anni- 
versaries of his settlement in Greenwich. 

Rev. Lyman Whiting, D.D., of East Charlemont, Mass., a seminary class- 
mate and a lifelong friend, before and after, writes of Mr. Blodgett: "When 
five years old he went with his father to see laid the corner stone of South Col- 
lege, the first building of the Amherst College group. For seventy-five years 
he has looked each year upon the building of whose beginning he was no doubt 
the last surviving witness. In the old Amherst Academy we first met and 
tugged together over the antique Latin Reader. Threescore years in compan- 
ionship in study and blessed ministry had been ours. Steadfast industry had 
given him a fair rank as a scholar. A faithful, devout spirit had kept him from 
the distortions of theological empiricisms, and a gospel vitality, winning lucid- 
ity and fervor of manner kept his messages in a feeling contact with his hear- 
ers. A strenuous moderation — so to call it — made him a daily reader of the 



201 



Greek Testament for years, and a visitor to his college for forty-eight out of 
fifty commencements, and kept him in his pulpit on every Sabbath but one in 
forty-three years. He knew about every one of his nearly four thousand ser- 
mons and of every communion season, marriage, and burial in his parish. 
Scarce a leakage could be found in the ' golden censer ' holding the offerings 
of his life. A wholeness and entirety enrich his record seldom seen in poor 
mortal life." 

Mr. Blodgett was married, at Andover, July 12, 1843, to Mary Sutton Webb, 
daughter of Thomas Webb and Susan Grimsby, of Stowmarket, Suffolk, Eng- 
land, and sister of Rev. Edward Webb, of the Class of 1845. She diedOcto- 
ber 29, 1874. They had two sons and three daughters; the sons died in child- 
hood; two of the daughters are connected with the Young Women's Christian 



Association in Boston. 



Mr. Blodgett died of pneumonia, after an illness of but one day, at Roslin- 
dale, Mass., December 28, 1895, a ged eighty years, four months, and five days. 



CLASS OF 1843. 

Edwin Bela Turner. 

Son of Timothy Turner and Abigail Grant; born in Great Barrington, 
Mass., October 2, 18 12. His grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier, fighting 
at Ticonderoga and Bennington, and his father a famous temperance lecturer in 
the early days of that reform. He worked on his father's farm until he was 
sixteen years old, and then as an apprentice at the trade of machine manufac- 
turing. While thus engaged, he attended religious meetings held in a woolen 
mill by Rev. Horatio Foote, and decided to change his plan of life and fit for 
the ministry. He fitted for college at Kinderhook (N. Y.) Academy, and, re- 
moving to Illinois with his father's family, entered the sophomore class of Illi- 
nois College, graduating in 1840 at the age of twenty-eight. He took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1840-43, and was licensed to preach by the Andover 
Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, April 11, 1843. He was 
ordained at Denmark, Io., November 5, 1843, anc * was home missionary pastor 
at Cascade, Io., until 1847, and at Colesburg, Io., until 1854. He was then 
pastor at Morris, 111., for ten years and superintendent of the American Home 
Missionary Society for Missouri, residing at Hannibal, from 1864 to J 876. Re- 
moving to New York, he was acting pastor at Owego, 1876-77, at Columbus, 
1878-80, and at Chenango Forks, 1880-83, residing afterwards, without charge, 
at Owego. 

Mr. Turner was one of the famous " Iowa Band " of eleven men, of the 
Class of 1843, having had as a Western man an early part in the movement by 
writing (while a junior in 1841) a letter of inquiry to " Father Turner," of Iowa, 
whom he had known at Illinois College. Great interest was taken in the going 
of so large a number to that distant territory, and a special service was held at 
the South Church, Andover, on the Sunday before the anniversary, in Septem- 
ber, 1843, Dr. Leonard Bacon (Class of 1823) preaching the sermon, Dr. Milton 
Badger (Class of 1827) giving them the charge, and President George E. Pierce, 
of Western Reserve College (Class of 1821), offering prayer. Their long jour- 
ney was made by way of the Lakes and the Mississippi to Burlington, thence 



202 

by wagons to Denmark, whence, after prayer and consultation by the few breth- 
ren already in the field, they separated, going to different parts of the territory. 

Of Mr. Turner's part in the great work accomplished in the then new West, 
Rev. William Salter, D.D., of Burlington, Io., a classmate and one of the 
" Band," writes : " As his nearest neighbor in the first field that he occupied 
in the territory, which was then in the farthest settlements to the northwest in 
the United States, I recall the hardships and privations of his situation, the 
howling winds of the long and desolate prairies that he traversed in meeting 
his appointments from settlement to settlement, and the howling wolves which 
frequently broke the slumbers of the night. Gradually the wild prairie was 
subdued and brought under the plow, and the log cabin gave way to a more 
comfortable home, but for several years he shared an extreme measure of ex- 
posure and hardness. Through such services the Iowa wilderness was made 
to blossom with schools and churches and Christian homes. . . . His labors 
in Missouri involved much long and dangerous travel, and were attended with 
many embarrassments from the social repellences and distractions of the Civil 
War and the antagonisms of an old and a new civilization. Bravely and per- 
sistently he stood to his work, evolving order out of chaos, preparing the way 
for the better times that have since dawned. He found in that State only four 
Congregational churches, and when he resigned the superintendency left a roll 
of seventy-one churches." 

Mr. Turner married, July 17, 1845, J ane Brush, of Buffalo, N. Y., daughter 
of Edmund H. Brush and Hannah Stone, and she survives him, with three 
adopted daughters, their two children having died in infancy. 

He died of old age, at Owego, N. Y., July 6, 1895, a S e d eighty-two years, 
nine months, and four days. 



CLASS OP 1844. 

William Stinson Blanchard. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Timothy Blanchard and Margaret Stone ; born in Wilton, Me., Feb- 
ruary 10, 1813; studied three years in Waterville College (now Colby Univer- 
sity), and graduated at Bowdoin College, 1840; studied in this Seminary, 1841- 
1843; graduated at Lane Theological Seminary, 1845. He was ordained by the 
Central Association of Illinois, at Knoxville, 111., October 12, 1846, and was set- 
tled for three years at Sheboygan, Wis. He was instructor in Ancient Lan- 
guages and History in Cleveland University, Cleveland, O. (the institution 
started by Dr. Asa Mahan after leaving Oberlin), 1852-60. He afterwards re- 
sided for several years in Mendota and Chicago, 111., traveled abroad, and about 
1889 removed to Winthrop, Me. 

Mr. Blanchard practically abandoned the ministerial profession many years 
ago, although occasionally preaching when itinerating through the country. He 
was much engaged in certain kinds of literary work, and in 1872 published a 
poem of seven thousand lines, entitled The Pilgrims. 

He was married, March 3, 1875, to Sarah Philena Gardner, daughter of 
Richard and Mary Gardner. 

He died of old age, at Winthrop, Me., May 10, 1896, aged eighty-three 
years and three months. 



203 

George Frederick Magoun, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Hon. David Crooktr Magoun and Hannah Crooker Webb; born 
in Bath, Me., March 29, 1821 ; prepared for college at Bath Academy; gradu- 
ated at Bowdoin College, 1841 ; studied in this Seminary, 1841-42, with Rev. 
Ray Palmer at Bath, 1842-43, and at Yale Divinity School, 1843-44; principal 
of high school, Galena, 111., 1844-45, and of academy at Plattesville, Wis., 
1845-46 ; licensed to preach by the Mineral Point Convention, at New Diggings! 
Wis., May 18, 1846; returned to Andover as resident licentiate, 1846-47. De- 
termining to make the West his field, he went to Wisconsin in 1847, and gath- 
ered a home missionary church at Shullsburg, to which he ministered for seven 
months, in the mean time being ordained there by the Mineral Point Conven- 
tion, January 25, 1848. He was pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, 
Galena, 111., 1848-51 ; then studied law with United States Senator James W. 
Grimes, of Burlington, Io. ; was admitted to the bar in 1853, entering into part- 
nership with William H. Starr, one of the original trustees of Iowa College ; 
returning to the ministry, was pastor of the Congregational Church, Daven- 
port, Io., 1855-60, and at Lyons, Io., 1860-64. I" 1862 he was elected presi- 
dent of Iowa College, which, in 1858, had been removed from Davenport, the 
place of his former pastorate, to Grinnell, and of which he had been trustee 
since 1856. He accepted the appointment in 1864, and began his duties, after 
a few months' sojourn in Europe, in 1865, being inaugurated in July of that 
year. He resigned the presidency in 1884, but continued to instruct in Mental 
and Moral Philosophy until 1890, and to reside at Grinnell until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst College in 
1867. He was for many years a corporate member of the American Board and 
a frequent speaker or preacher at the meetings of that and other national soci- 
eties. He was editor of the Iowa News Letter, and for several years one of the 
editors of the Con* relational Review. His elaborate articles published in the 
Bibliotheca, New Englander, and other magazines numbered about one hundred, 
while his contributions to newspapers of various kinds, East and West, were 
almost numberless. He published about fifty sermons and addresses besides 
the volume upon Asa Turner and His Times. He was Lecturer on Home 
Missions at this Seminary, 1878-80. He was four times elected a delegate to 
prominent conventions in Europe. 

Rev. Alden B. Robbins, D.D., of Muscatine, Io. (Class of 1843), one °f tne 
original "Iowa Band "and a lifelong friend, writes: "His intellectual action 
was marvelous, demanding in his preaching, for example, more attention and 
response than many could endure, his most admiring hearers unwilling to hear 
and digest more than one discourse of his on the Lord's Day. His sermons 
were ordinarily written in full, yet he had the power of eloquently and logically 
speaking on almost any subject without a note, and for this he would make use 
at will of anybody or anything. He was impatient of all false reasoning, and 
somewhat imperious in his treatment of any such argument and its author. He 
was ever ready, however, to atone for any seeming severity. Dr. Magoun must 
in many respects be regarded as at least the peer of, if not superior to, any man 
in the forensic, educational, and sermonic line honoring the State of Iowa dur- 
ing the years from 1844 to 1896. The writer of this notice, observing the work 
and standing of Dr. Magoun for twenty years on the Board of Trustees of 
Iowa College, for twenty-seven years on the Board of Directors of the Chicago 



204 

Theological Seminary, and for twenty-one years as a corporate member of the 
American Board, and more or less familiar with the frequent use he has made 
for many years of the standard periodicals of this country and in Europe, and 
of many less prominent but perhaps equally useful publications, rejoices in the 
recollection of an unbroken friendship for over fifty years with so noble a work- 
man in the kingdom of Christ on earth." 

Dr. Magoun was married, September 8, 1847, to Abby Anna Hyde, of Bath, 
Me., daughter of Gershom Hyde and Sarah Hyde. She died February 10, 1864; 
he married, second, July 5, 1870, Elizabeth Earle, of Brunswick, Me., daughter 
of George Earle and Angeline Merrill, who survives hum. Of their twelve chil- 
dren, seven died in infancy; Frederic H. was a pastor in Iowa and died in 1885. 
One son and two daughters survive, one of the latter being the wife of Rev. S. 
G. Barnes, of Longmeadow, Mass. 

Dr. Magoun died of heart failure, at Grinnell, Io., January 30, 1896, aged 
seventy- four years, ten months, and one day. 



GLASS OF 1845. 

Joshua Sanders Gay. 

Son of Rev. Ebenezer Gay and Laura Sanders; born in Stoughton, Mass., 
February 7, 1819; prepared for college with his father and at Bridgewater 
(Mass.) Academy ; entered Amherst College as a sophomore, and graduated, 
1841 ; studied in this Seminary, 1841-42 and 1843-45; licensed to preach by 
the Norfolk Association, January 28, 1845, at North Abington, Mass. After 
preaching in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, 1845-46, and in Biddeford, Me., 
1846-47, he was ordained at Andover, Me., January 27, 1848, remaining there 
until 1851; pastor in Pittston, Me., 1852-54; acting pastor, Stoddard, N. H., 
1854-57 ; Chichester, N. H., 1857-63; without charge, 1863-66, residing at Chi- 
chester and East Concord, N. H. ; acting pastor, Byfield, Mass., 1866-69 ; with- 
out charge there, 1869-7°; acting pastor, Brookfield, Vt., 1870-71 ; Auburn, 
N. H., 1871-74; Centre Harbor, N. H., 1874-77; without charge, Meredith, N.H., 
1877-78; acting pastor, Hanson, Mass., 1878-82; Falmouth, Mass. (Wequoit 
Church), 1882-85; South Wellfleet, Mass, 1885-91; resided afterwards in 
Biddeford, Me. 

Rev. Thomas S. Robie, a neighbor of Mr. Gay in the Pilgrim Conference, 
writes of him: " Mr. Gay was an earnest preacher of the gospel, true to the old 
truths and paths of the Bible; faithful as a pastor and much esteemed by his 
brethren and the churches where he labored. He loved the work of the minis- 
try, and felt it a sacrifice to be suddenly summoned to lay down active service, 
but after five years of patient waiting he has been called by the Master he loved 
to that vineyard above where his servants shall serve him." 

Mr. Gay was married, May 15, 1848, to Sarah Elizabeth Jordan, of Bidde- 
ford, Me., daughter of Capt. Rishworth Jordan and Keziah Hill, who survives 
him, with three sons, two sons and a daughter having deceased. 

He died of paralysis, at Biddeford, Me., March 22, 1896, aged seventy- 
seven years, one month, and fifteen davs. 



205 



William Miller. 



Son of Comfort Miller and Polly Dane; born in New Braintree, Mass. 
August 8, 1817; prepared for college at Wilbraham Academy; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1842 ; studied in Hartford Seminary (then at East Windsor), 
1842-43, and in this Seminary, 1844-45; licensed to preach by the Andover As- 
sociation, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor, at Andover, April 8, 1845. He 
was ordained, October 1, 1845, as pastor of the church in Halifax, Vt., and re- 
mained there till 1847. He was pastor in Gill, Mass., 1847-50; teacher in 
Dennysville, Me., 1850-52, and in North Brookfield, Mass., 1852-54; pastor 
Sterling, Mass., 1855-58 ; resided there, without charge, 1858-60 ; acting pastor, 
Saundersville, 1860-63; acting pastor, Petersham, Mass., 1865-67; Mt. Carmel, 
Ct., 1867-69; Killingworth, Ct., 1869-79; Rocky Hill, Ct., 1879-82 ; Southbury, 
Ct., 1882-84; afterwards made his home in New Britain, Ct, although supply- 
ing the Nepaug Church in New Hartford, Ct., 1888-90, and the Buckingham 
Church in Glastonbury, Ct., 1892-94. 

Mr. Miller was chairman of the School Board while in Sterling and for four 
years while residing in Grafton. He published a historical account of the 
church and town of Killingworth, Ct. Rev. James W. Cooper, D.D., of New 
Britain, Ct. (Class of 1868), writes thus: "Brother Miller, as I knew him, was 
a good example of the type of Congregational ministers greatly to be honored 
for their works' sake in a generation now fast passing away. He was in man- 
ner and method a preacher of the old school — somewhat formal, but neither 
dull nor commonplace. He had a genius for illustration, and presented the 
truth in a vivid and practical way, so that the common people heard him gladly. 
He was genial, sympathetic, peace-loving, and his interest in young people 
seemed to increase with his years. At the age of threescore years and ten he 
undertook to retire from the active ministry, but his love for the work and the 
call of the churches could not be overcome, and in spite of impaired vision and 
hearing and of other infirmities he labored on successfully almost to the very 
end, and did some of the most useful work of his life during the last ten years. 
He was a good man and a faithful, devoted, and useful minister of Jesus Christ." 

A lady in Dr. Cooper's church writes the following : " Mr. Miller reached 
men, and really had the satisfaction of leading many men into the church and, 
better than that, to Christ. He often spoke at our midweek prayer service, 
and it so happened that last August during our pastor's absence he was asked 
to lead one of these meetings. He spent an evening in preparation for it, and 
was found dead in his study, with the papers about him relating to the subject 
announced for that service. This peaceful end was in keeping with the even 
tenor of his life." 

Mr. Miller was married, May 7, 1846, to Harriet Elizabeth Snow, of Shrews- 
bury, Mass., daughter of Hon. Henry Snow and Harriet Wheelock, who died 
December 27, 1867. He married, second, Mrs. Hannah Elizabeth Pardee, of 
New Canaan, Ct., daughter of Daniel Clark Button and Sarah Ayres, and widow 
of John Pardee, of Baltimore. She died January 26, 1890. One son and one 
daughter are deceased ; one son is professor of Anatomy in the University of 
Wisconsin, and two daughters are living. 

Mr. Miller died of heart failure, caused by fatty degeneration of the heart, 
at New Britain, Ct., August 14, 1895, a S ed seventy-eight years and six days. 



206 



Charles Henry Hall, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

Son of Charles Henry Hall (who removed from Boston to Georgia about 
1817) and Margaret Cecilia Reid ; born in Augusta, Ga., November 7, 1820; pre- 
pared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 1833-38; graduated at Yale Col- 
lege, 1842 ; studied in this Seminary, 1842-43; ordained deacon in the Episcopal 
Church by Bishop Onderkonk, at Tivoli, N. Y., August 25, 1844; and as priest 
by Bishop Brownell, at Fair Haven, Ct., November 12, 1845. He was rec " 
tor of St. John's Church, Huntington, L. I., 1845-47 ; of the Church of the 
Holy Innocents, at Buttermilk Falls, now Highland Falls, near West Point, 
\. V., 1847-48; of St. John's Church, St. John's Island, S. C, 1848-57 ; of the 
Church of the Epiphany, Washington, D. C, 1857-69; of the Church of the 
Holy Trinity, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1869-95. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hobart College in i860 
and from Columbia College in i86i,that of Doctor of Canon Law from Trinity 
College in 1891, and that of Doctor of Laws from Yale College in 1892. He 
was a prominent member and officer of the Long Island Historical Society 
and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. He was for many years 
the Chancellor of the Cathedral Church, Garden City, L. I., and held many 
positions of honor and trust in connection with his church and with the 
city of his residence. He was an intimate friend of Henry Ward Beecher, 
and preached his funeral sermon. Rev. Charles W. Homer, of Brooklyn 
(Class of 1851), sends as his tribute to Dr. Hall a copy of the Minute writ- 
ten by him in behalf of the Clerical League of the Diocese of Long Island and 
read at the Memorial Service in Holy Trinity Church, from which this quotation 
is made: "With a large tolerance and liberality toward those who differed 
from him, he was still decided and firm in his convictions and consistent in his 
practice. This signal liberality was by no means confined to those of his own 
'household of faith.' He longed, with all the intense longing that his great 
heart was capable of, for that absolute unity for which our Lord prayed. . . . 
On a memorable occasion he stood by the remains of a brother whom he loved 
and helped, although he was a minister of another communion, pointed out the 
excellencies of his life and character, his patriotic services, and his unstinted 
labors for the downtrodden and oppressed. His courage never failed him in 
doing what he regarded to be his duty. What might have been regarded as the 
dictates of prudence were sacrificed to the higher laws of brotherly kindness and 
charity, and by his action he won the hearts of thousands and did telling serv- 
ice for the cause of Christian unity. . . . This tribute would be incomplete 
did we not add a word to voice our pride and appreciation of Dr. Hall's influ- 
ence as a citizen. Strong in every department of ecclesiastical life, he was as 
signally prominent and influential in civic life. His wisdom, insight, and sturdy 
force of manhood made themselves felt in our municipal affairs. A zealous 
patron of liberal culture and a laborious and practical friend of Civil Service Re- 
form, from many provinces beyond the immediate domain of church matters 
his powerful hand will be greatly missed." 

Dr. Hall married, March 2, 1848, Annie Maria- Cumming, of Augusta, Ga., 
daughter of Judge Henry H. and Julia A. Cumming. She died November 2, 
1855. He married, second, Elizabeth Margaret Ames, of Washington, D. C, 
daughter of George Christian Ames and Hester Walter Milby. He had five 



207 

daughters and two sons, one of the daughters dying in 1882. The youngest 
son is a graduate of Yale College, 1894. 

Dr. Hall died of paralysis, at Brooklyn, N. Y., September 12, 1895, aged 
seventy-four years, ten months, and five days. 

CLASS OF 1846. 

Francis Brown Wheeler, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Hosea Wheeler and Sarah Wines; born in North Adams, 
Mass., September 9, 1818; prepared for college at Newton Academy, Shore- 
ham, Vt. ; graduated at the University of Vermont, 1842; studied in this Semi- 
nary, 1842-43; under Rev. James Wilson Ward (Class of 1830), at Abington, 
Mass., while engaged in teaching in that town, and returning to Andover for 
part of the year, 1843-44 ; licensed to preach by the Somerset (Me.) Associa- 
tion, May 1, 1844. He was ordained as pastor of the church at Jericho Centre, 
Yt., January 22, 1845, and remained there five years; was pastor in Brandon, 
Vt., 1850-54, in Saco, Me., 1854-59, and of the First Presbyterian Church, 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y., 1859-95. He had resigned his charge and been made 
pastor emeritus two months before his death, but his successor not having been 
chosen, he continued in active service to the last. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton College, 
1868. While a pastor in Vermont, he was for two years County Superintend- 
ent of Common Schools. He was a member of the Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution and of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of 
New York. In 1878 he was appointed by President Hayes one of the Board 
of Visitors at West Point Military Academy. He published in 1893 J oJin Flack 
IVinslow and the Monitor, and contributed much to the Evangelist, espe- 
cially in bits of choice poetry. His missionary hymn, " This World for Thee, 
O Christ," was translated into Marathi and had a wide circulation. 

Rev. Edward Webb, of Oxford, Pa., who was with him in the Seminary 
and has known him intimately since, writes of him : " Dr. Wheeler's fifty years' 
ministry in the church has left a record, distinct and pronounced, that ' he was 
a good man and full of the Holy Ghost.' In manners and bearing he was al- 
ways courteous and respectful ; he was so to all. Together with a self-respect 
that every one observed and admired, there was a slight self- depreciation and 
shrinking in deportment expressive of that beautiful humility of heart which 
won the reverence and confidence of all. His piety rested on deep convictions 
of truth. It had for its foundation a strong theological and doctrinal basis. It 
thrived and grew strong on the solid meat of revelation. I know, on the best 
authority, that, as he paced the street of Poughkeepsie and took walks in the 
vicinity of the city, he often recited to himself the entire Shorter Catechism. 
His sermons were all prepared carefully and prayerfully, and were always 
clothed in diction of faultless beauty. In style and rhetoric his culture was 
finished. The memory of my dear friend and beloved classmate is blessed." 

Dr. Wheeler was married, September 16, 1843, to Charlotte Amira Par- 
malee, of Williston, Vt., daughter of Rev. Simeon Parmalee, D.D., and Phebe 
Chapin. She died March 1, 1853. He married, second, October 26, 1854, 
Eliza Ann Dana, of Brandon, Vt., daughter of Hon. Anderson Green Dana, 
M.D., LL.D., and Eliza Ann Fuller. She died September 1, 1865, and he 



208 

married, third, October 25, 1876, Charlotte Penniman Wickes, of Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., daughter of Rev. Thomas Scudder Wickes and Julia Penniman, who 
survives him, with four daughters. 

Dr. Wheeler died of concussion of the brain, resulting from a fall, at 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., December 27, 1895, aged seventy-seven years, three 
months, and eighteen days. 

GLASS OP 1847. 

Martin Kellogg Whittlesey, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Hermon Whittlesey and Electa Kellogg; born in Stockbridge, 
Mass., September 14, 1821 ; removed with the family when five years old to 
Newington, Ct. ; fitted for college at Newington, in the family school of his 
pastor, Rev. Joab Brace, and at Monson (Mass.) Academy; graduated at Yale 
College, 1844; studied in this Seminary, 1844-45, and graduated at Yale Divin- 
ity School, 1847 ; licensed to preach by the New Haven West Association, Au- 
gust 10, 1847. After graduation he went West and supplied for a few months 
each the churches at Yellow Springs and Burlington, Io. ; began preaching at 
Ottawa, 111., June, 1848; was ordained pastor of the church there, January io, 
1849 ( at Lockport, 111.), and continued in that pastorate until 1870; pastor of 
church in Alton, 111., which he organized, 1870-72; superintendent of missions 
of the American Home Missionary Society in Central and Southern Illinois, re- 
siding at Jacksonville, 1872-78; without charge there until 1881, and afterwards 
at Ottawa, 111., until his death. 

He was chosen corresponding secretary of the Illinois State Association in 
1852, treasurer in 1857, and registrar in 1869, performing the duties of these 
offices with signal fidelity and accuracy until his death. He received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity from Illinois College in 1877, and was trustee of 
that institution for several years. Rev. George S. F. Savage, D.D., of Chicago, 
111., his theological classmate here and at New Haven, writes of him: "Dr. 
Whittlesey was scholarly, cultured, and studious in his habits. He loved his 
books. His Greek Testament was his familiar companion to the last. He 
was kind, sympathetic, genial, and friendly in his spirit; was prompt, faithful, 
and laborious in meeting his responsibilities as a pastor and missionary super- 
intendent. He was loyal to his own denomination, yet catholic in his feelings, 
gladly fellowshiping all who love our Lord Jesus Christ. He never lost his in- 
terest in or love for the work of the Christian ministry, and to the last delighted 
in proclaiming the great and blessed truths of Christ and His gospel, which he 
had found increasingly precious in his own personal experience. He prized the 
fellowship of his ministerial brethren, and delighted to honor the memory of 
those who had passed away by the tender, loving, and appreciative obituaries 
which for many years he penned and published in the annual reports of the 
State Association. As his redeemed spirit left its earthly tenement, he seemed 
to catch a glimpse of the heavenly host waiting to welcome him to the society 
of the blessed. His last words were, ' O, the angels, the angels ! ' " 

Dr. Whittlesey was married, June 5, 1849, m Burlington, Io., to Susan 
A. Camp, of Farmington, Ct, daughter of James Kellogg Camp and Caroline 
Deming. She survives him, with a son and a daughter. 

Dr. Whittlesey died of pneumonia, at Ottawa, 111., January 15, 1896, aged 
seventy- four years, four months, and one day. 



209 
GLASS OF 1848. 

Edmund Kimball Alden, D.D. 

Son of Ebenezer Alden, M.D. (forty-four years member of the Seminary 
Board of Trustees), and Anne Kimball ; born in Randolph, Mass., April n, 
1825; prepared for college at Randolph Academy; graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1844; taught in Williston Seminary, 1844-45; took th e full course in this 
Seminary, 1845-48; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting 
with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 11, 1848; continued study here 
as Abbot Resident, 1848-49; ordained as pastor of the First Church, Yarmouth, 
Me., January 2, 1850, and remained there four years; pastor in Lenox, Mass., 
I S54~59; pastor of Phillips Church, South Boston, Mass., 1859-76; succeeded 
Rev. Selah B. Treat, D.D. (Class of 1835), as Home Secretary of the American 
Board, filling that position until 1893; continued to reside afterwards in Boston 
until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst College in 
1866, was a trustee of that institution from 1873 to tne tmie °f his death, and of 
this Seminary from 1868 to 1882. He was elected a corporate member of 
the American Board, and was a member of the Prudential Committee from 
1869. until his election as one of the Corresponding Secretaries in 1876. He 
published while a pastor several discourses and a tract entitled The Risen Life 
in Christ. The reports, addresses, and other printed appeals prepared by him 
in connection with his secretaryship were many and had a large influence upon 
the constituency of the Board. Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, LL.D., of Phillips 
Academy (Class of 1867), co-trustee with Dr. Alden from 1873 to x 882, furnishes 
this tribute to him : " Dr. Alden's service to the churches from his ordination 
to his death divides itself into three parts — the pastorates, twenty-six years; 
the secretaryship, seventeen years ; the period of retirement, nearly three years. 
In them all he was the same prayerful and conscientious Christian, the same 
prudent and sagacious man of affairs, the same emotional but self- restrained 
personality. With his Pilgrim name he inherited Pilgrim virtues, convictions, 
sympathies, also strength and tenacity of physical and mental fiber and of moral 
purpose. The pastorates were filled with abundant labors for the flock, but he 
found room for generous efforts in many worthy causes outside the parish, but 
mostly within the denomination. He was genial, cordial, often mirthful, always 
serious, indefatigable, mindful of details, and he looked ahead. He preached 
with persuasiveness and power, and administered his parish with a bishop's 
careful oversight. When the Smith Professorship (Special Course) was founded 
in 1867 the trustees turned to him to organize the department as the first pro- 
fessor, but he was constrained to remain a pastor. Eight years later, however, 
he became Home Secretary, bringing to that office the confidence of all the 
churches, intimate acquaintance with the field at home and abroad, a consuming 
zeal for missions, a trained, vigilant, and enterprising mind. He threw himself 
into the work with his whole heart. The last years of his service were memora- 
ble in the history of the Board and the denomination. No man did more to 
make clear and definite the issues which were raised and to bring them to a 
conclusion. In the debated questions of policy and doctrine his own convic- 
tions were positive, and he maintained them with all the ardor of his sympathies 
and the strength of his faith. At the annual meeting in 1893 he chose rather to 



210 

lay down the leadership and serve in the ranks again than to seem to com- 
promise what he regarded as vital in the conduct of our missions. Relieved of 
the responsibilities of his great office, he gave himself, so far as his health per- 
mitted, to other forms of service for our churches and charities, our colleges 
and seminaries, our literature and missions, dispensing for himself and in sacred 
trust for others an unrecorded and generous beneficence. The catholic disposi- 
tion which he made by will of his own considerable estate attests his loyalty to 
his lifelong estimate of the doctrines, polity, traditions, and institutions of the 
Pilgrim faith. 

" Dr. Alden's interest in this Seminary goes back to his boyhood. The at- 
mosphere of his home was charged with Andover influences. His father was 
an active trustee and benefactor, and sometimes brought the son with him on 
his official visits. In due time the son was four years a student, a professor- 
elect, fourteen years a trustee, again and again a benefactor to Seminary and 
Academy, and the means of calling out gifts from others." 

Dr. Alden was married, April 25, 1850, to Maria Hyde, of Bath, Me., 
daughter of Dea. Gershom Hyde and Sarah Hyde. She survives him. 

Dr. Alden died of heart failure, at his home in Boston, April 30, 1896, aged 
seventy-one years and nineteen days. 



John Wheeler Harding. 

Son of Rev. Sewall Harding and Eliza Wheeler; born in Waltham, 
Mass., October 12, 1821 ; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; 
spent his freshman year at Amherst College, but graduated at Yale College, 
1845 > t0 °k tne f u ^ course in this Seminary, 1845-48 ; licensed by the Mendon 
Association, April 11, 1848; continued his study here as Abbot Resident, 
1848-49. He was ordained as pastor of the church in Longmeadow, Mass., 
January 1, 1850, and continued in its service forty-one years, retaining his sum- 
mer residence there, but acting during the remainder of the year as pastor of the 
little church in Ormond, Fla., from 1891 to the time of his death. 

Mr. Harding was a corporate member of the American Board, one of the 
executive committee of the Home Missionary Society, and an influential advo- 
cate of the work of the American Missionary Association. He was a prominent 
member from their formation of the Connecticut Valley Congregational Club and 
the Connecticut Valley Historical Society, and also of literary and library asso- 
ciations in the city of Springfield. He was for many years connected with the 
Springfield Republican as a contributor of book reviews and of valuable articles 
and letters of travel from Europe and the East. His historical address at the 
one hundredth anniversary of Longmeadow, in 1883, was published in the vol- 
ume of the Proceedings of the Centennial Celebration, of which he was one of 
the compilers. 

The value of Mr. Harding's pastorate in Longmeadow was grandly recog- 
nized at the celebration of its fortieth anniversary in 1890, in which, by person 
or by letter, many clergymen were participants, including his classmate, 
Dr. E. K. Alden, whose memorial precedes this. Perhaps the most fitting trib- 
ute to this long and faithful service in a single church and community is that 
prepared by the church itself and read at his funeral: "Resolved, that the 
sudden death of Rev. John W. Harding has come as a shock and a grief to our 



211 

whole community. His pastorate of forty-two years gave him a unique oppor- 
tunity to build himself broadly and deeply into the life of the town, and his serv- 
ices have been so various and so extensive that he will be greatly missed 
everywhere. He was ready as a citizen for every good work, as his labors in 
the interests of our schools and in the founding and maintenance of our street 
improvement association will testify. No son of the town, of the most ancient 
Longmeadow lineage, could have been more thoroughly at home in our history 
or more heartily in sympathy with our honorable traditions. His wide knowl- 
edge of men and his connection with various organizations outside of the town 
brought here as visitors and speakers many of the most notable men of our 
time. He had a genius for winning friends, and everywhere was quickly at 
home with the best people. He was a man of great prudence, of unfailing 
charity of judgment, a humble and devout Christian, a pastor beloved and hon- 
ored, under whose ministry nearly all of the present members of our church 
joined its numbers. It will be hard for us all to think of the town with him 
absent from it forever." 

Mr. Harding was married, December 29, 1852, to Mehitable Pratt Lane, of 
East Abington, Mass., daughter of Jenkins Lane and Mehitable Jenkins. She 
survives him, with two sons and two daughters. 

Mr. Harding died of heart failure, arising from fatty degeneration of the 
heart, at Ormond, Pla., April 14, 1896, aged seventy-four years, six months, 
and two days. 

CLASS OF 1849. 

Stephen Abbott Holt. 

Son of Uriah Holt (who went from Andover with his parents, Jacob Holt 
and Rhoda Abbot to the new township of Oxford, in the District of Maine, in 
1795, and became a famous surveyor in Maine, being for many years the agent 
of Judge Phillips and afterwards of " Squire Farrar " in surveying and selling 
Phillips Academy lands) and Hannah Farnum ; born in Norway, Me., Febru- 
ary 13, 1820; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated 
at Bowdoin College, 1846; took the full course of study in this Seminary, 1846- 
1849 5 wa s licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. 
John L. Taylor, Andover, April 17, 1849. He was ordained at Milton, Vl., 
January 1, 1850, but after a pastorate of one year there was obliged by the fail- 
ure of his health to abandon the ministry. He soon engaged in the lumber 
business in Boston in partnership with his father-in-law, Mr. Henry Cutter, 
upon whose death he became the head of the firm. He continued in business 
until about one year before his death, having his residence in Winchester. 

Mr. Holt was a prominent and active member of the church in Winchester, 
and his former pastor, Rev. Charles R. Seymour, of Bennington, Vt. (Class of 
1874), allows the use of his tribute published in the Congregationalist : "Busi- 
ness, however, although requiring close attention, did not deprive Mr. Holt of 
the enjoyments of an intellectual life. Chosen hours daily, or rather nightly, 
were devoted to books and to a correspondence in relation to themes philosoph- 
ical. His favorite subject was that of Biblical theology. For fifty years he was 
a Bible teacher, and his activity as a student enabled him to produce the ripe 
thought of past and present with that varied illustration which is the result of 
extended research. He was not afraid of advanced ideas or theories, and was 



212 

quite ready to adopt the newer view if it appealed to his unprejudiced judg- 
ment. The Congregational Church of Winchester has reason to be grateful 
for Mr. Holt's constant attention to every department of its life and work. 
The extensive repairs and ornamentation of ten years ago give token of his 
taste and sacrifice. But his labors and gifts were not confined to one field, ex- 
cept as we may say the field is the world. He had the spirit of the missionary 
and was a leader in that grand endeavor to bring into one comprehensive view 
the whole of humanity, by which Christians of the day are enabled to toil and 
pray for the world with the mind of the Master." 

Mr. Holt was married, May 28, 1850, to Nancy Wyman Cutter, of Boston, 
daughter of Henry Cutter and Nancy Wyman. She survives him, with four of 
their seven children, the youngest of whom is a graduate of Harvard College, 
1896. 

Mr. Holt died very suddenly of heart disease, in Boston, December 14, 
1895, a g ec * seventy-five years, ten months, and one day. 

GLASS OF 1852. 

Sylvanus Cobb Kendall. 

Son of Charleville Kendall and Jane S afford ; born in Searsmont, Me., 
November 23, 1824; fitted for college at China (Me.) Academy; studied in 
Waterville College (now Colby University) one year, and graduated at Am- 
herst College, 1849; to °k tne ^ u ^ course in this Seminary, 1849-52, and stud- 
ied here as resident licentiate, 1852-53, having been licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. W. T. Briggs, North Andover, April 13, 
1852. He was ordained as pastor over the church in Webster, Mass., March 29, 
1854, and remained there three years ; pastor, Milford, N. H., 1858-60 ; returned 
to Webster, for eight other years of service, 1860-68; pastor, Milford, Mass., 
1868-72; acting pastor, Winthrop Church, Holbrook, Mass., 1872-73; without 
charge, Lancaster, Mass., 1874-76; acting pastor, Williamsburg, Mass., 1876-78, 
and Leominster, Mass., 1878-79; without charge, Boston, Mass., 1880; pastor, 
Ellington, Ct., 1881-86; acting pastor, Dudley, Mass., 1887-89; resided after- 
wards in Bradford, Mass., and, from 1892, in Townsend, Mass. 

Mr. Kendall broke down from overwork in 1872 and was never afterwards 
strong, his exposure when shipwrecked on Long Island Sound in the autumn 
of that year having laid the foundation for subsequent years of feebleness, in 
which he was able to preach for short periods only. But from the different 
places of his ministry have come abundant testimonies to the ability and fidel- 
ity of his pastoral service similar to that written by Rev. Henry A. Blake (Class 
of 1876), of Webster, Mass. : "Those who remember Mr. Kendall here join in 
speaking of him as a strong preacher, who demanded and aroused thought in 
his hearers, and also often wrought by his preaching profound and lasting im- 
pressions. His sympathies when aroused were deep and led to very helpful 
ministries, while he was of a modest and very sensitive spirit." 

Mr. Kendall was married to Betsey Payson Greenleaf, of Bradford, Mass., 
daughter of Benjamin Greenleaf, the eminent mathematician, and Lucretia 
Kimball, who survives him. They had two sons and one daughter, but all are 
deceased. 

Mr. Kendall died of angina pectoris, at Townsend, Mass., October 12, 1895, 
aged seventy years, ten months, and nineteen days. 



213 

John Quincy Peabody. 

Son of Ezekiel Peabody and Polly Goodhue ; born in Ipswich, Mass., July 
28, 1825; fitted for college at the Ipswich Grammar School; graduated at Am- 
herst College, 1848; studied in this Seminary, 1848-49 and 1850-52; licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. W. T. Briggs, North 
Andover, April 13, 1852; resident licentiate here, 1852-53. He served as home 
missionary at Sedgwick, Me., 1853, as acting pastor at North Beverly, Mass., 
l8 53-55> and at Topsham, Me., 1855-56. He was ordained December 17, 1856, 
over the church at Fryeburg, Me., and remained there until 1859, when he was 
compelled by failing health to relinquish further service. He resided after- 
wards until his death in Ipswich, Mass. 

Although retired for nearly a half century from active ministerial labor, 
only occasionally preaching in the earlier years of this period, his life was one 
of quiet but earnest usefulness. For several years he served his town in the 
care of the schools, for which his thorough training and scholarly attainments 
specially fitted him. Though an invalid for nearly this whole period — for the 
last seven years never leaving the immediate vicinity of his residence — his life 
was a continual sermon and his example an abiding benediction. From early 
parishioners and from later friends have come many testimonies to the effective 
influence not only of his rich and scholarly sermons and of his pastoral service, 
but of his quiet, personal efforts for the blessing of others. One writes that he 
11 in his youth was with many others influenced by Mr. Peabody to take a stand 
for Christ." Another, a well-known educator, writes: "I can never forget a 
call that I received from him when I was a student at Dartmouth, and the 
gentle, earnest way in which he pressed upon me the interest that was nearest 
his heart. These and other things revealed to me the gentleness and purity of 
his spirit." From another tribute this is quoted: " He was loyal to church, 
country, and home, and never found wanting in any service that Providence 
permitted him to render. Above all, he was loyal to God, and bore with cheer- 
fulness for many years an amount of suffering few others knew. Surely the 
Lord honored him not only by success in His vineyard, but by setting him apart 
for the exemplification of patience, ' perfect and entire, wanting nothing.' " 

Mr. Peabody was married, January 27, 1869, to Mrs. Mary Sophia Coburn, 
of Ipswich, daughter of Rev. David Tenney Kimball and Dolly Varnum Co- 
burn, sister of Rev. David Tenney Kimball, of the Class of 1834, and widow 
of John Dunning Coburn, of Brunswick, Me. 

Mr. Peabody died of consumption, at Ipswich, Mass., November 6, 1895, 
aged seventy years, three months, and eight days. 

Nathaniel George Clark, D.D., LL.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Charles Clark, M.D., and Clarissa Boyden; born in Calais, Vt., 
January 18, 1825; prepared for college at the Washington County Grammar 
School, Montpelier, Vt. ; graduated at the University of Vermont, 1845; taught 
in the High School at Keene, N. H., 1845-47, and in the Montpelier school, 
1847-48; studied in this Seminary, 1848-49; was tutor in the University of 
Vermont, 1849-50; returned here for the middle year, 1850-51; graduated at 
Auburn Theological Seminary, 1852 ; spent several months, in company with 
his Auburn classmate and lifelong friend, Julius H. Seelye (a tribute to whom 



214 

he wrote for the Necrology of last year), in study under Miiller and Tholuck in 
Germany. He was professor of English Literature in the University of Ver- 
mont, 1852-57, of English Literature and Latin, 1857-63, being also librarian of 
the college, 1853-63. He was licensed by the Winooski (Vt.) Association, Octo- 
ber 16, 1855, and ordained to the ministry in Burlington, Vt., October 13, 1857. 
He was professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and English Literature in Union College 
from 1863 to 1865, when he was called to the service of the American Board, 
being associated one year with Dr. Rufus Anderson (Class of 1822), and in 1866 
succeeding him as Foreign Secretary. This office he held until compelled in 
1894 by failing strength to lay down its burden. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union College in 1865, 
and that of Doctor of Laws from the University of Vermont in 1875. He was 
for many years a trustee of Mt. Holyoke Seminary and College and of Welles- 
ley College, being president of the board in the latter institution. He published 
one text-book, The Elements of the English Language, in 1863. His spoken, 
written, and printed words in behalf of the missionary work are innumerable, 
and have gone out through all the earth. His wise and earnest labor for nearly 
thirty years in the sacred cause to which he had consecrated the energies of his 
strong intellect and warm heart gained the admiration, confidence, and love of 
the Christian community at home and of the great host of missionary workers 
abroad. 

Rev. E. E. Strong, D.D., Editorial Secretary of the Board (Class of 1855), 
writes : " Dr. Clark was a man grandly endowed, having fine intellectual powers, 
a sympathetic nature, and a commanding personal presence. After finishing 
his course of education, he spent some years as a teacher, and in this depart- 
ment of service he would have achieved eminence. But he had a longing for 
direct Christian service, and he gave his life to the interests of missions with a 
true consecration. No side issues absorbed his energies; he was ambitious 
only to promote the kingdom of God on the earth. His life and character and 
Christian devotion won the sincerest love of those who knew him, and his asso- 
ciates rejoice in the memory of a friend so true, a counselor so wise, a leader so 
able, and a Christian so saintly and pure." 

Rev. Wilson A. Farnsworth, D.D., of the Western Turkey Mission (Class 
of 1852), writes: " My love and admiration of Dr. Clark date from 1850, when 
we were classmates at Andover. I did not have the honor of being one of his 
most intimate friends, but with his natural abundance of love he took us all in 
and was beloved of all. When we were in the seminary I wrote brief sketches 
and, to some extent, prophecies of my classmates. Two or three years ago I 
was looking at them and was pleased to see on what a high pedestal I placed 
Clark. One thing I remember that I recorded was his remarkable 'power over 
an audience.' We had other men who were as strong as Clark in a debate, but 
somehow he always had the audience on his side. Before he had spoken half a 
dozen sentences people would forget that he was a disputant. They would say, 
' There is an honest man — we can believe what he says.' What can I say of 
him as the Foreign Secretary of the American Board ? I happened to be pres- 
ent at that meeting of the Board when he was chosen to fill that office, and 
remember with what humility he said, ' How can I take the place of such a man 
as Dr. Anderson ? ' He very soon won the confidence and the love of all the 
missionaries with whom he had official relations. His deep and tender sympathy 



215 

made each one of his correspondents feel that in him he had a true friend. He 
knew and shared with them their joys and sorrows. If he was compelled to 
communicate what would cause them sorrow, they knew that he had felt the 
sorrow first. His interest in them showed itself especially in the tender, fatherly 
regard which he had for their children when they were obliged to send them 
to America. Hence, in part at least, his interest in South Hadley and Welles- 
ley. His interest in the children of missionaries sometimes, I dare say often, 
showed itself in a very practical way. On one occasion when my daughter, now 
in Turkey, was at Mt. Holyoke he handed her fifty dollars, and, that she might 
feel less hesitancy in accepting it, said, 'I want to do it for old friendship's 
sake.' Very few know what sorrow he felt at resigning his connection with the 
Turkey missions. That sorrow was mutual. We felt that we were parting with 
a wise and loving friend. Indeed, his wisdom was only surpassed by his love. 
But 'over there' with what joy have the Goodells, the Blisses, and others wel- 
comed him ! " 

Dr. Clark was married, August 16, 1854, to Mary Bowland Reed, of Mont- 
pelier. Vt., daughter of Hon. Hezekiah H. Reed and Martha P. Barnard. She 
died February 11, 1859. He married, second, May 8, 1861, Elizabeth Sargent 
Worcester, daughter of Rev. Isaac R. Worcester, editor of the Missionary 
Herald (Class of 1835), and Mary Sophia Sargent. She survives him, with 
two daughters, their only son having died in 1891. 

Dr. Clark died of rheumatism, complicated with heart disease, at his 
home in West Roxbury, Mass., January 3, 1896, aged seventy years, eleven 
months, and fifteen days. 

CLASS OF 1853. 
David Bremner. 

Son of Dea. William Bremner and Helen Frazer; born in Keith, Banff- 
shire, Scotland, January 25, 1828; prepared for college at Gilmanton (N. H.) 
Academy; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1850; took the full course in this 
Seminary, 1850-53, and studied here as resident licentiate, 1854. He was or- 
dained pastor over the Second Church, in Rockport, Mass., May 2, 1855, re " 
maining there till 1864; pastor of Third Church, Plymouth, Mass., 1864-68; 
without charge, Boxford, Mass., 1868-70; pastor of First Church, Derry, N. H., 
1871-73; without charge, Boxford, Mass., 1874-75; acting pastor, Plaistow, 
N. H., 1875-79, and Raynham, Mass., 1879-81; clerk at the head of the Li- 
brary Department, Agricultural Department, 1882-85; acting pastor, Scituate, 
Mass., 1886-92; and in Hawley, Mass., 1894-95. 

His sermon upon the death of Mrs. Mary L. Gale was published in 1861. 
He represented Rockport in the legislature in 1863, and was chaplain of the 
House of Representatives in 1864. He served for many years as a trustee of 
Pinkerton Academy, Derry, N. H. Rev. Lysander Dickerman, D.D., of New 
York City (Class of 1856), sends this tribute: "When tarrying for a while 
in New Hampshire in 1853, Mr. Bremner called on me as a stranger. From 
that time to the day of his death we often met, and our friendship was warm 
and uninterrupted. At my ordination he was the one I chose to give me the 
right hand of fellowship, and afterwards, at his installation at Plymouth, I per- 
formed a similar service for him. In 187 1 we met in Germany as fellow stu- 



2l6 

dents, and the friendship of earlier years was cemented. We were at one time 
settled near each other, and I have heard him preach many times. His style 
was graceful and classic ; his sermons often contained passages of great beauty 
and discriminating thought; above all, his spirit was sweet, earnest, and evan- 
gelical. His sympathies were with his people in their trials; he participated 
in their joys and sorrows; he never lost sight of his one single aim — to bring 
old and young up to the life that is hid with Christ in God. Had his work 
been less placid and modest, his pastorates might have been longer and more 
extensively popular, but nobody was ever bound to his people by a stronger 
mutual affection than he. He was a critical Biblical scholar, keeping fresh 
through life his knowledge of Hebrew and Greek. A faithful counselor, a true 
friend, of pure, consistent character — the devoted pastor, who pointed the road 
to heaven and led the way. I have visited the home of his early boyhood, 
and have found there a universal esteem and an admiration for the manly Chris- 
tian qualities which he exhibited even in his youth. Men are still living who 
are proud that they ever aided him in his early struggles. Such a life has its 
reward in the grateful memories of those who have been won by his faithful 
ministries and by his gentle, loving spirit to the better life." 

Rev. Dr. Lyman Whiting, of East Charlemont, Mass. (Class of 1842), who 
was on the council when, "on a beautiful day in May, 1855, ne was ordained 
pastor of a newly formed church in Rockport by the sea, Professor Park preach- 
ing the sermon," writes of Mr. Bremner's service in the last year of his life in 
the hill country of Western Massachusetts : " His ministry was marked by care- 
fully stated truth, set forth by a well- taught mind and a glowing heart. His 
manner was quiet, with a warmth, almost pathos, of tone, and with an unusual 
purity of speech and thought." 

He was married, September 20, 1854, to Sarah Elizabeth Kimball, of Box- 
ford, Mass., daughter of Capt. Samuel Kimball and Elizabeth Sawyer. She 
survives him, with two sons and one daughter, their eldest son having died in 
youth. One son, a graduate of Yale and of Harvard Medical College, is a 
physician in New York City. Another studied at Yale and Boston University 
Law School. 

Mr. Bremner died of Bright's disease, at Boxford, Mass., December 9, 1895, 
aged sixty-seven years, ten months, and fourteen days. 

Henry Smith Huntington. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Henry Smith (Class of 1815) and Hannah Thomas Huntington; 
born in Camden, N. Y., June 30, 1828 ; his father dying when the son was a few 
days old, he was brought up by his grandfather, Hon. George Huntington, at 
Rome, N. Y., and his name changed from Henry Huntington Smith to Henry 
Smith Huntington ; prepared for college at Major Duff's Military Academy, 
New Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y. ; graduated at the College of New Jersey, 
1850; studied in this Seminary, 1850-51, and graduated at Princeton Seminary, 
1853; ordained by the Presbytery of Troy, November 15, 1858, and acting pas- 
tor at Caldwell, N. Y., 1857-62; lone City, Cal., 1863-64; Watsonville, Cal., 
1865-67; First Church, Wilmington, Del., 1868-69; of Reformed Church, 
Owasco, N. Y., 1869-70; of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Auburn, N. Y., 
1870-74; pastor-elect, Caldwell, N. Y., 1876-79; evangelist at Lake George, 



217 

N. Y., 1879. Transferring then his connection to the Episcopal Church, he 
was ordained deacon by Bishop Coxe, September 20, 188 1, and priest by the 
same, at Hammondsport, N. Y., September 28, 1882. He was rector of St. 
Mathias Church, East Aurora, N. Y., 1881-83; of Trinity Church, Lancaster, 
N. Y., 1883-87; of the Church of the Epiphany, Suspension Bridge, N. Y., 
1887-93 ; chaplain of the Church Charity Foundation, Buffalo, N. Y., 1893-95. 

The following is quoted from a tribute to Mr. Huntington in the Church 
Home Quarterly, of Buffalo : " In the number of saintly men who have minis- 
tered to the spiritual needs of the workers and beneficiaries of the Foundation, 
none have brought to the performance of their sacred duties a higher spiritual 
life and a more earnest zeal for the cause of our holy religion. He possessed 
rare mental gifts, which were enriched by patient study and broadened by ex- 
tensive travel. His deep religious and spiritual character made his ministra- 
tions peculiarly effective, and also acceptable and profitable to those whom he 
served. He was the ideal chaplain, and in the sphere to which the latter years 
of his life were devoted he exemplified all that was beautiful in the life and 
character of a Christian gentleman and of a faithful priest in the Catholic and 
Apostolic Church." 

Mr. Huntington was married, June 30, 1859, to Geneva Crosby, of Cald- 
well, N. Y., daughter of David Green Crosby and Eliza Marvin. She survives 
him, with two sons and two daughters, one of the sons, a business man in Buf- 
falo, being a lay reader in the Episcopal Church, and the other a graduate of the 
present year at Hobart College, in preparation for the ministry. 

Mr. Huntington died of pneumonia, at Buffalo, N. Y., December 22, 1895, 
aged sixty-seven years, five months, and twenty-two days. 



CLASS OF 1854. 

William Sewall. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of William Sewall and Sarah Ladd; born in Boston, December 14, 
1827; prepared for college at Roxbury Latin School and the Hopkins 
Classical School, Cambridge; graduated at Harvard College, 1849; studied in 
this Seminary, 1851-52 ; taught in Lewiston Falls Academy, Auburn, Me., 1849- 
1851 ; graduated at Bangor Theological Seminary, 1854 ; licensed to preach by the 
Penobscot (Me.) Association, 1853; returned to Andover as resident licentiate, 
1854-55. He was ordained in Cambridge, May 2, 1855 ; was successively pastor 
in Lunenburg, Vt., 1855-65, Norwich, Vt., 1865-76, and Littleton, Mass., 1877- 
1882; supplied temporarily in Saxton's River, Vt., 1882-83, Underhill, Vt., 1883, 
South Royalton, Vt., 1884, and Durham, Ct, 1885; pastor, Charlton, Mass., 
1886-90, Templeton, Mass., 1890-92; from 1892 resided with his son at St. 
Louis and Kansas City, Mo. 

Prof. Jotham B. Sewall, of South Braintree, Mass., a classmate of his 
cousin both here and at Bangor, writes thus of him : " He was constitutionally 
of a sunny and cheerful disposition, very unselfish, benevolent to his own harm. 
These traits, backed by a conscience quick to respond to a sense of duty, made 
him a loved friend and a welcomed pastor. His religious life began at a very 
early date— in his boyhood — and in its simplicity, purity, and steadfastness 
it was like the steady flowing stream increasing in volume to its end. To 



2l8 

preach the gospel of Jesus Christ was his love, and it was a gospel of love 
which he preached, both in word and in deed, to the end of his life." 

Mr. Sewall was married, May 16, 1855, to Caroline Harod Titcomb, of Lew- 
Iston, Me., daughter of Silas Titcomb and Hannah Sawyer ; she died December 
28, 1S57; married, second, October 20, 1858, Mrs. Mary Butters Davee, daugh- 
ter of James Folsom and Mary Butters, of Exeter, Me., and widow of Solomon 
T. Davee, of Portland, Me.; she died August 10, 1881 ; married, third, April 5, 
1883, Mrs. Mary Brewer Adams, daughter of Capt. Silas Martin and Margaret 
Crawford, of Wilmington, N. C, and widow of Samuel Adams, Jr., of Castine, 
Me.; she died October 12, 1892. He had one son and one daughter; the 
daughter died in infancy; the son, Rev. John Ladd Sewall, was a graduate of 
this Seminary in 1882. 

Mr. Sewall died of general anasarca, at Kansas City, Mo., May 15, 1896, 
aged sixty-eight years, five months, and one day. 



GLASS OP 1856. 

Amos Howe Johnson, M.D. 

Son of Samuel Johnson and Charlotte Abigail Howe ; born in Boston, 
August 4, 1831 ; prepared for college at Chauncey Hall School, Boston, Brook- 
field (Mass.) Family School, and Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at 
Harvard College, 1853; took the full course in this Seminary, 1853-56; licensed 
to preach by the Essex South Association at Salem, March 4, 1856. He was 
ordained over the church in Middleton, Mass., January 1, 1857, and remained 
there until the autumn of 1861. Retiring from the ministry on account of a 
throat trouble, he studied medicine in Harvard Medical School, 1862-65, sup- 
plementing ?his preparation a few years later by two years of study in Berlin 
and Vienna. He settled in Salem in 1866, and was a successful and beloved 
physician there until his death. 

I )r. Johnson was for many years secretary and for two years president of 
the Essex South District Medical Society. He was the orator of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in 1883, and its president, 1890-92, having also repre- 
sented it as a delegate to the International Medical Congress in Philadelphia in 
1876. He was an associate member of the Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society, 
for fifteen years one of the physicians of Salem Hospital, and consulting physi- 
cian of Danvers Asylum for the Insane from its establishment. He was secre- 
tary of the Essex Institute, member of the Salem School Board three years, 
president of the Essex Congregational Club two years, and for over twenty 
years a deacon of the South Church, Salem. While a resident of Middleton, in 
1862, he was a representative in the legislature. In 1875 ne delivered a course 
of lectures in this Seminary on "The Relations of Physiology to Religious 
Experience." He was also a frequent contributor to the reports of the Massa- 
chusetts State Board of Health. He was a brother of Rev. Francis H. Johnson, 
of Andover, of the Class of 1861. 

Rev. DeWitt S. Clark, I). I)., pastor of the Tabernacle Church, Salem 
(Class of 1868), writes : " Dr. Johnson was an auspicious illustration of the wis- 
dom of one's following his bent in his life work. His preparation for the minis- 
try was made in obedience to the wishes of his friends. He was successful in 



219 

his brief pastorate, where the members of his first and only parish still speak of 
him in terms of admiration and affection. Still, he felt he was not in his proper 
calling. Entering on the practice of medicine, after a thorough course of study 
at home, with the subsequent advantages of the best schools and hospitals of 
Europe, he became an enthusiast in his profession. His knowledge and skill 
and his open mind for the newer discoveries and methods in therapeutics gave 
him wide influence among his fellow practitioners. He was universally 
respected and much beloved by those among whom his services were rendered. 
Easily and without seeking the distinction, he became one of the 'first citizens.' 
This was in no small degree due to his uniform kindness, courtesy, and self- 
sacrificing interest in any and all who sought his aid, but also to his quiet, firm, 
and beautiful exhibition of Christian faith. Religion and science were in no 
sense inimical, as he knew each. His reasons for the belief he had in either 
were ready and weighty. He was ever willing to stand for the best things in 
the community and to lend all the influence of his word, no less than his exam- 
ple, to secure and maintain them. The church of Christ was dear to him, 
He magnified and adorned the office of deacon. He gladly gave time, money, 
counsel, and prayers for its upbuilding. The vacancy caused by his early death — 
not only in that of which he was a member, but in sister churches — is hard to 
fill." 

Dr. Johnson was married, September 22, 1859, to Frances Seymour 
Benjamin, of Brookfield, Mass., daughter of Rev. Nathan Benjamin, mission- 
ary in Turkey, and Mary Gladding Wheeler. She survives him, with four sons 
and two daughters. 

Dr. Johnson died of cancer of the stomach, May 12, 1896, aged sixty-five 
years, one month, and eight days. 

George Blagden Safford, D.D. 

Son of Dea. Daniel Safford and Mary (Smith) Boardman ; born in Boston, 
Mass., January 6, 1832; fitted for college at the Boston Latin School; gradu- 
ated at Yale College, 1852; taught in the Deaf and Dumb Institution, New 
York City, 1852-53; took the full course in this Seminary, 1853-56; licensed 
to preach by the Essex South Association, March 4, 1856 ; studied here as resi- 
dent licentiate, 1856-58. He was ordained at Northbridge, Mass., September 2, 
1858, and was acting pastor of the First Church in that town, 1858-60; pastor 
of the Third Church, Burlington, Vt., for twenty-two years, 1860-82 ; without 
charge, at Andover, 1882-84 ; secretary of American and Christian Union, New 
York, 1884-85; pastor, Elkhart, Ind., 1887-89; secretary of Bureau of Chari- 
ties, Brooklyn, N. Y., from 1890. 

Mr. Safford received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University 
of Vermont in 1878. His lifelong friend, Rev. Prof. J. Henry Thayer, D.D., 
of Cambridge (Class of 1857), sends the following tribute: "Having known 
Dr. Safford since the days when we recited our Latin Grammar together where 
the ' Parker House' now stands in Boston, and seen him for the last time only 
a few weeks before his death, I feel that — even after due abatement on the 
score of friendship — I have warrant for the statement that he was no ordinary 
man. A superficial acquaintance would not indorse this estimate of him, nor 
would a chance attendant on his pulpit ministrations. Indeed, it may be doubted 



220 

whether he made the wisest use of his gifts in becoming a preacher. A certain 
lack of resonance in his voice and of magnetic contagion in his public address 
made him fail at first of that appreciation which his thoughtful sermons and 
pastoral wisdom and courtesy were sure to win for him when he became better 
known. Had circumstances permitted him to carry out his early purpose of 
going as a missionary to India, his speculative acuteness, executive ability, 
untiring activity, and inventive ingenuity must have rendered him eminently 
successful. Even in his Seminary days his insight, boldness, and logical se- 
quaciousness as a thinker were generally recognized, and these gifts were sup- 
plemented by unusual mathematical aptitude and mechanical skill. Had he 
accepted the professorship of mathematics offered him in a New England col- 
lege, no one of his friends would have felt a misgiving about his success. In 
the oversight of the work of the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities, his punctilious 
accuracy and unsparing fidelity in things little and great have left a vacancy 
hard to fill. 

•' P.ut Dr. Safford deserved most honor and will be best remembered for 
his sterling character. As well might one turn the sun from its course as to 
induce him to swerve from a conviction of duty. Many a time did his loyalty 
to conscience become positively heroic. Striking instances could be given, were 
there room for them, in which he singly, and sometimes at considerable per- 
sonal peril, stood forth as the champion of morality and religion. And through 
all he commanded the respect even of his antagonists by his invariable fairness 
and courtesy. No opponent could ever accuse him of anything underhanded 
or dishonorable. He took defeat with sweetness, and bore abuse without man- 
ifested resentment. Seldom did he ever verge towards a lapse of temper. In 
short, in all that goes to make up a clear-headed, firm, courteous, faithful 
Christian manhood, he was exceptionally rich, and many of his survivors will 
join the writer in thanking God for the privilege of having known him." 

Dr. Safford was married, June 28, 1858, to Mary Ballard Gould, of An- 
dover, Mass., daughter of Dea. Abraham J. Gould and Mary (Ballard) Brown. 
She survives him, with one son and two daughters, one daughter having died, 
at the age of seventeen, August 27, 1883. 

Dr. Safford died of heart failure, following typhoid fever, at Brooklyn, 
N. Y., October 24, 1895, a g e ^ sixty-three years, nine months, and eighteen 
days. 



•James White. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Joseph White and Sophia Huntington; born in Hinsdale, Mass., 
July 9, 1828; prepared for college at Williston Seminary; graduated at Wil- 
liams College, 1851; instructor in Williston Seminary, 1851-53; in this Semi- 
nary, 1853-55, unt il disease of the eyes compelled him to discontinue study. 
He then went to Boston and engaged in business, being a salesman in the 
house of White, Brown & Davis until 1864, when he became a partner in the 
new firm of White, Brown & Co., importers, Boston and New York. From 
1886 to the time of his death he was the treasurer of Williams College and re- 
sided in Williamstown. 

He was one of the Boston representatives in the State legislature in 1876 
and 1877 and a member of the State Senate in 1878 and 1879. He served as a 



221 

deacon of Central Church, Boston, for thirty years and for a long period as 
superintendent of its Sunday school. Rev. Daniel Merriman, D.D., of Worces- 
ter, Mass. (Class of 1868), furnishes this tribute to the character of his friend: 
"Mr. White was from sturdy Berkshire stock, abounding in the best New Eng- 
land traits. This fine inheritance he early consecrated to the service of his 
Lord, and all his life he was characterized by a strong, quiet, and beautiful 
piety, ' rich in saving common sense,' unselfish, cheerful, sympathetic, and 
keenly alive to duty. In the preparatory school, in college, as a teacher, and 
in his short experience as a theological student he took high rank as a scholar, 
and would unquestionably have obtained great usefulness in the ministry had 
not his very zeal for the most thorough preparation brought on an affection of 
the eyes, which at once forced him to abandon all study and all his life disabled 
him even for much reading. This was a great disappointment, but it did not 
change the spirit or the fervor, but only the direction of his consecration. His 
whole life was the exercise of a genuine ministry. As a highly successful 
business man, as an influential legislator, as the trusted counselor and leader 
in all good causes, he was ' not slothful in business, fervent in spirit, serving 
the Lord.' 

11 He loved the church with singular devotion. For many years as deacon 
of the Central Church in Boston he was a model, and strangers recalled with 
gratitude the bright face and gracious manner with which he waited in God's 
house. The inner beauty and kindliness of his soul shone out in the discharge 
of the humblest duties. He was ' a lover of hospitality, a lover of good men.' 
His dearest friends were among ministers, missionaries, and teachers, and he 
was always an appreciative and generous helper to themand their interests. It 
was, however, as trustee and treasurer of his alma mater that Mr. White dur- 
ing the last ten years of his life rendered the most conspicuous service. The 
work suited him. He loved the college with a most loyal devotion. He threw 
himself into all its interests with abounding zeal, with unflagging industry, and 
with a tact and sympathy which were equal to all occasions. No duty was too 
small, no burden too great, no drudgery too severe, so long as the college could 
be benefited. He wore himself out in its service, and its recent prosperity is 
largely due to him. 

"James (as his intimates delighted to call him) was a loved and loving 
friend, abundant and fair in all the sweet and steadfast virtues that are of 
heaven; and when at last he calmly laid down his work, he had finished — 
though not as he had once expected, in the pulpit and pastoral office — a noble 
ministry." 

Mr. White was married, January 22, 1856, to Harriet Cornelia Kittredge, 
of Hinsdale, Mass., daughter of Dr. Benjamin Franklin Kittredge and Harriet 
Marsh, who survives him, with one son and one daughter. 

He died of anaemia, at Williamstown, Mass., September 3, 1895, aged 
sixty-seven years, one month, and twenty-four days. 

CLASS OF 1857. 
Sylvester Dana Storrs. 

Son of Dea. Jesse Storrs and Hannah Hyde ; born in Virgil, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 11, 1820; prepared for college at Cortland (N. Y.) Academy; graduated 



222 

at Dartmouth College, 1851 ; taught a private school at West Duxbury, Mass., 
1S51-54; took the full course in this Seminary, 1854-57; licensed by the Mid- 
dlesex South Association at Framingham, Mass., January 13, 1857; went with 
three of his classmates, Richard Cordley, Grosvenor C. Morse, and Roswell D. 
Parker, to Kansas under the Home Missionary Society; ordained at Quindaro, 
January 27, 1858, and remained until 1862, being also acting pastor in Wyandotte, 
185S-59; acting pastor, Atchison, 1862-68; acting pastor in Quindaro and home 
missionary in that region, 1869-72 ; superintendent of Home Missionary Soci- 
ety for Kansas, with residence at Topeka, 1872-75 ; district superintendent of 
American Bible Society for Kansas, 1885-91 ; afterwards without charge, still 
residing at Topeka. 

Mr. Storrs was a trustee of Washburn College in Kansas from 1878 to 1883. 
Rev. Richard Cordley, D.D., a Seminary classmate and fellow laborer for many 
years in Kansas, writes : " He entered Andover Seminary in 1854, and besides 
more than maintaining himself he taught in two Sunday schools, preached often 
in neglected neighborhoods, and engaged in various other missionary and benev- 
olent work. In his junior year, when the Kansas troubles were exciting general 
interest, he suggested the idea of a Kansas band. A Kansas prayer meeting 
was held in his room every Wednesday evening for nearly two years. On his 
graduation he and three classmates went at once to Kansas. He was ordained 
at Quindaro by the first council that ever assembled in the territory. In 1862 
he found the church at Atchison worshiping in the basement of an unfinished 
building, the members few, and the congregation small. The town was orig- 
inally a pro-slavery town, and the church was nicknamed the 'nigger church; ' 
in five years he lifted it out of the basement into a finished audience room, and 
made it a strong and influential church. The twelve years of his service as 
superintendent of missions may be considered the great work of his life. Dur- 
ing this period Kansas made her greatest growth. New communities were being 
established in all directions. He was always on the alert, and spared neither 
time nor toil to meet the demands of his immense field. His splendid physique 
stood him in good stead. His custom was to travel nights, that he might have 
the day for labor. He thus was able to reach widely separated fields. In a 
single week he would sometimes reach fields three hundred miles apart. When 
he entered the service there was scarcely a church in the western two thirds of 
the State; when he left the work that whole region was dotted over with 
churches. When he began there were seventy-eight Congregational churches 
in Kansas; when he closed there were one hundred and eighty-nine. Few men 
could have endured the tremendous strain that was continually upon him. In 
the peculiar and difficult work of his position his fine judgment was of great 
service. In combining the diverse elements of a frontier town his practical 
good sense never failed him, nor his other marked characteristics of tireless 
energy, unflinching fidelity, and unfaltering faith. Such a man needs no monu- 
ment but the work he did, and no memorial but the life he led." 

Rev. Dr. L. H. Cobb, of New York City, another Seminary classmate, 
writes : " He was one of the most devoted, unselfish, and diligent men on the 
frontier." 

He was married, November 12, 1857, to Fanny J. Terry, of Union ville, 
Ohio, daughter of Rev. Parshall Terry and Fannie Buel Howell. She survives 
him, with two sons and two daughters, two children having died in infancy; one 



223 

of the daughters was for several years an instructor in Washburn College ; the 
other and one of the sons are practicing physicians in Kansas. 

He died of pneumonia, at Topeka, Kan., March 7, 1896, aged seventy-five 
years, five months, and twenty-six days. 



GLASS OF 1859. 

Edward Alfred Smith. 

Son of Isaac Edward Smith and Emily Walker ; born in East Woodstock, 
Ct., July 22, 1835 ; prepared for college at the Russell School, New Haven, Ct. ; 
graduated at Yale College, 1856; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1856-57, and 
graduated at this Seminary, 1859 ; licensed to preach by the New Haven East 
Association, at Madison, Ct., May 25, 1858; studied in the University of Gottin- 
gen, i860, and University of Halle, 1861-62. Returning to this country in the 
midst of the War of the Rebellion, he enlisted as a volunteer in putting down the 
New York riots in 1863, and was in the service of the United States Sanitary 
Commission in Virginia in 1864. He was ordained at West Springfield, Mass., 
November 13, 1865, and was acting pastor of the Second Church, Chester, Mass., 
which he had already been supplying for several months, until 1874. He was 
then pastor in Farmington, Ct., for nearly fourteen years, resigning his charge 
there in December, 1887, and removing his residence in the spring of 1888 to 
Hartford, Ct. , where he remained until his death. 

Mr. Smith was a Fellow of Yale College from 1889, and also served for sev- 
eral years on the Board of Directors of the Connecticut Home Missionary Soci- 
ety. His only publications were a sketch of President Porter, of Yale, and a 
paper on the relation of the church at Farmington to its daughter churches. 
The following tribute is quoted from an article in the Hartford Courant, written 
by Rev. George L. Walker, D.D., of Hartford, Ct. (Class of 1858, and one of 
the Seminar^' Board of Visitors) : " The bald outline of the main visible facts 
of Mr. Smith's history conveys but little impression of his sweetness, the grace 
and benevolence with which such facts were illuminated and beautified to all 
who were brought into intimate contact with the life to which they belonged. 
Extremely modest and almost diffident, Mr. Smith had resources, scholarship, 
and ability which a chance acquaintance would hardly surmise, but which were, 
to those who knew him well, clearly recognized and rejoiced in. A man of most 
tender sensibilities, his pastorates were marked by the best qualities of ministe- 
rial service ; and the hearts of the people to whom he ministered are full of lov- 
ing memories of his gentle faithfulness. As a preacher he was clear, instructive, 
tender, and persuasive. He was remarkably uplifting and helpful in prayer. 
His own faith and hope had power to a singular degree to uplift the hope and 
faith of others." 

Mr. Smith was married, March 3, 1865, to Mrs. Melissa (Knox) Heath, of 
Chester, Mass., daughter of Charles William Knox and Olive Clark, and widow 
of Theodore Lyman Heath. She survives him, with two sons, one of whom is 
a graduate of Yale, the other in course of preparation for college. 

Mr. Smith died of heart disease, at Hartford, Ct., October 2, 1895, aged 
sixty years, three months, and four days. 



224 

GLASS OF 1862. 

Daniel Augustus Miles. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Willard Moore Miles and Alice Browning, and brother of Rev. 
James B. Miles, D.D., of the Class of 1853; born in Rutland, Mass., April 2, 
1835; fitted for college at Worcester (Mass.) High School; graduated at Yale 
College, 1858, and at the Yale Divinity School, 1861 ; licensed by the New 
Haven Central Association, i860; resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1861-62. 
While filling a temporary engagement to preach in Maine in 1863, he enlisted 
in the 8th Regiment of Maine Volunteers and was in active service until 
wounded in battle near Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 20, 1864. He was then in 
hospitals at Hampton, Va., and Portsmouth Grove, R. I. While on furlough 
at home, he was ordained at the Central Church, Worcester, July 27, 1864, in 
expectation of appointment as army chaplain. Returning to the army in the 
following December, he acted as chaplain, though still a private in the service, 
until he was commissioned in February, 1865, as chaplain of the 4th Regiment, 
New Jersey Infantry, and served as such until his discharge, July 9, 1865. He 
was then in the employ of the American Missionary Association, among the 
freedmen at Woodstock and Arlington, Va., 1865-66, and of the Home Mis- 
sionary Society, at Forest Grove, Ore., 1866-68. His health unfitted him for 
subsequent ministerial service, and he lived in retirement at Auburn and West- 
boro, Mass., until his death. 

He was married, December 25, 1867, to Elizabeth Waterman Wilcox, of 
Providence, R. I., daughter of Isaac Wilcox and Clarissa Brownell, who sur- 
vives him. Their only child, a daughter, died in 1882, at the age of twelve 
years. 

He died of apoplexy, at Westboro, Mass., June 10, 1895, a S ec * sixty years, 
two months, and eight days. 

GLASS OF 1863. 

James Wakeman Hubbell, D.D. 

Son of Dea. Wakeman Hubbell and Julia Lynes; born in Wilton, Ct., 
March 29, 1835; prepared for college at Wilton Academy; graduated at Yale 
College, 1857 ; taught in Stamford and Norfolk, Ct., 1857-59; studied in Union 
Seminary, 1859-60, and in this Seminary, 1860-61 and 1862-63 ; acting pastor, 
Plainville, Ct., 1S63-64 ; ordained over church in Milford, Ct., September 21, 
1864, and remained there five years; pastor of College St. Church, New Haven, 
Ct., 1869-76; acting pastor of North Church, Portsmouth, N. H., 1877-79; 
pastor of First Church, Danbury, Ct., 1879-86; pastor of First Church, Mans- 
field, Ohio, 1886-96. 

Mr. Hubbell was the brother of Rev. Henry L. Hubbell, D.D., president 
of Lake Charles College, Louisiana (Class of 1859). He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Marietta College, 1890. There has not been time 
since hearing of his death to secure a tribute from any of his classmates, but 
the testimony of the memorial services at Mansfield and the resolutions of the 
Ministerial Association of the city warmly eulogize his character and work. An 
obituary notice in the Waterbury (Ct.) American, by Rev. J. G. Davenport, 
says: "A man of graceful speech and native eloquence, always knowing the 



225 

right thing to say, and saying it, bright and humorous and impressive, he was 
an acceptable speaker, not only in the pulpit, but outside of it. During the 
college vacations the announcement that James Hubbell would speak always 
crowded the place with his old friends. When in his later years he preached 
in the pulpit of his native town, we who were younger looked up to him as a 
marvel and a model. His especial strength lay in the possession of a most 
genial and affectionate spirit. Excellent as a preacher, it was as a pastor that 
he was preeminent, by his personal influence winning to the high standards of 
duty and privilege that were his own. Few ministers of the gospel are more 
generally and deeply loved than was he." 

Dr. Hubbell was married, September 25, 1861, to Mary Wing Gregory, of 
Wilton, Ct., daughter of Charles Gregory and Harriet Clark, and sister of 
Rev. Lewis Gregory (Class of 1868). She survives him, with one son and 
three daughters. 

Dr. Hubbell died of diabetes, at Mansfield, Ohio, May 19, 1896, aged 
sixty-one years, one month, and twenty days. 



CLASS OF 1864. 
Daniel Denison. 

Son of Daniel Denison and Susan Cunningham; born in Hampton, Ct., 
September 4, 1838; fitted for college at Williston Seminary; graduated at Yale 
College, i860; taught in Birdsboro, Pa., one year; studied in Union Theolog- 
ical Seminary, 1861-62, and in this Seminary, 1862-64; licensed by Essex South 
Association, Salem, Mass., February 2, 1864. His last year in the Seminary 
was broken somewhat by a service of six weeks as a delegate of the Christian 
Commission at Camp Parole, Maryland, and by malarial sickness contracted 
while in that service. He was in feeble health for several years, although for a 
part of the time traveling as a canvassing agent for the New York Tribune, ex- 
tending his travels as far as Texas. He was ordained, December 30, 1873, as 
pastor of the Second Church, Middle Haddam, Ct., and remained there until 
1884. He preached in Hartford, Wis., one year, 1884-85, was acting pastor in 
Hampton, Ct., 1885-89, and pastor in Pomfret Centre, Ct., from 1889 to the 
time of his death. 

His classmate, Rev. George L. Gleason, of Haverhill, Mass., writes of him : 
14 Denison was a man of rare purity and sweetness. He was never a man of 
vigorous health, but his humble piety, gentle spirit, and uniform fidelity to duty 
made him a most delightful and helpful companion and friend." Another class- 
mate, Rev. S. L. Blake, D.D., of New London, Ct., writes : 4I I knew him as a 
student and later as one of the choicest spirits. He was full of the Holy Ghost, 
and endeared himself to all who knew him, especially to his own people." 

Mr. Denison was married, September 25, 1872, to Augusta Maria Bryant, of 
Springfield, Mass. (although at that time a worker in an Episcopal mission in 
New York City), daughter of Samuel Wilder Bryant and Susan Maria Burnap. 
She died in Middle Haddam, Ct., December 22, 1873. 

He died of sarcoma of liver, at Pomfret, Ct., July 7, 1895, a 8 ed fift y- slx 
years, ten months, and three days. 



226 



Franklin Burroughs Norton. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Allen Norton and Huldah Thomas; born in Ware, Mass., March 5, 
1833 ; fitted for college at Cambridge (Mass.) High School and at Kimball Union 
Academy, Meriden, N. II. ; graduated at Amherst College, 1856; in business 
at the West, 1856-57 ; taught in Missouri and Tennessee, 1857-61 ; studied in 
this Seminary, 1S61-62; graduated at Chicago Theological Seminary, 1864; 
ordained, July II, 1864, over the church in Kenosha, Wis., remaining there two 
years; acting pastor at Janesville, Wis., 1866-69; Oshkosh, Wis., 1869-70; 
resided there, without charge and in feeble health, 1870-76; in employ of 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, 1876-91, with residence at Burling- 
ton, Wis.; in business there, 1891-94; went to California for his health in 1894, 
and there died. 

Mr. Norton is warmly spoken of by his classmates. He was a useful 
teacher in the South until his service was ended by the exigencies of war, and 
he succeeded in escaping from the rebel cavalry in which he had been forced to 
drill and make his way to the Union lines in Kentucky. He was a useful man 
in the ministry until ill health compelled him to retire from its service. 

Mi. Norton married, July 6, 1865, Harriet A. Dyer, of Burlington, Wis., 
daughter of Dr. Edward G. Dyer and Anna Eliza Morse. She survives him, 
with seven children, one of whom graduated at Amherst College in 1893. 

Mr. Norton died of tuberculosis of lungs, at Fernando, Cal., April 13, 
1895, aged sixty- two years, one month, and eight days. 



CLASS OF 1868. 

Amos Franklin Shattuck. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Amos Shattuck and Margaret Ball; born in Hollis, N. H., July 9, 
1832; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H.; grad- 
uated at Amherst College, 1859, and at Union Theological Seminary, 1862 ; 
he preached in Charlestown, N. H., 1863-64; in Surrey, N. H., 1864-66; 
resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1866-68; preached in Durham, Me., 1867- 
1868, having been ordained in Durham, June 3, 1868 ; acting pastor, Worcester, 
Vt., 1870-71 ; preached in Hatchville, Barnstable County, Mass., 1871-72; with- 
out charge at Hollis, N. H., 1872-83; farmer, New Ipswich, N. H., 1883-91 ; 
in Concord, N. H., 1891-95. 

Mr. Shattuck was on the School Board of New Ipswich four years. 
He was an excellent scholar and a spiritually minded man, but was lack- 
ing in some of the elements necessary for success in the profession for which 
he had with much pains and self-denial fitted himself. The last four years of 
his life were spent in the hospital for the insane. 

Mr. Shattuck was married, June 11, 1883, to Mary Caroline Locke, of New 
Ipswich, N. H., daughter of William Dana Locke and Miranda Adams, who 
survives him. 

He died of consumption, at New Ipswich, N. H., November 27, 1895, a g ed 
sixty-three years, four months, and eighteen days. 



227 

GLASS OF 1870 



Charles Ware Park. 



Son of Rev. Calvin Emmons Park (Class of 1835, whose death was recorded 
in the Necrology of 1S95) and Harriet Turner Pope; born in North Andover, 
Mass., September 8, 1845; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1867 ; studied in Bangor Theological Seminary, 
1S67-6S, and in this Seminary, 1S6S-70 ; licensed by the Essex North Associa- 
tion, October 20, 1S69. He was ordained as a foreign missionary in the College 
Chapel at Amherst, Mass., June 15, 1870, and was in the service of the Ameri- 
can Board in the Marathi Mission, Western India, until 1SS1. Was pastor of 
the Howard Avenue Church, New Haven, Ct., 1883-S5, and of the Second 
Church of Derby, Ct. (Birmingham), 1SS5-94. He had just commenced his 
duties as pastor of the Unity Church (Unitarian), Pittsfield, Mass., at the time 
of his death. 

While in India he edited the Indian Evangelical Review, a quarterly maga- 
zine, and also the English portion of an Anglo-Indian weekly paper published in 
Bombay. For several years he compiled and published a large almanac in the 
Marathi language, which included many original and valuable articles on 
scientific, historical, and religious subjects. He was secretary of the Bombay 
Tract and Book Company, 1S74-76. His friend and Seminary classmate, Rev. 
Amorv H. Bradford, D.D., of Montclair, N. J., sends this tribute: "It has 
been said of Mr. Park that he began to preach in the vernacular nine months 
a'ter landing — something almost unparalleled in the history of mission work in 
that country. In addition to all his other duties he delivered many lectures 
among the English-speaking Brahmins. At the end of eleven years, worn out 
with overwork, he returned to this country for well-earned rest, but his heart 
was always in the missionary field, and he was never so happy as when preach- 
ing and teaching in India. His was a rare and noble spirit. The late Dr. N. G. 
Clark, of the American Board, once said that he never knew an abler or more 
consecrated missionary than Charles W. Park. More than one competent to 
speak has since then made the same statement. He was a tireless student, a 
loyal friend, a man with the highest sense of honor, and with intellectual hon- 
esty and moral earnestness which are seldom surpassed. Although, for reasons 
which need not here be mentioned, he cast in his lot at last with the Unitarians, 
he remained the same loyal, earnest, and devoted preacher of righteousness and 
of the gospel of Jesus Christ which he had been in his earlier years. He was 
essentially a missionary, but he was no mere preacher; he was a scholar — a 
man who took large views and was fitted to be a leader. In the prime of his 
powers he was called from the ministry which he loved, leaving an honorable 
record in every field in which he had worked. His name will be cherished alike 
by his family and his friends. Perhaps it is enough to say that as a scholar and 
a thinker Charles W. Park was a worthy nephew of his distinguished uncle, 
whose name has for so many years been associated with Andover Seminary." 

He was married, June 16, 1S70, to Anna Maria Ballantine, daughter of 
Rev. Henry Ballantine (Class of 1834) and Elizabeth Darling, of the Marathi 
Mission. She survives him, with one son (Vale College, 1S96) and five daugh- 
ters. 

Mr. Park died of consumption, at Pittsfield, Mass., November 24, 1S05. 
aged fifty years, two months, and sixteen days. 



228 

Arthur Brooks, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of William Gray Brooks and Mary Ann Phillips; born in Boston, 
.. June ii, 1845; fittecl for college in the Boston Public Latin School; grad- 
uated at Harvard College, 1867 ; studied in this Seminary, 1867-68, and gradu- 
ated at the Protestant Episcopal Divinity School in Philadelphia, 1870; was or- 
dained deacon in Trinity Church, Boston, by Bishop Eastburn, June 25, 1870, 
and ordained priest in Trinity Church, Williamsport, Pa., by Bishop Stevens, 
October 12, 1870. He was rector of Trinity Church, Williamsport, 1870-72; of 
St. James Church, Chicago, 1872-75; of the Church of the Incarnation, New 
York City, 1S75-95. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of New 
York in 1S91, and from the College of New Jersey in the same year. He was 
chairman of the Board of Trustees of Barnard College, New York City, and 
one of the Board of Overseers of the Divinity School in Philadelphia. He was 
also a member of Victoria Institute, or Philosophical Society, of Great Britain. 
He had published a volume of sermons, The Life of Christ in the World, and a 
memorial sermon written upon Phillips Brooks. 

Dr. r>ro>>ks was of honored Andover ancestry, his mother having been a 
granddaughter of Judge Samuel Phillips, the founder of Phillips Academy, who 
was the grandson of Rev. Samuel Phillips, the first pastor of the South Church, 
Andover. He was a brother of Right Rev. Phillips Brooks, Bishop of Massa- 
chusetts, and of Rev. John Cotton Brooks (Class of 1876). Rev. Charles C. 
Tiffany, D.D., Archdeacon of the Diocese of New York (Class of 1854), fur- 
nishes the following tribute : " Rev. Arthur Brooks, D.D., was at the time of 
his death one of the most prominent and influential ministers of the Episcopal 
communion. The promise given by his energetic and large-minded administra- 
tion of the parish of St. James, in Chicago, was more than fulfilled in his twenty 
years' labor as rector of the Church of the Incarnation, New York City. He 
made his parish strong, reliable, generous, and influential. He made his pulpit 
a synonym for intellectuality suffused with spirituality. There was no abler 
preacher of any denomination in the city, though he was not a popular preacher 
in the common acceptation of the term. One always gained some fresh thought 
and aspiration from his sermons, and an air of Christian manliness always sur- 
rounded him. He was a power without as within his church. In the Evangel- 
ical Alliance, the City Mission, the Church Congress, and Barnard College he 
was a conspicuous factor. He stood in the front rank of citizens as well as 
of divines. It is a matter of lasting regret that he did not live to complete the 
biography of his distinguished brother, Phillips Brooks, whose charm he may 
not have fully shared, but to whom as a thinker and man of affairs he was an 
equal. Had he lived longer his fame would have been greater, as he was ripen- 
ing fast both in character and power, but his work could not have been more 
healthful or helpful had he lived to be fourscore. " 

Dr. P, rooks was married, October 17, 1872, to Elizabeth Willard, of Wil- 
liamsport, Pa., daughter of William Waldo Willard and Sarah Maynard, who 
survives him. 

He died at sea, on the steamship Fulda, bound from Southampton to New 
York, July 10, 1895, a 8 e< ^ ^ty y ears ar >d twenty-nine days. 



229 

GLASS OP 1871. 

Henry Swift De Forest, D.D. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Lee DeForest and Cynthia Storrs Swift; born in South Edmeston, 
N. Y., March 17, 1833; prepared for college at Delaware Literary Institute, 
Franklin, N. Y. ; graduated at Yale College, 1857 ; studied in Yale Divinity 
School, 1857-58; tutor in Beloit College, 1858-60; continued theological study 
in Union Seminary, 1860-61 ; tutor in Yale College, 1861-63; ordained as army 
chaplain in New Haven, Ct., August 2, 1863, an d served as such in the nth 
Connecticut Regiment, 1863-65. He was pastor of Plymouth Church in Des 
Moines, Io., 1866-70; Council Bluffs, Io., 1871-77; Waterloo, Io., 1877-78; 
financial secretary of Iowa College, 1878-79; president of Talladega College in 
Alabama from 1879 unt 'l his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Beloit College in 1881, 
and was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence. He found time in his busy life to write and publish several popular and 
useful tracts. Rev. George W. Andrews, D.D. (Class of 1867), the coworker 
of President Andrews in Talladega College as principal of the theological de- 
partment, sends this tribute: "My acquaintance with Dr. DeForest began in 
1879, when he came here to assume the duties of president of Talladega College, 
and continued until his death. We received from him at once the impression 
that he was a man of self-reliance and strength beyond the average. Tall, erect, 
and alert in his movements, he was a commanding figure among his fellow men. 
Seventh in a class of one hundred and three in Yale University, he was strong 
intellectually. While a careful student, he was no recluse, but rather a man of 
practical affairs, devoting himself to the administrative work of the college. 
His morning chapel talks were full of warnings to the evil-doer and of tearful 
exhortations to walk in the path of virtue. He sought to develop in pupils self- 
reliance, courage, pluck, and all manly and Christian qualities. With great 
earnestness he exhorted to repentance and faith in Christ. He was a preacher 
of more than ordinary power, always speaking extempore out of a full heart. 
He was vivid and imaginative rather than doctrinal, expecting immediate results 
in the conversion of souls. As a platform speaker he seldom failed to secure 
the applause of his audience. He was gifted in prayer. He often rose early in 
the morning for a quiet hour with God in his study. The Bible was his daily 
companion. He was a warm friend of those he loved, happy in his home, de- 
sired long life, and longed to ' die in the harness.' He worked earnestly to the 
end, the fatal apoplectic stroke cutting him off in a moment from active service." 

Dr. DeForest was married, August 25, 1869, to Anna Margarette Robbins, 
of Muscatine, Io., daughter of Rev. Alden B. Robbins, D.D. (Class of 1843), 
and Eliza Catharine Hough. She survives him, with two sons and one daugh- 
ter ; one son graduates this year at Yale, and the other is in preparation for 
entrance; the daughter is a graduate of Northfield Seminary. 

Dr. DeForest died of apoplexy, at Talladega, Ala., January 27, 1896, aged 
sixty- two years, nine months, and ten days. 



230 
GLASS OF 1875. 

John Wilmath Colwell. 

Son of Rev. John Wilmath Colwell and Hannah Wall Wing; born in 
Providence, R. I., May 3, 1847 ; prepared for college at Mowry and Goff's Clas- 
sical School, Providence; graduated at Brown University, 1872; took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1872-75; licensed to preach by the Andover Associa- 
tion, meeting in the Chapel at South Lawrence, June 23, 1874. He was ordained 
pastor of the West Church, Concord, N. H., September 22, 1875, anc * remained 
there four years ; acting pastor, Pittsfield, N. H., 1879-81 ; of the Rockville 
Church, South Peabody, Mass., and the branch church at West Peabody, 
1SS1-S7; installed pastor in Barrington, R. I., July 20, 1887, remaining such 
until his death. 

Mr. Charles E. Steele, of New Britain, Ct., his classmate, room-mate, and 
intimate friend while in the Seminary, writes of him : " His relations and mine 
at Andover were very close, as with others we had charge of the Holt district 
prayer meetings and the last year we roomed together. I knew him as abso- 
lutely genuine, always manly, full of zeal to win souls, full of enthusiasm in 
every department of his work, painstaking and conscientious in his studies, of 
fine social gifts, his leading voice in singing and the playing of his own accom- 
paniments making him an unusually effective leader in prayer meetings and 
social gatherings. He had the right spirit to attract men to the church and to 
Christ. Without any ministerial air, he was sure to commend the ministry of 
Christ by his manliness, his zeal, and his interest in everything that affected the 
public welfare. Since graduation our paths have diverged, so that we have not 
kept up acquaintance for the twenty years out of Andover." 

The compiler of these sketches is sure that he represents his classmates 
who have kept up their acquaintance with Mr. Colwell in saying that what he 
promised to be as a student he proved to be as a minister. Though modest and 
unassuming, he was always genuine and true, always firm and faithful for the 
right. He hated the works of unrighteousness and fought, against them. He 
loved whatsoever things are honest, and just, and pure, and sought to maintain 
them, both in the pulpit and in the community. The church buildings at South 
and West Peabody attest his activity and success in that pastorate. In every 
pastorate he helped to frame the lives of Christian men and women into the 
building "which groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord." His early and 
unexpected death is a great loss to his loving people at Barrington and to the 
Christian cause. How little we thought in 1875 tnat Burr and Colwell, so 
strong and hearty, would be the first to go ! 

Mr. Colwell was married, September 30, 1875, to Caroline Blanchard Holt, 
of Andover, daughter of Samuel B. Holt and Caroline L. Abbott. She survives 
him, with three sons, one of whom had just entered Brown University, for 
which the others were also in preparation. A daughter died in infancy. 

Mr. Colwell died of congestive malarial chill, at Barrington, R. I., March 
20, 1896, aged forty-eight years, ten months, and seventeen days. 

William Parmenter Bennett. ( Resident Licentiate. ) 

Son of Josiah Kendall Bennett and Lucinda Hall Nutting; born in Groton, 
Mass., November 6, 1836; fitted for college at Lawrence Academy, Groton, and 



231 

Phillips Exeter Academy; graduated at Williams College, 1862, having entered 
the sophomore class; was principal successively of high schools in Abington 
and Millbury, Mass., 1862-64 ; went to Bradford, Io., in 1865, and founded the 
Bradford Academy there, remaining its principal for five years. He was or- 
dained, December 8, 1870, in Mason City, Io., and was pastor there until 1874; 
then came East and studied in this Seminary as resident licentiate, 1874-75; 
pastor of church in Lyndon, Vt., 1875-80; of church in Ames City, Io., 1880- 
1884 ; of church in Crete, Neb., from 1884 until his death. 

At his funeral, which was largely attended by the people of the vicinity, by 
students, and by pastors and educators from a distance, President David B. 
Perry, of Doane College, with whose interests Mr. Bennett had been thor- 
oughly identified, said of him : " He was born in an academy town, fitted for 
college in academies, taught in academies, and to the last was a great lover 
of that favorite New England institution. His presentation of truth was that 
of a carefully trained teacher. He proceeded logically in the development of 
his pulpit theme, was painstaking in his preparation, and the elaboration of 
his subject was admirable. He was a lover of students, and sought to help 
them in every way. He knew what it was to contend with great difficulties 
in getting an education, and made others feel that they could struggle through 
to the end and so accomplish great things for themselves and the world. He 
believed most thoroughly in careful training, and had unbounded enthusiasm 
for Christian education, whether in academy or college. The emphasis that 
he put upon the Christian element in education cannot be too highly praised. 
Fidelity characterized him with reference to all public appointments. As col- 
lege trustee he gave time and thought without stint. He was carefully pre- 
pared for pulpit ministrations. No one was more regular in attending Sabbath 
school conventions, local and general associations, and church councils, though 
such attendance involved large expenditure of thought and time and means." 
Rev. Lewis Gregory, of Lincoln, Neb. (Class of 1868), writes in a similar vein : 
"Bennett was a royal good fellow. All who know his work emphasize his 
educational instincts. He was the friend and confidant of students, and was 
able to get many started towards a liberal education and to help them through." 

Mr. Bennett was married, August 4, 1864, to Harriet Irene Blodgett, of 
Randolph, Vt., daughter of Eli Blodgett and Irene Blodgett. One daughter 
died in infancy and one at the age of eighteen. Three sons and two daughters 
survive, three of whom are graduates of Doane College; one son is intending 
to enter the ministry. 

Mr. Bennett died of pneumonia, in Crete, Neb., March 9, 1896, aged fifty- 
nine years, four months, and three days. 



CLASS OP 1882. 

Stephen Weston Webb. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Joseph Cushing Webb and Martha Weston ; born in Skowhegan, 
Me., January 10, 1842 ; removed with his family to Illinois in childhood, and 
prepared for college in the high schools of Dover and Buda in that State; 
studied one year in Antioch College, Ohio, and then entered Amherst College, 
graduating in 1866; took his theological course in Chicago Seminary, 1866-69; 



232 

ordained by the Presbytery of Oakland at Alameda, Cal., April 19, 1870; pas- 
tor at Alameda, 1869-72; pastor at Great Falls, now Somersworth, N. H., 
1873-81 ; without charge, 1881-83, spending one year in study here as resident 
licentiate, 1881-82; editor of New England Home Journal, Worcester, Mass., 
1883-88 ; pastor South Hadley Falls, Mass., 1888-94- 111 health then compelled 
him to resign his charge, and he spent his last year in foreign travel and in the 
South. 

Rev. Henry Hyde, his successor at Somersworth, N. H., writes of him in 
the Congregationalist : " He threw his whole heart and soul into his work. The 
keynote of his ministry was expressed to the church committee in Great Falls, 
• I had rather be a successful minister of Jesus Christ than king of Great Brit- 
ain.' ... As a preacher Mr. Webb was eminently practical, presenting truth in 
a pointed, clear, and pleasing manner, the natural result of which was large 
congregations wherever he preached. He strove unobtrusively to live the gos- 
pel he taught and to carry into his daily life something of the great Master's 
spirit. He was a gifted, devoted Christian." 

Mr. Webb was married, November 7, 187 1, to Martha Stevenson Boyden, 
of Beverly, daughter of Wyatt Clark Boyden, M.D., and Lydia Lincoln. She 
survives him, with two children, one child having died soon after the father. 

Mr. Webb died of tuberculosis, following the grip, at Asheville, N. C, 
November 22, 1895, aged fifty-three years, ten months, and twelve days. 

GLASS OF 1893. 

Edwin Davidson Blanchard. 

Son of Rev. Silas Morrison Blanchard (Class of 1849) an< ^ Eleanor Jane 
Bickford; born in Wentworth, N. H., April 14, 1859; prepared for college at 
Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1890, having 
previously studied one year at Brown University and two years at Williams Col- 
lege ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1890-93; licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting in Bartlet Chapel, Andover; May 2, 1892. He 
supplied the church in North Groton, N. H., in the summer of 1891, and in 
Wentworth, N. II., 1892-93; was ordained at Wentworth, July 19, 1893, but 
after a few months of earnest labor was taken ill with typhoid fever, and in the 
autumn of 1894 was compelled to seek a change of climate in California, where 
he spent the last year of his life. His twin brother, Rev. Edward B. Blanchard, 
of Brookfield, Mass., was a graduate of the Seminary in 1892. 

Rev. Fred E. Winn, of Bennington, N. H. (Class of 1893), writes: "It is 
a sad yet pleasant duty to speak in tribute to the memory and the worth of 
Edwin D. Blanchard, my fellow townsman, my long-time friend, and my Sem- 
inary classmate. His way into the ministry was made in face of obstacles that 
would have disheartened one with less vigorous faith. He reached his majority 
with hardly more than a district school education. To carry out his resolve to 
secure a liberal training he was obliged to pay his own way, having almost no 
aid save that afforded by the usual scholarship helps for those studying for the 
ministry. By dint of economy and hard toil he finished his preparation with a 
larger library than most graduates, free from debt, and with sufficient money be- 
sides to pay the expense of his long final sickness and distant burial. In his 
manful effort to equip himself for his anticipated work he clearly showed that 



233 

the average young man of true Christian character can gain a thorough profes- 
sional training if he will use the necessary self-denial and enterprise. The 
marked qualities of Mr. Blanchard's character were his modesty, gentleness, 
and unflinching fidelity. He was uniformly cheerful, and never censorious nor 
unforgiving. He had learned the art of true living. He did his work cheerfully 
and well. He bore his sufferings with patience and Christian hope. His was a 
gracious spirit, ' fit for the Master's use.' " 

He died of stricture of the intestines, at Los Angeles, Cal., August 6, 1895, 
aged thirty-six years, three months, and twenty-two days. He was never married. 



NOT PREVIOUSLY REPORTED 



GLASS OF 1837. 
Daniel Bates Woods. 

Son of Rev. Leonard Woods, D.D. (professor in Andover Seminary thirty- 
eight years), and Abigail Wheeler; born in Andover, September 20, 1809; pre- 
pared for college in Phillips Academy, Andover ; studied three years in Am- 
herst College, and graduated at Union College, 1833; took the full course in 
this Seminary, 1834-37 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Prof. Ralph Emerson, D.D., Andover, April II, 1837. He was or- 
dained, September 19, 1839, and was pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Spring- 
water, N. Y., 1839-41; taught schools for young ladies in Virginia, first at 
Prince Edward Court House, then at Appomattox Church, preaching as a labor 
of love at those places, alternating also at Cumberland Church, 1841-44; his 
voice failing, he abandoned preaching, but continued teaching, in Philadelphia, 
1844-49, Cincinnati, 1852-55, and for a few years at St. Louis. His home re- 
mained in the latter city, and he had been an invalid for several years before his 
death. 

Mr. Woods was the last survivor but one of the ten children of Dr. Leonard 
Woods. He published on his return from a sojourn in California, 1849-51, 
Sixteen Months in the Gold Diggings. A notice in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch 
says : " He came to St. Louis in 1855 and established a large seminary at 
Eighth and Olive Streets, where the daughters of many prominent people of the 
city, State, and various portions of the South were educated. The sincere 
piety and humble sincerity of Mr. Woods's character endeared him to all with 
whom he came in contact, and many a matron of today who received her edu- 
cational instruction at his hands will learn with deep regret of the death of her 
old tutor." 

Mr. Woods was married, January 1, 1839, to Hannah Elizabeth Pierce, of 
Boston, daughter of Parker H. Pierce (captain of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery) and Hannah Withington. She survives him, with two sons, who are 
in business at St. Louis, and three daughters; one son and one daughter are 
deceased. 

Mr. Woods died of angina pectoris, at St. Louis, Mo., May 30, 1892, aged 
eighty- two years, eight months, and ten days. 



234 
GLASS OF 1841. 

Henry Kingsley. 

Son of Chester Kingsley and Rhoda Weeks ; born in Canajohairie, N. Y., 
November 3, 1809; prepared for college at Burr Seminary, Manchester, Vt. ; 
graduated at Middlebury College, 1838 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1838-41 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. 
Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 1841. He was not ordained, but 
preached at Sudbury, Vt., 1841-42, did home missionary work in Indiana in 
1844, and preached at Clarendon, Vt., in 1845. In 1846 he settled in Brandon, 
Vt., and was in the book business there until 1856; then removed to Middle- 
bury, Vt., and practiced dentistry until 1876, afterwards living on a farm. 

Rev. Albert W. Dickens, pastor of the Congregational Church at Middle- 
bury, of which Mr. Kingsley was a member, writes: "Although I saw little of 
him, I was deeply impressed by his exceeding cheerfulness of spirit. He was 
almost totally blind when I knew him, scarcely able to detect a glimmer of 
light, and yet bright and happy, far beyond most men of his age. This natural 
disposition of course affected his ideas of religion, which were decidedly hope- 
ful and inspiring. " 

Mr. Kingsley was twice married, first, December 15, 1841, to Anna C. 
Janes, and second, February 12, 1866, to Mary Hull Gibb; he had four sons 
and six daughters ; two sons and two daughters are deceased. 

Mr. Kingsley died of old age and general debility, at Middlebury, Vt., 
March 28, 1894, aged eighty-four years, four months, and twenty-five days. 



235 

The list of departed Alumni for 1895-96 largely exceeds in number any 
other presented since the publication of the Necrology, only two of the fifty- 
six names belonging to the record of previous years. The average age of the 
fifty-six is seventy-four years and four days. Three of the number were over 
ninety, twenty were between eighty and ninety, fourteen between seventy and 
eighty, and twelve between sixty and seventy; two only were below fifty. 

Thirty-one were full graduates, twenty took only a part of their course at 
this Seminary, and five studied here as resident licentiates. Every one of the 
fifty-six was a college graduate before beginning theological study. Amherst 
and Yale each sent thirteen, Harvard six, Dartmouth five, Bowdoin, Middle - 
bury, and Williams four each, Vermont and Union two each, Brown, New Jer- 
sey, and Illinois one each. 

The roll of the deceased is remarkable, not only for number and longevity, 
and the thorough education of every man, but for their high standing and 
devoted — in some cases illustrious — service in varied fields of usefulness. 
Dr. Edward Beecher, Dr. Kitchel, Dr. Magoun, and Dr. DeForest were college 
presidents ; Professor Talcott a lifelong instructor in Bangor Seminary ; Dr. 
Clark and Dr. Alden gave eminent service as corresponding secretaries of the 
American Board ; Park was an enthusiastic missionary in India ; Turner and 
Storrs were pioneer home missionaries and superintendents ; many others, like 
Russell, Coggin, Beach, Whittlesey, Safford, Hubbell, were faithful, successful 
pastors — Harding in one pastorate for over forty years, and Blodgett for a full 
half century. Johnson was a distinguished physician, and White an honored 
business man. 

Professor Park, of 1831, at the age of eighty- seven, now heads the long roll 
of living Alumni; and Dr. Riggs, of 1832, eighty- five years old, is spared to send 
from Constantinople a touching tribute to the last survivor of his class, save 
himself, Dr. Samuel F. Smith, the author of our national hymn, America. 



The following men are still living of classes previous to and including the 
class of 1836 — sixty years ago : 

Age. 

1831. Rev. Prof. Edwards A. Park, D.D., LL.D., Andover, Mass. 87 

1832. Rev. Elias Riggs, D.D., LL.D., Constantinople, Turkey . . 85 

1833. Rev - George W. Kelley, Haverhill, Mass 87 

1834. Rev. John J. Dana, Housatonic, Mass 84 

Mr. Joseph L. Partridge, Brooklyn, N. Y 9 2 

Prof. Samuel Porter, Washington, D. C 86 

Rev. George T. Todd, Fond du Lac, Wis 85 

1835. Rev. Bela Fancher, Homer, Mich 8 9 

Rev. Joseph W. Cross, West Boylston, Mass 88 

1836. Rev. Prof. Joseph Packard, D.D., Theological Seminary, Va. 83 
Rev. Prof. William S. Tyler, D.D., LL.D., Amherst, Mass. . 86 



The alumni association. 

By unanimous vote of the Alumni present at the annual meeting in 
June, 1895, the Association was reorganized "on a more definite basis, 
so as to command, to a greater degree, the interest and cooperation of 
the Alumni generally." The Constitution then adopted included the 
following provisions : 

All graduates and past members of the Seminary, all present and 
past officers of the Seminary, including the Trustees and the Board of 
Visitors, may become members of the Association. 

It is made the duty of the Secretary to present at each annual 
meeting a list of all past students of the Seminary who have died dur- 
ing the preceding year, and, when the funds at the disposal of the As- 
sociation will allow, to see that a biographical record similar to those 
already published be printed and distributed to the members. The 
annual catalogue of the Seminary, th,e printed Necrology, the program 
of Anniversary Week, and the next General Catalogue will also be sent 
to members of the Association. 

The annual fee of membership is one dollar, and all Alumni who 
have not joined the Association are urged to send that amount for 
the current year, 1896-97, with their addresses, to the treasurer, Rev. 
W. L. Ropes, Andover, Mass. 

Alumni are specially requested to send to the Secretary, at An- 
dover, notice of the death of any past member of the Seminary, as well 
as change of address or other information concerning the record of 
living Alumni. 



OFFICERS. 

Rev. Thomas L. Gulick, Class of 1868, Moderator, 1895. 

Rev. Prof. W. H. Ryder, Class of 1869, ^ 

Rev. Harry P. Dewey, Class of 1887, I Executwe 

Rev. Frederick H. Page, Class of 1893, [ Commtttee > 

Rev. George H. Gutterson, Class of 1878, ) lS 95~9 6 - 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Class of 1875, Andover, Secretary, 1895-98. 

Rev. W. L. Ropes, Class of 1852, Andover, Treasurer, 1893-98. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1896-97. 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 9, 1897, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. 7. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, i Somerset Street, 

1897. 



INDEX. 

Class. Age. Page. 

1880. Frank S. Adams 41 271 

1843. Harvey Adams 87 248 

1853. George E. Allen 66 261 

1866. William H. Beard 60 268 

1852. Joshua J. Blaisdell 69 255 

1878. Charles C. Bruce 42 270 

1837. Henry T. Cheever 83 240 

1841. Theodore J. Clark 81 243 

1848. Oliver Crane 74 252 

1855. Ebenezer Douglass 69 263 

1894. Egbert S. Ellis 30 274 

1858. John D. Emerson 68 265 

1841. Luther Farnham 81 244 

1841. Mark Gould 84 245 

1851. William B. Greene 71 253 

1869. Charles E. Harwood 54 269 

1848. William T. Herrick 78 253 

1841. Charles Kellogg 80 246 

1858. William A. McGinley 65 266 

1845. Dwight W. Marsh 72 250 

i860. Charles E. Milliken 66 267 

1886. Henry B. Miter 44 273 

1854. Ira F. Pettibone 73 262 

1852. Alonzo H. Quint 68 258 

1843. Alden B. Robbins 79 249 

1838. Leander Thompson 84 241 

1834. George T. Todd 86 239 

1841. William Walker 88 246 

1851. Henry Wickes 76 254 

1856. Lyman R. Williston 66 264 



ITEOROLOGY. 



ALUMNI. 

GLASS OF 1834. 

George Thompson Todd. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Eli Todd and Rachel Thompson; born in New Milford, Conn., 
September 6, 1810; fitted for college under private tuition; graduated at Yale 
College, 1829; law student in Yale College, 1830-31 ; studied in this Seminary 
1831-32, and in Princeton Seminary, 1832-35; licensed to preach by the Litch 
field (Conn.) South Association in April, 1835. He was ordained by the Pres 
bytery of Bedford as pastor of the Gilead Presbyterian Church at Carmel,N. Y. 
October 11, 1838, having already been its acting pastor from 1835, and remain 
ing there until 1844 ; was acting pastor of Congregational church in Bethel 
Conn., 1844 ; pastor of Presbyterian churches in Ballston Spa, N. Y., 1845-47 
and Smithfield, N. Y., 1847-55; without charge at Smithfield, 1855-56, at Fond 
du Lac, Wis., 1856-90, at Minneapolis, Minn., 1890-92, at Fond du Lac, 1892-94, 
and at Aberdeen, S. D., from 1894. 

Mr. Todd was honorably retired from the Presbyterian ministry, having 
been nearly blind for many years. His son, Rev. Calvin C. Todd, Presbyterian 
pastor in Aberdeen, S. D., writes of his father: "The best tribute I can fur- 
nish concerning him is to say that he was a finished earthly specimen of God's 
gracious workmanship. He knew his Lord, and had attained a rare acquaint- 
ance with his Lord's word. Salvation by the atoning blood of the Lamb was 
the theme on which he dwelt the most. The last earthly smile that lighted up 
his saintly features was on the day of his death, when I asked him if I should 
read to him from the Bible." The following has also been received from Prof. 
Samuel Porter, of Kendall Green, Washington, D. C, his classmate at Yale 
and at Andover, and a few months his senior in age : " From what I knew of 
him as a classmate, I held him in high esteem as a sincere, honest, and good- 
hearted man, modest and unpretentious, and one who would be likely to be 
faithful in duty as a Christian minister." 

Mr. Todd was married, June 27, 1844, to Mary Ann Winchell, of North 
East, N. Y., daughter of Rev. James Manning Winchell (pastor of the First 
Baptist Church, Boston, who died in 1820) and Tamma Thompson. She died 
December 29, 1850, and he married, April 12, 1854, Coralie Chamberlin, daugh- 
ter of Calvin Chamberlin and Charlotte Finch. She survives him with three 
sons and two daughters, one daughter having deceased. 

Mr. Todd died of old age, at Aberdeen, S. D., February 10, 1897, aged 
eighty-six years, five months, and four days. 



240 
GLASS OF 1837. 

Henry Theodore Cheever, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Nathaniel Cheever and Charlotte Barrel!; born in Hallowell, Me., 
February 6, 1814; prepared for college at Hallowell Academy and Phillips 
Academy, Andover ; graduated at Bowdoin College, 1834; studied in this Sem- 
inary, 1834-35; correspondent of the New York Evangelist from the Mediter- 
ranean and Louisiana, 1835-36; teacher in Palquemine and New Orleans, La., 
1836-37 ; completed his theological study at Bangor Seminary, 1837-39 ; re- 
mained there as resident graduate, and supplied the church at Oldtown, Me., 
1S39-40; his health failing in connection with his excessive labors during a 
season of revival at Oldtown, he traveled in the Sandwich Islands and South 
America, 1840-43, acting as correspondent of the A T ew York Evangelist. He 
was ordained at Lodi, N. J., June 4, 1847, and was pastor there, 1847-48; of 
the Free Congregational Church, on Chrystie Street, New York City, 1848-49; 
,mt editor of the New York Evangelist, 1850-52; pastor at Greenport, 
L. I., 1852-55; at Westbrook, Conn., 1855-56; at Jewett City, Conn., 1856-61; 
at South Rovalston, Mass., 1862-63 ; of Trinitarian Church, Fitchburg, Mass., 
1863-64; of Mission Chapel Church, Worcester, Mass., 1864-73; resided after- 
wards in Worcester, without charge. 

Mr. Cheever received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Bowdoin 
College in 1892. Like his brother, Rev. Dr. George B. Cheever (Class of 1830), 
he was an early and persistent advocate of unpopular reforms; remained so 
during his life and left considerable bequests for their support. Besides his 
voluminous writing as a newspaper correspondent, he published a large num- 
ber of books, the following list giving only a part of them : The Whale ana His 
Captors ; The Island World of the Pacific ; Memorials of Nathaniel Cheever, M.D.; 
Short Yarns for Long Voyages ; The Sea and the Sailor, from the Literary Re- 
mains of Walter Colto?i, and Life and Writings of Rev. Walter Colton, U.S.N. 
(Class of 1825); Autobiography and Memorials of Ichabod Washburn ; Corre- 
spondencies of Faith and Views of Madame Guy on ; Tracts for the Times; Mem- 
orabilia of Dr. George B. Cheever and of His Wife, Elizabeth Wetmore ; Biblical 
Eschatology. 

Rev. Daniel Merriman, D.D. (Class of 1868), pastor of the Central Church, 
Worcester, with which Dr. Cheever was connected, writes: "Dr. Cheever was 
a man of great force of character and very strong convictions. He was abso- 
lutely fearless, and so earnest in his views on matters of reform, such as tem- 
perance, that he was apt to overlook considerations of practical wisdom, and 
sometimes to be unduly vehement in his expressions. He was impatient with 
expediency, and not unfrequently took positions that were untenable, and used 
almost violent language in the endeavor to carry out cherished plans. This 
caused him often to be misunderstood and sometimes maligned by those who 
did not know him and could not appreciate the purity of motive and tremen- 
dous moral earnestness of the man. But under all this stress of word and atti- 
tude there was a big, loving heart, tenderly sympathetic with all suffering, inca- 
pable of resentment, full of generous humanity, singularly reverent and open to 
divine fellowship, loyal, direct, affectionate. Dr. Cheever had a fine literary 
gift. He was an eager student, broad and mystical in his theology, and strik- 
ingly devout in his spirit. His missionary and philanthropic ardor was intense, 



241 

and his faith in the Redeemer and the Redeemer's kingdom unfaltering. In 
all his life there was the note of battle, but it was always, and especially in the 
later years, mingled and absorbed in the sweet tones of charity and hope." 

The following is quoted from an article in the Christian Mirror by his 
Bowdoin classmate, Rev. Cyrus Hamlin, D.D., LL.D., of Lexington, Mass. : 
"As we often differed in our views, I had the better opportunity to understand 
him thoroughly. There was never a nature more full of the attribute of hon- 
esty than his. He believed honestly, he acted honestly, and he often wondered 
that others could think and act differently, and especially that I, his old friend, 
should so far differ from him. But this brought to view one of his golden ex- 
cellences. He never showed the least sign of personal resentment toward 
those who opposed him, even if they treated him abusively. He was unsparing 
in his denunciation of wrong, but always had a heart of kindness toward the 
wrongdoer, so as to admit of every possible apology for him, while he might 
denounce the measure or the principle in the strongest manner the English 
language would enable him to do. I cherish great affection for him on account 
of this perfect moral balance. He always had, what has nearly perished out of 
our times, a burning indignation at oppression, injustice, and cruelty wherever 
exercised. Distance had little to do with it. He would have public sentiment 
smite it, however distant, however strongly intrenched. . . . Neither fear nor 
favor ever caused him to swerve, by one hair's breadth, from the straight line 
of right. If there were sometimes asperities in his denunciation of evil, age 
softened them. He was a man of faith, and if I pass over Jordan to the prom- 
ised land I shall meet him there." 

Dr. Cheever was married, April 27, 1857, to Jane Tyler, of Jewett City, 
Conn., daughter of Lucius Tyler, M.D., and Olive Johnson, who died July 9, 1885. 
Of five daughters, four survive ; one is the wife of President William J. Tucker, 
of the Class of 1866. 

Dr. Cheever died of old age, at Worcester, Mass., February 13, 1897, aged 
eighty-three years and seven days. 



CLASS OP 1838. 

Leander Thompson. 

Son of Dea. Charles Thompson and Mary Wyman; born in Woburn, 
March 7, 181 2 ; prepared for college at Warren Academy, Woburn ; graduated 
at Amherst College, 1835; took the full course at this Seminary, 1835-38; 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Dr. Justin 
Edwards, Andover, April 10, 1838. He was ordained at Woburn, Novem- 
ber 30, 1838; was acting pastor at Granby, Mass., 1838-39; under appointment 
of the American Board as missionary to Syria, he sailed from Boston, Janu- 
ary 24, 1840, and reached Beirut the following April; besides preaching and 
other missionary work, taught in the high school at Beirut during the larger 
part of three years; returned to this country in 1843. He was P astor at South 
Hadley Falls, Mass., 1843-50; without charge at Woburn, 1850-54; pastor at 
West Amesbury (now Merrimac), Mass., 1854-67; at Wolfeboro, N. H., 1S6S- 
69, and at North Woburn, Mass., 1869-73; resided at North Woburn, without 
charge, afterward. 



242 

Mr. Thompson's missionary experience, although short, was one of danger 
and trouble, and left its impress upon his health for the rest of his life. It was 
a time of war and rumors of war in that land, and he was obliged, with other 
missionaries, to seek refuge in Jerusalem; both there and afterwards at Beirut 
he suffered protracted and severe attacks of malarial fever, which at length 
necessitated his leaving the field. After retiring finally from the active min- 
istry, and settling in his native village, he devoted himself to literary pursuits, 
especially in connection with local and family history. He published the 
Centennial History of the Woburn Schools ; History of the Churches of Woburn 
(in History of Middlesex County) ; Meviorial of James Thompson and of Eight 
Generations of His Descendants, the last being a genealogical work of special 
interest and value. He published also Fast Day sermons in 1845 an d ^56, 
Memorial of Rev. Benjamin F. Hosford of Haverhill, 1866, Remarks at the 
Funeral of Dea. Stephen Richardson, Woburn, 1872, and other occasional dis- 
courses, besides numerous contributions to the local press. He was a member 
of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and a founder and trustee 
of the Rumford Historical Association, Woburn. 

Rev. Charles S. Sherman, of Manchester Green, Ct., Mr. Thompson's 
Seminary classmate, who was ordained with him at Woburn, and who was a 
fellow laborer in Syria, writes of him: " Regarding my very dear friend, Lean- 
der Thompson, I have uniformly regarded him as a man of well-balanced mind, 
strong in his convictions, of tender sensibility, of great firmness of purpose, 
and a truly practical preacher. He was a loving and lovable man.'' 1 Rev. Dr. 
Cyrus Hamlin, of Lexington, Mass., for so many years identified with Turkish 
missions, writes : " I knew Leander Thompson before either of us entered the 
mission fields to which we were looking, I to Constantinople, he to Beirut. 
From our first interview we became friends, and ever remained so. He was a 
very earnest, consecrated missionary, but he was tried by war and pestilence, 
and finally left the field with a shattered constitution. His letters express the 
deepest affliction at his forced departure from the fields, but great joy that 
I had health enough to continue my work. 'I am separated forever,' he said, 
' from the work I loved and longed for, but when oppressed I turn my thoughts 
to you, still bearing the heat and burden of the day.' He had the liveliest in- 
terest in the missionary cause to the last, and the deepest sympathy with it, 
until he was called to join the host of laborers and converts who have gone up 
from those Oriental fields." 

Mr. Thompson was married, November 6, 1839, to Anne Eliza Avery, of 
Wolfeboro, N. H., daughter of Samuel Avery and Mary Moody Clark. She 
survives him, with one son. Two daughters and two sons died in infancy or 
childhood (their first child, born in Jerusalem, dying in Beirut). Everett A. 
Thompson, Amherst College, 187 1, a successful teacher, died, much lamented, 
in 1890. 

Mr. Thompson died of paralysis, at North Woburn, Mass. (in the house 
in which he was born), October 18, 1896, aged eighty-four years, seven months, 
and eleven days. 



243 
CLASS OF 1841. 

Theodore Jarvis Clark. 

Son of Dea. Enos Clark and Susan Allen ; born in Northampton, Mass., 
February 14, 1815 ; prepared for college at Henry Dwight's Select School and 
the Round Hill School, Northampton, and at Sheldon Academy, Southampton ; 
graduated at Williams College, 1836; taught in the preparatory department of 
Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, 1836-37 ; studied at the Theological Institute 
of Connecticut, East Windsor, 1837-38, and in this Seminary, 1838-39; taught 
in the High School, Northampton, 1839-40; returned to Andover for senior 
year, 1840-41 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 1841. After supplying the church in 
Cummington, Mass., nearly one year, he was ordained as its pastor, October 11, 
1842, and dismissed May 26, 1852, but still continued in its service until 1859. 
He was acting pastor at Bernardston, Mass., 1859-61, and pastor at Ashfield, 
Mass., 1862-65, having already supplied the church there from the fall of 1861. 
He was acting pastor of the church in Northfield, Mass., 1865-70, installed 
pastor there, August 17, 1870, and continued such for ten years. He resided a 
Northfield, without charge, 1880-81, and at Manchester, Vt, 1881-85, although 
supplying the church at Peru for two years, 1882-84. He was then acting pas- 
tor over his former charge at Bernardston, Mass., 1885-88; resided, without 
charge, at Northfield, 1888-94, at Brattleboro, Vt., 1894-96, removing to the 
home of his daughter at Springfield, Mass., a few months before his death. 

Nearly all of Mr. Clark's contemporaries have passed on, but the compiler 
of these sketches, in whose native town he was for some years an acceptable 
and beloved pastor, can speak most heartily of his ability as a preacher, his 
fidelity as a shepherd of the flock, and, above all, of his sincere, genuine, beau- 
tiful Christian character. Rev. Lyman Whiting, D.D. (Class of 1842), whose 
eightieth birthday has just been celebrated at East Charlemont, Mass., writes 
that "the one thing he remembers in Brother Clark's ministry is his skill in 
the use of Scripture in prayer. Few can ever do it as he did — a profuseness, 
almost an inspired selection, giving a divine tone and beauty to his devotions." 
In a personal letter, written two years before his death, Mr. Clark said: " I have 
just finished the reading of Dr. Cyrus Hamlin's Life and Times. He expresses 
my own feelings when he says in the review of his life, « The feeling, the judg- 
ment, that I might have done more and better follows me all through, what- 
ever mood I may be in. In this solemn review I repeat to myself with infinite 
satisfaction, 

There is a fountain filled with blood.'" 

Mr. Clark was married, October 5, 1842, to Julia Pierpont Hollister, of 
Manchester, Vt., daughter of Alvah Hollister and Mary Munson. She sur- 
vives him, with one daughter, two sons and one daughter having died in 
childhood. 

Mr. Clark died of heart failure, at Springfield, Mass., August 23, 1896, 
aged eighty-one years, six months, and nine days. 



244 

Luther Farnham. 

Son of Ephraim Farnham (descendant of Ralph Farnum, the emigrant, 
who settled in Andover) and Sarah Brown ; born in Concord, N. H., Febru- 
ary 5, 1S16; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H.; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1837; principal of Limerick (Me.) Academy 
for one year, and for a short time assistant teacher at Pembroke (N. H.) Acad- 
emy ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1838-41 ; licensed to preach by the 
Hopkinton Association, at Concord, N. H., August 9, 1842. He was ordained, 
November 20, 1844, as pastor of the church in Northfield, Mass., but in 1845 
resigned and moved to Boston, where he has since resided. For some years he 
supplied, for brief periods, churches in the vicinity of Boston : Marshfield, Con- 
cord, Tiverton, R. I., Lynnfield, First Church of West Newbury, East Marsh- 
field, Burlington, New Bedford, and other places. He was assistant editor of 
the Christian Alliance, 1845-47, was Boston correspondent of the New York 
Journal of Cotnmerce for twelve years previous to 1861, and was a frequent 
contributor to the Massachusetts Ploughman, Boston Post, Puritan Recorder, 
and New York Observer. He was a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and was its librarian, 1854-56. He was secretary of the 
Southern Aid Society, 1855-61. It is stated that he first suggested the estab- 
lishment in Boston of alumni associations of Dartmouth College and Kimball 
Union Academy. He was the early and chief promoter of the General Theo- 
logical Library in Boston, and was its secretary from 1862 until his death. His 
only publications were a Thanksgiving sermon before the First Battalion of 
Rifles, M. V. M., at West Newbury, 1852, and a Glance at Private Libraries, 
1855. 

Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, D.D., of Boston (Class of 1844), writes thus of 
the principal work of Mr. Farnham's life: "The death of the late Rev. Mr. 
Farnham will be a great loss to the General Theological Library. His life for 
many years was identified with its struggles and its success. Feeble in its 
beginning, slow in its growth, it has finally become an important and, indeed, 
a necessary institution. Mr. Farnham's hand may be seen in every stage of 
its progress. He was emphatically the father of the corporation. He had the 
sagacity to plan, the wisdom to organize, and the energy and zeal to carry for- 
ward the work in the presence of obstacles which, to most men, would have 
been insuperable. He saw far beyond the obstacles that lay in his path. He 
knew that they were temporary and would soon pass away, as the portentous 
clouds that gather on a summer's day. He seemed to see in the distant future 
a great library, rich in its manifold departments of learning, the ingathering of 
sacred literature of all time and in all languages, offering to the scholar the 
best thought and the achievements of the profoundest study in the whole circle 
of theological science. For this object Mr. Farnham labored on, year after year, 
dignified, courteous, self-poised, turning neither to the right hand nor to the 
left, removing the obstacles in his immediate presence, and always making a 
clear and well-defined progress in his undertaking. Thus he laid the founda- 
tion and reared the superstructure of our Theological Library as it exists today 
in Boston. When the ideal of a great library, as he saw it, shall be realized, 
as it doubtless will be, the credit and the honor of laying its foundation will be 
ustly given to the Rev. Luther Farnham." 



245 

Mr. Farnham was married, June 23, 1845, to Mrs. Eugenia Frink Alexan- 
der, daughter of Dea. Levi Fay (of Boston) and Lucretia Scott, and widow of 
Francis Alexander, of Northfield, Mass. She died May 22, 1892; one son, 
who died in 1854, at the age of eight years. 

Mr. Farnham died of heart failure, in Boston, March 15, 1897, aged eighty- 
one years, one month, and ten days. 



Mark Gould. 

Son of Capt. John Gould (a native of Tyngsborough, Mass.) and Alice 
Taylor Woods; born in Wilton, Me., December 2, 181 1; fitted for college at 
Farmington (Me.) Academy; graduated at Bowdoin College, 1837; preceptor 
of Alfred (Me.) Academy, 1837-38; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1838-41 ; licensed to preach by the Franklin Association, at Farmington, Me., 
March 24, 1841 ; his health having failed in his senior year, he went West, residing 
with his brother, Rev. David Gould, at Georgetown, Ohio; principal of Female 
Seminary there. 1842-43; teacher at Felicity, Ohio, 1844-45; principal of pre- 
paratory department in Central College, Ohio, 1846, also supplying the church 
in the town (Blendon); home missionary at Huntingdon, Ohio, 1847-48, and at 
Wadsworth, Ohio, 1848-49; taught in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 1850. Returning 
East in 1851, he was ordained at Andover, Me., October 8, 1851, and was pastor 
there until 1858; acting pastor in Standish, Me., 1858-62; without charge at 
Standish, 1862-63; acting pastor at West Minot and Monmouth, Me., 1863-64; 
at Chichester, N. H., 1864-72; at Nelson, N. H., 1872-77; without charge, 
Ashburnham, Mass., 1877-82, and at Worcester, Mass., 1882 until death. 

Mr. Gould served as superintendent of schools when in Chichester and 
Nelson, N. H. He published a funeral sermon on the death of Mrs. Jeremy 
N. C. Leavitt, of Chichester, 1872; Pictures of Zion or Symbols Unfolded, 1878; 
Poems for the Times on Temperafice and the Sabbath, 1891 ; The Mosead and Our 
Nation (in verse), 1894. Rev. Charles M. Southgate, of Auburndale (Class of 
1870), former pastor of Pilgrim Church, Worcester, of which Mr. Gould was a 
member, wrote of him in the Congregationalist : " His years were close upon 
fourscore and five, yet was not their strength labor and sorrow. His eye saw, 
his ear heard, thought and memory were clear up to the hour when, murmuring 
4 Home, home,' he went to his Father's house. Mr. Gould loved life, and 
strove to lead a full and helpful life. Great interests and great reforms, such 
as anti-slavery and temperance, he loyally supported." Rev. George H. Gould, 
D.D. (Class of 1853), said at his funeral : " He was a man of strong convictions, 
penetrating faith, and clear mind. He was a born Protestant, or, as I might 
put the accent on the second syllable, his impulse was to protest. He was 
ready to give a reason for the hope that was in him, and wanted others to do 
the same. His impulse was to challenge a man, and he planted himself squarely 
on the Word of God. His heart was full of affection for the whole revelation 
of God. He didn't want to die; he wanted to live. He was a man of prayer, 
and had a list of names from his various charges over whom he wrestled to win 
them to God many years." 

Mr. Gould was married, July 5, 1847, to Electa Maria Radley, of Jersey, 
Ohio, daughter of William Radley and Maria Carter. She died October 16, 
1850. He married, second, January 27, 1852, Abbie Abbott Carter, of Bethel, 



246 

Me., daughter of Dr. Timothy Carter and Lydia Russell (and descendant of 
Jonathan Abbot of Andover). She survives him, with one daughter, two other 
daughters having died in early womanhood. 

Mr. Gould died of chronic gastritis, at Worcester, Mass., August 7, 1896, 
aged eighty-four years, eight months, and five days. 



Charles Kellogg. 

Son of Timothy Kellogg and Betsy Mellen; born in Hudson, N. Y-, 
March 31, 1816; fitted for college under private tuition; graduated at the 
University of the City of New York, 1839; studied in Union Seminary, 1839-40, 
and graduated from this Seminary, 1841. He was licensed, April 13, 1841, by 
the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, and was 
ordained November 10, 1841. He was pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Richmond (now Memphis), Mich., 1841-46, and in Almont, Mich., 1846-56. 
Having materially changed his theological views, he then retired from the 
ministry and practiced law in a quiet way for several years, being judge of 
probate for Lapeer County for the years 1858 and 1859. He removed to 
Detroit in 1862, and resided there afterwards, engaged in private banking and 
other business enterprises. 

A notice of him in the Detroit Journal says: "He was president of the 
Michigan Navigation Company. He was scrupulously exact in his business 
dealings, and his strict notions of integrity never permitted any compromise 
between doing what he thought right and what might be deemed expedient." 
The following is quoted from the Plymouth Weekly of the same city: "Mr. 
Kellogg did not countenance some of the business methods adopted during 
the war, and he disposed of his interests [in private banking business]. Dur- 
ing the latter part of his life he was unconnected with any church, but his 
sympathies were understood to be largely with Unitarian views. He was a 
strictly honest man, and rather than occupy a pulpit with which his views had 
begun to disagree he demitted the ministry altogether — a step wholly to his 
credit." 

Mr. Kellogg was married, May 5, 1842, to Catharine Neafie, of Walden, 
N. Y., daughter of Peter Neafie and Margaret McEwen, who survives him, 
with one daughter. 

Mr. Kellogg died of paralysis, in Detroit, Mich., March 14, 1897, aged 
eighty years, eleven months, and thirteen days. 



William Walker. 

Son of Capt. Aaron Walker and Judith Sanborn ; born in Vershire, Vt., 
October 3, 1808; fitted for college at Potsdam (N. Y.) Academy; took the 
freshman year at Middlebury College, 1834-35, and graduated at Amherst 
College in 1838; took the- full course in this Seminary, 1838-41; licensed by 
the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, April 13, 
1841. He was ordained at Greensboro, Vt., November 4, 1841, and sailed the 
following month, under appointment of the American Board, to the Gaboon 
Mission in Western Africa, where he remained until 187 1, although visiting the 



247 

United States three times during that interval. From 1872 to 1877 he was in 
the service of the board in this country, visiting the churches in the interest of 
missions. In 1879, although at the age of seventy-one, he returned to Africa, 
at the call of the Presbyterian Board, to which the Gaboon Mission had been 
transferred, in order to complete his translation of the Bible into the native 
language. Returning to America in 1883, he resided afterwards in the home 
of his niece at Milton, Wis., often speaking for missions in that vicinity, and 
serving as pastor of the church in Milton, 1888-1891. 

Mr. Walker was a member of the American Oriental Society, and during 
his last residence in Africa served as United States Vice-commercial Agent at 
Gaboon. He declined to receive the degree of Doctor of Divinity, which the 
trustees of Beloit College voted to confer upon him. Rev. S. J. Humphrey, D.D , 
of Oak Park, 111. (Class of 1852), so long the western secretary of the American 
Board, writes of him in the Advance: "In addition to the ordinary work of 
teaching, preaching, and gathering converts, Mr. Walker reduced the Mpongwe 
tongue — a branch of the Bantu family of languages — to a written form, made 
a grammar of it, translated twenty-one books of the Bible into it, and also a 
small volume of hymns, thus leaving a lasting monument of his learning and 
patient industry. He was a quietly and unreservedly consecrated man. No 
nerve force was expended in a conflict between duty and desire. It was his 
meat and drink, with unquestioning obedience, to do his Father's will. Although 
apparently of a somewhat sluggish temperament, there was, beneath, a quiet 
enthusiasm which often flamed up into a burst of real eloquence in his public 
addresses. The fascination of his quaint way of putting things, irradiated, even 
in his soberest moments, with the gentle glow of a quiet humor, made him a 
favorite alike in public assemblies, social circles, and at the family fireside. In 
visiting the Dahomey village at the " White City" some of the natives, in dis- 
covering him, broke into the wildest expressions of delight. They had known 
him in Africa, and could scarcely contain themselves at seeing their old friend 
and at hearing again from the lips of a white man the words of their native 
tongue. Who shall say that there was not a more rapturous greeting a few 
days ago, when he entered the Golden City, from Africa's redeemed ones, dusky- 
hued, but with souls washed white in the blood of the Lamb 1 " 

Mr. Walker was married, November 30, 1841, to Prudence Richardson, of 
Dracut, Mass., daughter of Samuel Richardson and Prudence Wood. She died 
in Gaboon, May 2, 1842. He married, second, October 20, 1845, Zeviah Leavens 
Shumway, of Oxford, Mass., daughter of Peter Shumway and Sarah Spaulding. 
She also died in Africa, April 23, 1848. He married, third, September 30, 1851, 
Catharine Hardcastle, of New York City, daughter of John Hardcastle and 
Elizabeth Johnston. She died at Milton, Wis., October 27, 1877. His only 
child died in infancy. 

Mr. Walker died of bronchitis, at Milton, Wis., December 8, 1896, aged 
eighty-eight years, two months, and five days. 



248 
CLASS OF 1843. 

Harvey Adams. 

Son of Nathan Adams and Julia Almira Richardson ; born in Alstead, N. H., 
January 16, 1809; prepared for college under Jonathan C. Southmayd (Class 
of 1822) at the Washington County Grammar School, Montpelier, Vt., taking 
freshman studies with him while acting as his assistant in Burlington Academy, 
1835-36; entered the University of Vermont in 1836 and graduated in 1839; 
studied in this Seminary, 1839-40 and 1841-43, teaching a select school in Med- 
way, Mass., during the intervening year. He was licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, April II, 1843, 
and was ordained at Franklin, Mass., September 27, 1843, having been, with ten 
others of his class, known as the " Iowa Band," recognized as home mission- 
aries, at a special service in the South Church, Andover, on the Sunday evening 
before the Seminary commencement in September, when addresses were made 
by Dr. Leonard Bacon and Dr. Milton Badger. His whole life afterward was 
spent in pastoral service in Iowa: Farmington, 1843-60; Council Bluffs, 1860-63; 
Farmington (re-installed), 1863-66; New Hampton, 1866-71; Fairfax, 1871-74; 
Bowen's Prairie, 1875-83; resided, without charge, afterward with a married 
daughter at New Hampton. 

Mr. Adams received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1887 from Iowa 
College, of which he was a trustee from its foundation to the time of his death. 
He published Our Heritage, a Thanksgiving sermon ; Memorials of the Des 
Moines Valley, in the History of Iowa ; The Infidel Celebration, in the History 
of the Iowa Band. (It is said that Mr. Adams's off-hand defense of the Chris- 
tian religion on the occasion of this " Celebration " had much to do in ending 
the influence of Abner Kneeland and his fellow infidels in Iowa.) From a 
sketch written for the Congregational Iowa by Rev. Ephraim Adams, D.D., of 
Waterloo, Iowa, a classmate and lifelong fellow laborer in Iowa, the following 
is quoted: "He was distinguished rather for that symmetrical completeness 
which produces an even, steady flow of life force into other lives than for any 
one thing, startling or attractive. He was a man of prayer. It was in prayer 
that he sought direction as to questions of duty. Thus, in the night watches of 
a particular date in the Seminary, he decided that his field of labor should be 
at the West, independently of others, and before he knew that others were con- 
sidering the question. In intellect he was clear and logical ; in investigation, 
patient and thorough. He knew what he believed and why he believed. His 
preaching appealed to the reason and judgment rather than the emotions. He 
sought to instruct. To know God's word and declare it was his great aim. In 
his later years the Bible was his companion, his joy, his hope, and stay. He 
read it almost constantly, often in course, not dreamily and carelessly, for his 
mental vigor was in force almost to the very end. At the time when struck 
with paralysis, a few days before his death, the stroke came upon him with the 
Bible in his hands. ... So when death came and we buried him, it did not 
seem like death. It was rather the setting of a sun in glory for a more glorious 
rising, or, to change to a more Scriptural image, like a shock of corn fully ripe 
being garnered in." 

Mr. Adams was married, August 14, 1844, to Rhoda Matilda Codding, of 
North Wrentham, now Norfolk, Mass., daughter of Josiah Codding and Lois 



249 

Ware, who died June 23, 1893. H « had one son, a printer in Des Moines, and 
six daughters, two of whom survive. 

Mr. Adams died of old age, at New Hampton, Iowa, September 23, 1896, 
aged eighty-seven years, eight months, and seven days. 



Alden Burrill Robbins, D.D. 

Son of David Robbins and Elizabeth Burrill ; born in Salem, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 18, 1817; prepared for college under " Master Oliver," at Salem, having 
attended also Putnam and Eames's Classical School, Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
Goshen (Ct.) Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1839; studied in this 
Seminary, 1840-41, at Yale Divinity School, 1841-42, returning to Andover for 
the senior year, 1842-43 ; licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. S. C. Jackson, Andover, April 11, 1843. He was ordained as an 
evangelist (to labor in the Iowa Territory), at the Tabernacle Church, Salem, 
Mass., September 20, 1843, Rev - (afterwards President) William A. Stearns 
(Class of 1831) preaching the sermon, and Rev. Samuel M. Worcester (Class of 
1825) giving the charge. In October the " Iowa Band," already referred to in 
the sketch of Harvey Adams above, made their slow journey to that territory, 
by cars to Buffalo, by the lakes to Chicago, and on prairie wagons to the 
Mississippi. Mr. Robbins promptly began pastoral service at Muscatine (then 
Bloomington), November 1, 1843, and, although not formally installed until 
nine years later, was pastor there until November 9, 1891, a period of forty- 
eight years, and pastor emeritus from that time until his death. 

Through all these years he was prominently and most usefully connected 
with every good cause in his city, in his State, and in the Northwest. He was 
a trustee of Iowa College from its foundation in 1847, an d for many years the 
president of the Board, and a director in Chicago Theological Seminary from 
1855 to 1891. He was a member of the National Council at Boston in 1865, 
and a corporate member of the American Board from 1867. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst College in 1869. He took an active 
part in the great reforms of the time, and in support of the government during 
the War of the Rebellion. Of his funeral it is said : "It was an affecting sight 
to see the veterans of the Civil War in a large body and the whole city joining 
in testimonies of respect and honor." 

Rev. Dr. William Salter, of Burlington, Iowa, a Seminary classmate, sends 
the following tribute : "As to my dear Robbins, we were friends from the time 
we first met in Union Seminary in 1841, and our lives have been side by side 
for fifty-five years. We have shared each other's studies, services, sorrows, 
joys, and hospitalities of home, and for a long term had an annual exchange of 
pulpits, though sixty miles apart and, until comparatively recent years, without 
direct railroad communication with each other. In his devotion to the work 
of the ministry, in his opposition to slavery and the liquor traffic, in his zeal for 
education, for Iowa College, for the Chicago Theological Seminary, for the 
American Board and the kindred societies, and in a thousand courtesies and 
charities, he offered up the daily sacrifice. With Dr. E. Adams and wife he 
was here in my study on the 14th of April, 1896, and, as had been a habit with 
members of the ' Band ' at occasional meetings since 1863, when several of 
them were together in one place, he wrote a few sentences, to which all four 



250 

of us subscribed our names. This is what he wrote : ' At this meeting of three 
of the four survivors of the Iowa Band of 1843 st ^ residing in the State, we 
desire to express our sense of the wonderful goodness of God in giving us our 
home in this goodly State, in sustaining us through the many vicissitudes of 
our fifty-three years of life here ; and we make special record of our thanks to 
God for the sweet and cheering remembrance of the dear wives that have been 
so loving, patient, sustaining, inspiring helpers all the way, and that one, the 
wife of Rev. E. Adams, is still spared to meet with us, and of the assured sym- 
pathy with us of other wives of the Band, who, " left of their husbands," still 
live at different places in our beloved land.' In May, 1861, Dr. Robbins went 
over to Chicago to aid in procuring uniforms for a company of soldiers recruited 
in Muscatine, and was successful in the mission ; and that company, belonging 
to the First Iowa Infantry, fought bravely at Wilson's Creek under General 
Lyon after their term of enlistment had expired. 

" All his life in Iowa, Dr. Robbins's home was upon a high point on the 
bluff, from which he looked far away upon wide reaches of the Mississippi 
River. The view never lost its fascination to his mind. The vision was a 
symbol of the breadth of his outlook for that which never was on land or sea. 
He lived as seeing Him who is invisible." 

Dr. Robbins was married, September 27, 1843, to Eliza Catherine Hough, 
of Canterbury, Ct., daughter of Capt. Samuel L. Hough and Elizabeth Adams. 
She died July 16, 1850. He married, second, September 20, 1851, Mary Sewall 
Arnold, of Bath, Me., daughter of Ebenezer Arnold and Mary Jane Hill. 
She died June 22, 1894. Of three sons and six daughters, two sons and two 
daughters survive. One son is the secretary of Iowa College; one daughter is 
the widow of Pres. Henry S. DeForest (Class of 187 1), a sketch of whom was 
published in last year's Necrology, and another, the wife of Rev. George E. 
White, of the Western Turkey Mission at Marsovan. 

Dr. Robbins died of heart disease, at Muscatine, December 27, 1896, aged 
seventy-nine years, ten months, and nine days. 



GLASS OF 1845. 

D wight Whitney Marsh, D.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Henry Marsh, Esq., and Sarah Whitney; born in Dalton, Mass., 
November 5, 1823 ; prepared for college at Lenox (Mass.) Academy and Hop- 
kins Academy, Hadley, Mass.; graduated at Williams College, 1842; studied 
in this Seminary, 1842-43; taught in Dr. Edward Wyman's School for Boys in 
St. Louis, Mo., 1843-47 ; graduated at Union Seminary, 1849. He was ordained 
at Dalton, Mass., October 2, 1849, a s foreign missionary, Dr. John Todd (Class of 
1825) preaching the sermon, and went under the auspices of the American Board 
to Mosul, Turkey, where he remained until i860. He was in the service of the 
Board in this country, 1860-61 ; acting pastor at Hinsdale, Mass., 1861-62 ; 
principal of the Rochester (N. Y.) Seminary for Young Ladies, 1862-69, except 
one year, 1867-68, when he was pastor at Godfrey, 111.; acting pastor at Whit- 
ney's Point, N.Y., 1869-71; at Owego, N.Y., 1871-76; at North Amherst, 
Mass., 1876-78; at Haydenville, Mass., 1878-82; afterwards, without charge, 
at Amherst. 



251 

He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Williams Col- 
lege in 1875. He was a member of the American Oriental Society. His pub- 
lications were The Tennesseean in Persia, a life of Rev. Samuel A.' Rhea, 1869; 
sermon on the Assyrian Mission, 1856; half-century sermon, North Amherst', 
1876 ; Genealogy of Descendants of John Marsh of Salem, 1888 ; Descendants of 
John Marsh of Hartford, 1S95. While in Rochester he was for a time chaplain 
of the Western House of Refuge, and later for four years (1872-76) the statis- 
tical and publishing secretary of the General Association of New York. At 
Amherst he had for several years the charge of Zion Mission Church connected 
with the college. The first sculptures that came to this country from ancient 
Nineveh were sent to W r illiams College by Mr. Marsh, who obtained them from 
Layard. 

Rev. George W. Porter, D.D., of Lexington, Mass., writes : " Meeting first 
as strangers in the junior class of Andover Seminary in 1843, we were mutually 
drawn to each other. Our acquaintance soon changed to a lifelong friendship, 
and my heart cheerfully responds to the request to send a brief tribute to his 
memory. Dr. Marsh's natural character, temperament, and tastes were of a 
superior order. In his personality there was nothing eccentric or abrupt. His 
mental and moral attributes were well balanced. He was by nature devoid of 
prejudice, selfishness, and duplicity. His natural temper was gentle, forbear- 
ing, and loving. His tastes were all refined and elevated. He was an enthu- 
siastic lover of the works of nature. Ornithology was a favorite study. He 
was fond of music and was a good singer. He possessed a poetic tempera- 
ment and sometimes expressed himself in admirable verse. But while the 
gentler and more winsome traits predominated in Dr. Marsh, there was no 
lack of moral or mental strength and force. His convictions on ethical and 
practical subjects were decided and he never shrank from defending them when 
occasion required. He was strong without anger, decided without dogmatism, 
firm without obstinacy, and earnest without fanaticism. Under the renewing 
and quickening spirit of God his religious character was beautiful, strong, and 
fruitful. His daily life was a vivid illustration of his faith in Jesus Christ. In 
all the vicissitudes of a long and eventful life, involving much of trial and suf- 
fering, the image of the Divine Master was manifested in him in ever stronger 
and more definite lines." 

From a letter of Rev. Jay Clizbe, of Mason, Mich. (Class of 1864), to a 
memorial of Dr. Marsh, recently printed, the following extract is made : " My 
estimate of him, after close acquaintance for several years, is that he was one 
of the truest, most pure-minded, and most thoroughly honest men whom it was 
ever my privilege to know. He was an Israelite without guile. His sincerity 
was one of his most prominent traits. There seemed to be absolutely no sham 
or make-believe about him. He simply could.not profess a sentiment which he 
did not feel. In the State of New York, where he labored for some years, he 
was known in the association as our St. John. Every one who knew him loved 
him, and the better they knew him the more they recognized both the sweet- 
ness and the strength of his character." 

Dr. Marsh was married, October 19, 1852, to Julia White Peck, of New 
York City, daughter of Elisha Peck and Mary Jane Averill. She died at Mosul, 
August 12, 1859. He married, second, August 21, 1862, Elizabeth Le Baron 
Clarke, daughter of Rev. Eber Liscom Clarke and Sarah Lawrence, she being 



252 

at the time of her marriage a teacher in the Rochester Seminary for Young 
Ladies. Of three sons and two daughters, all died in infancy or childhood 
except Rev. William Dwight Marsh, Amherst College, 1888, now preaching at 
Schroon Lake, N.Y. 

Dr. Marsh died of enlargement of the liver, at Amherst, Mass., June 18, 
1896, aged seventy-two years, seven months, and thirteen days. 



GLASS OF 1848. 

Oliver Crane, D.D., LL.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Stephen Fordham Crane and Matilda Howell Smith ; born in West 
Bloomfield, now Montclair, N. J., July 12, 1822; prepared for college at Bloom- 
field Academy; entered the sophomore class of Yale College and graduated in 
1845; taught in John F. Girard's boarding school, Bordentown, N. J., 1845-46; 
took the middle year in this Seminary, 1846-47, and graduated at Union Semi- 
nary, 1848 ; licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Newark in April, 1848, and 
ordained by same Presbytery as foreign missionary, June 29, 1848. Going to 
Turkey under commission of the American Board early in 1849, ne spent one 
year in Broosa, and was afterwards in Aintab (where he was instructor in the- 
ology), Aleppo, and Marsovan, until in 1853 his wife's illness compelled a re- 
turn to America. He was pastor of Presbyterian churches in Huron, N. Y., 
1854-57, and Waverly, N. Y., 1857-60. He was reappointed to service in Tur- 
key, and was stationed at Adrianople, 1860-63. He was then pastor of Presby- 
terian church in Carbondale, Pa., 1864-70; without charge at Montclair, N. J., 
1870-71; at Morristown, N. J., 1871-91, but in that period spending several 
months (in 1874) in missionary service at Aintab, preaching for a long time 
in a schoolhouse at Morris Plains, and as a stated supply at Stirling. From 
1891 he resided in Boston. 

He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Eclectic 
Medical College, New York City, in 1867, having attended lectures before en- 
tering the missionary service. The University of Wooster in Ohio conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1880, and Westminster College 
in Missouri that of Doctor of Laws in 1889. The latter degree was given in 
recognition of the scholarship evinced in the Translation into English Dactylic 
Hexameter of Virgil's sEneid, a work favorably reviewed in the Andover Review 
of July, 1888, by Principal C. F. P. Bancroft (Class of 1867). He also pub- 
lished Minto and Other Poems, The Torn Testament (a tract), and various 
occasional sermons and addresses. As secretary of his college class he pub- 
lished a remarkably full Class Record in 1881. He was a corporate member of 
the American Oriental Society. 

Rev. William T. Reynolds, of North Haven, Conn., a classmate of Dr. 
Crane both in Yale College and at Andover, writes : " We early in our college 
life became somewhat intimate, and he impressed me with his quiet and un- 
assuming demeanor, his sincere piety, his genial and affectionate spirit, the 
singular purity of his character, and his scholarly habits. In his subsequent 
life these qualities characterized him as a man and marked even his later years. 
Without personal ambitions, he seemed desirous to make the most of his 
powers and do well whatever he undertook. After his return from the foreign 



253 

missionary field he employed most of his leisure in preparing an elaborate his- 
tory of his college class. He was a faithful minister and earnest preacher, 
a warm-hearted, genial Christian man, a sympathizing friend, and an affec- 
tionate classmate, whose patient, careful labors in their behalf will be long 
remembered." 

Dr. Crane was married, September 5, 1848, to Marion Dunn Turnbull, of 
West Bloomfield, now Montclair, N. J., daughter of John Turnbull and Mar- 
garet Gibson. She died July 23, 1890. He married, second, September 1, 
1891, Sibylla Adelaide Bailey, of Boston, daughter of Henry Bailey and Eliza- 
beth Bellamy, who survives him ; one son (Yale, 1879, a lawyer in Helena, 
Mont.) and four daughters, the oldest of whom died in infancy at Aintab, 
Turkey. 

Dr. Crane died of paralysis, in Boston, November 29, 1896, aged seventy- 
four years, four months, and seventeen days. 

William Tyler Herrick. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Russell Herrick and Maria Tyler; born in Milton, Vt., Septem- 
ber 24, 1818; fitted for college at Jericho (Vt.) Academy; graduated at the 
University of Vermont, 1839; taught successively in Chelsea and Johnson, Vt, 
in Durham, Canada East, and in Jonesboro, Tenn. ; entered the Seminary in 
1846, but was obliged to leave on account of trouble with his eyes ; returned 
for a part of the next year, 1846-47, and then abandoned study for two years, 
working on a farm in Essex, Vt. ; afterwards resumed study under the counsel 
and aid of Rev. Prof. W. G. T. Shedd (Class of 1843), then in the University 
of Vermont ; licensed to preach by the Winooski Association, at Essex, Vt., 
January 9, i85o. He was ordained pastor of the church at Winooski, Vt., 
May 28, 1851, and remained there three years; was pastor at Candia, N. H., 
1854-58, at Pelham, N. H., 1858-61, at Clarendon, Vt., 1861-72, and at West 
Charleston, Vt., 1872-82 ; was without charge at Elizabethtown, N. Y., 1882-85, 
and at Castleton, Vt., afterwards, until his death. 

Rev. A. W. Wild, of Elizabethtown, N. Y., the historian of Vermont 
churches and ministers, writes of Mr. Herrick: "He was a man of singularly 
quiet but strong character, very clear and logical as a thinker and preacher, 
and universally loved and respected as a pastor. One has said of him: 'A 
manly man, a manly preacher, nothing weak or effeminate about him, yet so 
gentle and kind.' He was, in a word, a 'Christian gentleman.'" 

He was married, February 17, 1848, to Laura Charlotte Hale, of Chelsea, 
Vt., daughter of Harry Hale and Lucinda Eddy, who survives him, with one 
son, three sons having died. 

He died of old age, at Castleton, Vt., November 9, 1896, aged seventy- 
eight years, one month, and fifteen days. 



CLASS OP 1851. 

William Brooks Greene. 

Son of Thomas Greene and Elizabeth Brooks; born in Nantucket, Mass., 
November 8, 1823 ; fitted for college at the high school in Nantucket, under the 
instruction of James B. Thompson (Yale, 1834) ; graduated at Yale College, 1845 ; 



254 

taught successively in Milford and Wethersfield, Conn., and Middleport, N.Y., 
1845-48 ; studied in Union Seminary, 1848-49; in Yale Divinity School, 1849-50, 
and in this Seminary, 1850-51 ; licensed to preach by New Haven East Asso- 
ciation, in the spring of 1850; in Andover as resident licentiate, 1851-52 and 
1853-54, spending the intervening year in the supply of the church at Sterling, 
Mass. He was ordained, November 15, 1855, as pastor of the church in Water- 
ville, Me., and remained there three years; was then in charge of the church at 
Needham, Mass., fourteen years, 1859-73 ; and of the church in Scituate, Mass., 
six years, 1873-79; resided in Needham, 1879-82 (supplying the church there 
1880-81), and after a five years' pastorate in Dighton, Mass., 1882-87, returned 
to Needham, where he remained, without charge and in feeble health, until his 
death. 

Rev. Oliver Crane, D.D. (Class of 1848), Mr. Greene's classmate at Yale 
and secretary of the class, said of him in the class record of 1881 : " Work is 
his delight; and yet, with all his abundant labors as teacher and pastor, he has 
not allowed himself to drift behind the times in anything that stamps the pres- 
ent as an age of progressive and stirring thought." Rev. Perley B. Davis, of 
Dorchester (Class of 1861), writes of him: "Mr. Greene impressed me as a 
man of quiet and unostentatious manner, but of a genial spirit, and scholarly 
and faithful in the discharge of every duty. He sought the favor of God more 
than the applause of men. He was a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost. 
Those who knew him best appreciated him most." 

Mr. Greene was married, January 3, i860, to Ellen Maria Bullen, of Need- 
ham, Mass., daughter of Ichabod Bullen and Rebecca Pedrick, who survives 
him, with one daughter. 

He died of paralysis, at Needham, Mass., September 11, 1895, aged seventy- 
one years, ten months, and three days. 

Henry Wickes. 

Son of Gen. Van Wyck Wickes and Eliza Herriman (and brother of 
Rev. John Wickes, Class of 1846); born in Jamaica, N.Y., February 11, 1821; 
prepared for college under private tuition ; graduated at Marietta College, 
1848; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1848-50, and in this Seminary, 1850-51. 
He was licensed to preach by the New Haven East Association, August 5, 1850, 
and was ordained as pastor of the church in Princeton, Mass., June 16, 1862, 
remaining there three years; was then pastor successively of Congregational 
churches in Guilford, Conn., 1856-58, and Deep River, Conn., 1858-69; and of 
Presbyterian Church in Brighton, N. Y., 1869-74. He resided in Rochester, 
N. Y., from 1874 till the time of his death, with the exception of three years, 
1877-80, when in pastoral service at Alden, N. Y., although often supplying 
churches in the vicinity of Rochester for considerable periods. 

Rev. Richard D. Harlan, pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, of 
Rochester, with which Mr. Wickes was connected, writes of him in the New 
York Evangelist: " By birth and training a moderate conservative, his mind 
was singularly sensitive to any new thought which brought its own evidence 
with it. Although in later years he could take no active part in the strenuous 
forward movement of Christian thought and work, yet he had no sympathy 
with those who always said the old days and the old ways were the best, and 



255 

the modern world was all going wrong. He was one of those men whose faces 
are always set towards the light. Being serenely confident of the ultimate tri- 
umph of the truth, he had in him none of the spirit of contention. Utterly 
unconscious of himself, modest and self-depreciating almost to a fault, he never 
opened his mouth except to say some wise, considerate, or gentle word. His 
nature grew mellower with the years until his presence in any company seemed 
to be felt literally as a benediction. He will live in the memories of all who 
knew him as a rare type of the perfect Christian gentleman." 

He was married, May 8, 1856, to Elizabeth Fawcett Bardwell, of Oxford, 
Mass., daughter of Rev. Horatio Bardwell (Class of 1814) and Rachel Furbush 
(of Andover). She survives him, with two sons and two daughters. One of 
the sons is a graduate of the University of Rochester. 

Mr. Wickes died of cerebral apoplexy, at Rochester, N. Y., March 23, 1897, 
aged seventy-six years, one month, and twelve days. 

CLASS OF 1852. 

Joshua James Blaisdell, D.D. 

Son of Hon. Elijah Blaisdell and Mary Fogg; born in Canaan, N. H., 
February 8, 1827 ; prepared for college under Prof. Ebenezer Adams, at Han- 
over, N. H., and at Kimball Union Academy; graduated at Dartmouth College, 
1846 ; taught in private English and Classical School at Montreal, 1847-48 ; 
read law with his father, at Lebanon, N. H., 1847-49; took th e full course in 
this Seminary, 1849-52, but teaching for one term in Kimball Union Academy, 
1850; licensed by Derry (N. H.) Association, April 13, 1852; remained in the 
Seminary, as resident licentiate, for a short time in the year following. He 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Cincinnati, Ohio, February 27, 1853, as 
pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church in that city, remaining there until 
1859. He became professor of rhetoric and English literature in Beloit Col- 
lege in 1859, and was transferred, in 1864, to the chair of mental and moral 
philosophy, which he filled until the time of his death. 

He was superintendent of schools in Lebanon, N. H., 1847-49, and in 
Beloit, 1861-64. In the Civil War he was chaplain of the Fortieth Wisconsin 
Regiment in its one hundred days' service in the Army of the Tennessee. He 
was a trustee of Lane Theological Seminary and of Downer College in Wis- 
consin. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1873, both from Dart- 
mouth College and from Knox College. He was a member of the American 
Oriental Society, and president of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences and 
Arts, as he was also of the Children's Aid Society and of the Wisconsin Home 
Missionary Society. He was three times delegate to the International Conven- 
tion of Charities and Reforms. Among his published works are the following : 
The Bible in Common Schools ; The Bible in Human Consciousness ; The Cul- 
tivation of American Forests ; Memorial Address at the Fiftieth Anniversary of 
Beloit; The Reformation of Criminals; Suggestions Concerning Methods of 
Psychological Study ; Methods of Science as Being in the Domain of Logic ; 
Lectures on Ethics, on Logic, and on Christian Evidences (the last three being 
privately printed for the use of his classes). 

Rev. George N. J^oardman, D.D., so many years professor of theology in 
Chicago Seminary, furnishes this tribute to his classmate : " Mr. Blaisdell came 



256 

to Andover Seminary in the autumn of 1849 to enter tne junior class, having 
graduated from Dartmouth College three years before. In passing through 
one of the halls he met unexpectedly his college friend, Charles A. Aiken, and 
learned that they were to be again classmates in the study of theology. They 
immediately made arrangements to room together and were from that time 
most intimately associated. Blaisdell's relations with all his classmates were 
those of utmost good will and good fellowship. He instinctively threw into 
a mere salutation on the walk an expression of kindness and interest that im- 
mediately awakened like sentiments in response. He took from the first a high 
position as a scholar and maintained it through the entire course in the Semi- 
nary. He was much interested in Hebrew and continued the study of it in 
later life. In public addresses, in criticism of sermons, in theologic discus- 
sions, he manifested a marked individuality and personal power. In our middle 
year there were six of us who formed a sort of theological club. We all roomed 
in the north end of Bartlet Hall and met on convenient occasions. Of the six 
— N. G. Clark, J. R. Herrick, C. A. Aiken, J. J. Blaisdell, A. H. Quint, and 
myself — none had more pronounced opinions or was more competent to ex- 
press them than Blaisdell. He was, by common consent, recognized as our 
representative when any public expression of the sentiment of the class was to 
be made. There are probably several who remember the paper he prepared on 
the occasion of the death of our classmate, Ireland. He gave in one of our 
class prayer meetings a brief account of his religious experience. The point 
which most impressed us was his regret over his monotonous and mechanical 
Christian life after leaving college. His expression, once or twice repeated, 
was nearly this: 'My religious life was without fresh experiences.' This prob- 
ably indicates his lifelong aim — a constantly renewed spiritual vitality. 

" After seven years of ministerial labor as the immediate successor, in Cin- 
cinnati, of the celebrated Presbyterian preacher, Rev. Thornton A. Mills, D.D., 
he accepted the professorship of rhetoric and English literature in Beloit Col- 
lege, and was transferred to the department of mental and moral philosophy in 
1865. Here he found his congenial field of labor, and for more than thirty 
years discharged the duties of his office not only successfully, but with distin- 
guished honor. His pupils ever regarded him with unbounded admiration and 
affection. Many who had been under his instruction came to the Chicago 
Theological Seminary and uniformly bore the impress of his teaching. They 
were generally among those most thoroughly prepared for professional studies. 
He grounded his pupils in the broad general principles of true thinking and 
true living. He aimed more at the formation of character than at imparting 
information. Philosophy was not to him a scheme of speculation ; he looked 
upon it rather as a method of life, embracing in his estimate ethics, politics, 
and religion. He said repeatedly, ' Philosophy is a virtue.' 

" Professor Blaisdell's sympathies were not bounded by the college cam- 
pus. He took a deep interest in the home missionary affairs of Wisconsin; 
he gave much thought to educational institutions other than his own ; he made 
a study of the condition of prison convicts and the means to be adopted for 
their welfare ; the religious wants of our foreign population attracted his atten- 
tion. He spent no little time in his vacations visiting reformatory schools and 
schools of instruction for the young. These varied works were performed 
under many hindrances. His health was not robust in his student life; his 



257 

college work was performed at best under depressing influences and often 
when he was much enfeebled, while at times he was wholly laid aside by seri- 
ous and prolonged illness. Any notice of Professor Blaisdell would be very 
imperfect that should omit a reference to his religious character. Religion was 
the element in which he lived. He once said that all knowledge implied a 
knowledge of God. He believed the basis of knowledge to be the Divine 
Existence. He seemed conscious of the overshadowing presence of God. His 
prayers gave evidence of a vivid sense of the Divine energy and the Divine 
goodness. Yet he concentrated his thoughts very much on the Incarnate 
Deity, and seemed inclined to refer all problems too profound for human solu- 
tion to the ' Word made flesh.'" 

From the memorial address of President J. D. Eaton, of Beloit College 
(Class of 1875), delivered the day after Professor Blaisdell's death, a brief ex- 
tract is made: "There was no man more truly a scholar than he, and in the 
richest and broadest way. All learning was dear to him ; all truth germane to 
his intellectual life. His mind ranged back and forth through all the ages and 
found kinship in all thinkers. He came to Beloit College richly furnished, be- 
yond most men, in wide spheres of human knowledge and activity. Through- 
out his life he was deeply concerned with truth in many lines; not merely 
philosophy and theology, but politics, the science of the state in its deepest 
meaning ; history in its far reach, bringing the peoples of the world close home 
to his thought and imagination; poetry with all its enkindling power ; art with 
all its study of the ideal. Range after range of human thought was his. Plato 
and Aristotle, ^Eschylus and Sophocles, Dante, Shakespeare and Milton, Mar- 
tineau and Newman and Pusey — these were a few of his companions on the 

journey of life He was doubly beloved because of the breadth of his 

affections. God gave to him a capacious heart. The world of nature, coming 
to him fresh from God's hand, he looked upon with eager and joyful eye. 
There was no human condition outside the reach of his capacious heart. . . . 
He was great in our thought because of his all-absorbing loyalty of faith to 
Christ his Master. He had deliberately taken the service of Christ as his 
service in early life, and into that devotion of himself to the Christian life he 
put the whole force of his being. ... I remember well one day in his study 
when our conversation led him to say, with kindling eye and as if for a moment 
his soul were withdrawn in a vision, ' I desire that this life may so train and so 
discipline me that when I leave it I shall be equipped for any service in the 
world.' " 

Professor Blaisdell was married, February I, 1853, to Susan Ann Allen, of 
Lebanon, N. H., daughter of Dea. Abner Allen and Lydia Edgerton Hough. 
She survives him, with two sons, one of them Rev. James A. Blaisdell, Olivet, 
Mich. ; another son died while a student in Beloit College. 

Professor Blaisdell died of nervous prostration, resulting in melancholia, at 
the Sanitarium in Kenosha, Wis., October 10, 1896, aged sixty-nine years, eight 
months, and two days. 



258 

Alonzo Hall Quint, D.D. 

Son of George Quint and Sally Williams Hall; born in Barnstead, N. H., 
March 22, 1S28; prepared for college at Franklin Academy, Dover, N. H., the 
home of the family; entered Dartmouth College in the middle of the sophomore 
year and graduated 1846 (the youngest member of the class) ; engaged in his 
father's employ, in teaching and in reading medicine, 1846-49 ; took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1849-52 ; licensed to preach by the Pascataqua Asso- 
ciation, at Dover, N. H., April 20, 1852, and remained in Andover for post- 
graduate study, 1852-53. He was ordained as the first pastor of the Mather 
Church, now the Central Church, Jamaica Plain, Mass., December 27, 1853, 
and was dismissed April 23, 1863, the church having given him leave of absence 
from May, 1861, when he became chaplain of the Second Massachusetts Regi- 
ment. He remained in active and arduous service at the front until the sum- 
mer of 1864; was installed pastor of the North Church, New Bedford, Mass., 
July 21, 1864, and remained there eleven years. After his dismission in 1875 
he supplied various churches in the vicinity of Boston for considerable periods, 
the longest service being in the Broadway Church at Somerville, 1881-84, and 
in the church at Allston, which he organized, 1886-90. He was acting professor 
of Sacred Rhetoric at Auburn Theological Seminary, 1890-91, and lecturer on 
Homiletics at Andover Seminary, 1893-95. From 1893 ne resided at West Rox- 
bury, although for several years he had chosen to keep his legal citizenship at 
his early home in Dover, N. H. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Dartmouth College in 
1866, and was a trustee of that college from 1870, presiding at the inauguration 
of President Tucker in 1893. He was elected member of the New England 
Historic Genealogical Society in 1850, while a student in the Seminary, being 
its youngest member, and became a life member in 1861. He was a member 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, of the New Hampshire Historical So- 
ciety, and of the Essex Institute, Salem, and corresponding member of the New 
York Historical Society. He was a member of the Massachusetts Board of 
Education, 1855-61, and corporate member of the American Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Missions from 1867. He was one of the Visitors of Andover 
Theological Seminary from 1892, and secretary of the Board from 1893. He 
was secretary of the Massachusetts General Association, 1855-56, statistical sec- 
retary and editor of its minutes for twenty-five years following, excepting for two 
years during the war, and moderator in 1866, 1882, and 1890. He took a prom- 
inent part in the National Council held in Boston in 1865, writing the " Burial 
Hill Declaration " and editing the minutes of the Council. He was a member 
of the National Council of the Congregational churches of the United States, 
in all its sessions beginning with 187 1, secretary and editor of their minutes 
until 1883, and moderator in 1892. He was vice-president of the International 
Council at London, in 1891. He was for forty- three years a member and for 
thirty-seven years a director in the American Congregational Association, for 
twenty- two years a manager of the Congregational Publishing Society, and sec- 
retary of the Board of Ministerial Aid from 1868. He was scribe of the Massa- 
chusetts Convention of Congregational Ministers, 1868-70, and preached the 
annual convention sermon in 1870 in Brattle Street Church. He was for eleven 
years Grand Chaplain of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge of Free Masons, pre- 
late of the De Molay Commandery of Boston, and also chaplain of the order 



259 

of Odd Fellows. He, General Devens, and another were the first persons in- 
itiated into the Grand Army of the Republic in New England; he helped to 
form Post No. i at New Bedford, and was one of the committee to form the 
national constitution of the organization, and its chaplain-in-chief for four years. 
He was the chaplain at the dedication of the Army and Navy Monument on 
Boston Common in 1877. He represented the city of Dover in the New Hamp- 
shire Legislature in 1881 and 1882. 

He published in 1864 The Potomac and the Rapidan, Army Notes; in 1867, 
Record of the Second Massachusetts Infantry ; and assisted in the preparation of 
the Wentworth Genealogy, 3 vols., 1878. The following, with other occasional 
sermons and addresses, were published: The Christian Patriot's Duty, 1861 ; 
The Trial of Democracy, Massachusetts Election Sermon, 1866; Orations on 
the Fourth of July, 1876, at dedication of Soldiers' Monument, 1877, at the 
250th anniversary of First Parish, 1883, and of Fir st Church, 1888, and at the 
laying of corner stone of City Building, 1891 (all at Dover, N. H.) ; Things 
New and Old, Artillery Election sermon, 1884; and address at the dedication 
of Rollins Chapel and Wilson Hall, Hanover, N. H., 1885. He was one of the 
editors of the Congregational Quarterly, 1859-75, and editor of the Congrega- 
tional Year Book, 1879-83. For many years he was a frequent and well-known 
contributor to the Congregationalist, and wrote a series of more than four hun- 
dred historical articles for the Dover (N. H.) Enquirer. 

This summary, although incomplete, of the offices held and the laborious 
work accomplished by Dr. Quint, in addition to his ministry in important pas- 
torates, suggests the varied and valued service rendered by him to the Congre- 
gational churches during the forty years of his active public life. Of this, Rev. 
Henry Hazen, D.D. (Class of 1857), his successor in statistical work of the de- 
nomination, says : " Dr. Quint came to his work among the Congregational 
churches at a time when a radical and vital question was, whether fellowship 
could be organized and made effective in united action, or whether they needed 
to substitute government for fellowship in order to do the work to which the 
Master called them. And no man has done so much as he to answer this ques- 
tion. As secretary and statistical secretary for twenty-five years of the General 
Association of Massachusetts, he began his work with the editing of their an- 
nual reports, soon extending this work to the country in the Congregational 
Quarterly. This prepared the way for the Boston Council of 1865, in which 
he was a moving spirit; and this led up to the organization of the National 
Council in 187 1 and the International Council twenty years later, in which the 
Puritan faith stood forth before the world an organism, not of authority, but of 
fellowship, for the work of Christ among men. As a wise student of church 
history and of the word of God he saw and seized his opportunity, and never 
faltered in his devotion to it. Large-minded, large-hearted, with a courage and 
patience which never wavered, he served his country on the battlefield and in the 
churches in pastorates and secretaryships ; and the value of his work will be 
permanent and more conspicuous as the years go by." 

Rev. S. J. Humphrey, D.D., of Oak Park, 111., writes of his Andover class- 
mate : "It is an interesting fact that three young men, classmates at Dart- 
mouth, unconverted and intending to study law, should have appeared together 
at Andover, three years after their graduation, to enter the class of juniors in 
1849. These were J. J. Blaisdell, Charles A. Aiken, and Alonzo H. Quint. It 



26o 

was my fortune to be of the same class. Professor Boardman and Secretary 
Clark were also of the number (the latter only for a part of the time), and for 
some part of our course Professor Fisher of Yale and Dr. Vose of Providence 
were in the Seminary. Quint was always a man of mark — independent, posi- 
tive, ready to give a reason for his opinions, and, as I recall my impressions, 
not unwiiling to stand in the attitude of being alone in opposition to some 
points of the theology then taught. He claimed to be " Old School," and did not 
hesitate to stand his ground, and I think Professor Park rather liked it, as it 
gave life and piquancy to the lecture hour. But he was, none the less, a royal 
good fellow, and was held, so far as I remember, in affectionate esteem by the 
entire class. It was my privilege to mention his name to the then infant church 
at Jamaica Plain, which I had served for the first six months in which it was in 
the process of formation. He laid solid foundations there upon which the 
present goodly structure has been reared. His rare tact in management, joined 
with a fine literary quality, a general long-headedness, and a piety which no one 
questioned, gave him the place of prominence and honor toward which he stead- 
ily grew from the beginning." 

A single sentence is added from the tribute given to Dr. Quint as an army 
chaplain, at the memorial service in Park Street Church, December 7, by Rev. 
Dr. Arthur Little of Dorchester (Class of 1864), himself a chaplain : " His 
sympathetic nature, his attractive personality, his capacity for friendship, his 
comprehensive graap of the principles and issues involved in the conflict, his 
unfailing humor, his unflinching courage, his uncompromising devotion to the 
old flag, his ready assumption of dangerous tasks, his generous estimate of men, 
his contagious cheerfulness, his out-and-out manliness, his tender and loving 
care for the wounded and dying, his gentle ministries in behalf of the aching, 
sorrowing hearts at home, his helpful influence with officers high in rank, his 
deep joy in the privilege of such consecrated service, his quiet satisfaction in 
the thought that God's hand was in it all, and his unfaltering confidence in the 
ultimate result — these were qualities and endowments in the character of Dr. 
Quint that brought him a distinction and honor in the chaplaincy accorded to 
few who held that office." 

Dr. Quint was married, January 31, 1854, to Rebecca Page Putnam of 
Salem, Mass., daughter of Capt. Allen Putnam and Eliza Page, who survives 
him. One of his two sons (Dartmouth, 1887) is a journalist in Boston; the 
other completed his theological course at Bangor Seminary last year. His 
daughter (Wellesley, 1890) took a post-graduate year at Dartmouth College, 
received the degree of Master of Arts there in 1896, and is engaged in teaching. 
One son died in infancy, and a daughter of rare gifts and promise died in 
Washington, D. C, during the past year. 

Dr. Quint died of angina pectoris, in Boston, November 4, 1896, aged 
sixty- eight years, seven months, and twelve days. 



26l 

GLASS OF 1853. 

George Esdras Allen. 

Son of James Allen and Abigail Leonard; born in Taunton, Mass., Decem- 
ber 8, 1829; prepared for college at Bristol Academy, Taunton; graduated at 
Brown University, 1850 ; took the full Seminary course in this Seminary, 1850-53, 
remaining for a fourth year, 1853-54. He was ordained as pastor of the Second 
Church, Cambridgeport, Mass., May 19, 1858, Professor Phelps of the Semi- 
nary preaching the sermon, and continued in that pastorate until 1862 ; supplied 
for nearly one year the First Church in Lynn, during the illness of Rev. Parsons 
Cooke, D.D., retaining his residence in Cambridge until 1864; resided after- 
wards in Chelsea, East Somerville, and Norton, occasionally preaching, as 
health and opportunity permitted. He was installed pastor of the church in 
North Reading, Mass., May 12, 1880, and continued as such until 1886; resided 
there until 1888. Becoming a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he 
was ordained as deacon by Bishop Brooks, January 17, 1889, and as priest by 
the same, February 15, 1890. After brief periods of service in South Boston, 
and as assistant to Rev. Henry Hague at St. Matthew's Church, Worcester, he 
became rector of St. James's Church, Fall River, in April, 1890, and there 
remained until his death. 

Rev. Prof. J. O. Murray, D.D., of Princeton College (Class of 1854), 
Mr. Allen's classmate at Brown University and room-mate three years in the 
Seminary, thus writes of him : " He had originally purposed to study medicine, 
but under the influence of a college revival decided to study divinity. In his 
Seminary, as in his college course, he maintained a high scholarship, and be- 
came deeply interested in the study of theology. For this he remained a fourth 
year at Andover. He was a man of somewhat reticent nature, but capable of 
warm and lasting friendships ; a man, too, very frank and outspoken in his con- 
victions. His ideal of the intellectual demands of the ministry was high. If 
any man ever coveted the best gifts, it was George Allen. He was a student 
through and through, and always." Bishop Lawrence (Class of 1875) tnus re " 
ferred to Mr. Allen, in connection with another deceased clergyman, in his 
annual diocesan address: "The same simplicity and goodness marked the 
character of Rev. George E. Allen, rector of St. James's Church, Fall River. 
Of a refined and sensitive nature, he shirked no hard duty, but quietly and 
faithfully did his work. He held the affection of the people, and was cheerful, 
courageous, and devoted. Whatever may be said about the church or the 
ministry by their critics or enemies, such lives as these bear witness to the 
faith, which no man can deny." 

Mr. Allen was married, December 14, 1858, to Mary Arnold Lincoln, of 
Norton, Mass., daughter of Annes Allen and Nancy Arnold, and she sur- 
vives him. 

He died of tuberculosis of the brain, at Fall River, Mass., February 19, 
1896, aged sixty-six years, two months, and eleven days. 



262 

GLASS OF 1854, 

Ira Fayette Pettibone, D.D. 

Son of Dea. Dorus Pettibone and Eliza Ann Pettibone; born in Stock- 
holm, N. Y., March 24, 1824; fitted for college at St. Lawrence Academy, Pots- 
dam, N. Y.; graduated at Union College, 1849; taught in an academy in Sher- 
burne, N.Y., 1849-50, and in a boys' school in Montreal, Canada, 1850-51; 
took the full course in this Seminary, 1851-54; licensed to preach by the Salem 
(Mass.) Association, February 14, 1854. After spending some months in the 
service of the American Sunday School Union, he received appointment to 
missionary work in Turkey under the American Board, was ordained at East 
Stockholm, N. Y., February 28, 1855, and embarked from Boston June 9, 1855. 
He visited the United States several times and returned finally to America in 
1893, ms service for this long period having been in Constantinople, with the 
exception of two years in Tocat, 1858-60. He spent the winter of 1893-94 with 
his classmate and lifelong friend, Rev. Dr. J. E. Rankin, at Howard University, 
Washington, where he delivered lectures on Armenian Missions to the students. 
He resided afterwards in very feeble health at Auburndale, Mass., Chicago and 
Rockford, 111., and Battle Creek (Mich.) Sanitarium, removing to Rockton, 111., 
a few days before his death in 1897. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Middlebury College in 
1885. During the War of the Rebellion he could not be content without some 
part in it ; he came to America, was released by the Board, and while in New 
York City in July, 1864, engaged in superintending the publication of the New 
Testament in Armenian, received his commission as chaplain of the 74th Illinois 
Regiment. He left immediately for Georgia, arriving in the midst of the battle 
of Peach-tree Creek, and remaining in active and valuable service until June, 
1865, a f ter which he returned to his missionary field. 

Rev. W. A. Famsworth, D.D. (Class of 1852), for many years an associate 
in the Western Turkey Mission, and now in this country, sends the following 
tribute: "Dr. Pettibone was a brother beloved. For nearly forty years he 
worked very efficiently as a missionary of the American Board in Turkey. 
Early in his life he did some important pioneer work in the northeast portions 
of Asia Minor. For a time he was a teacher in the Theological Seminary of 
the Mission, then in Tocat. The greater part of his missionary life was spent 
in Constantinople. He had a peculiar power of adaptation. This enabled him 
to engage successfully in nearly every branch of missionary work. For many 
years he was treasurer of the Mission. This office at Constantinople is one of 
great responsibility, and requires much hard work, great business tact, and 
accuracy. Dr. Pettibone met all these requirements most successfully. A 
rapid writer and a good penman, he was secretary of the Mission nearly all the 
time he was connected with it. Much of his time was given to the press, per- 
haps more than to any other department of work. As proof-reader, editor, 
translator, his labors were abundant. Yet despite all his hard work he found 
time for and enjoyed very greatly a game of chess. This love of play never 
left him. He was a very companionable man. Well up with the times, well 
read in literature, with a mind stored with an inexhaustible fund of anecdote 
and illustration, he was an entertaining talker. He had a warm and sympa- 
thetic nature, which secured for him the friendship of everybody, especially of 



263 

children. He was ever ready to do a kindness to whomsoever needed it. Tried 
by our Master's standard, service, he may be called great, for he was 'servant 
of all.' After he returned to Constantinople, in 1865, he worked with all the 
enthusiasm of his nature till failing health compelled him to seek rest. He 
hoped that after a little he might be able to renew his work, but in this he was 
disappointed. The class that graduated at Andover in 1854 included a goodly 
number of men that have done — some of them are still doing — noble service 
for the Master. Among them few, if any, deserve a higher place on the roll 
of honor than the very modest and unselfish, but earnest and faithful man, 
Ira Fayette Pettibone." 

Dr. Pettibone was never married. He died of grippe following paralysis, 
at Rockton, 111., March 31, 1897, aged seventy-three years and seven days. 



GLASS OF 1855. 

Ebenezer Douglass. (Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of William Stewart Douglass and Jane Grant Arthur ; born in Ticon- 
deroga, N. Y., August 7, 1826; fitted for college at Plattsburg (N. Y.) Acad- 
emy ; graduated at Amherst College, 1851 ; taught in Boylston, Mass., and 
North Hampton, N. H. ; took his theological course at Bangor Seminary, grad- 
uating in 1855; licensed to preach by the Penobscot Association, December 19, 
1854; studied as resident licentiate in this Seminary in the summer of 1855. 
He was ordained as pastor of the church at Oldtown, Me., September 5, 1855, 
and remained there until i860; was afterwards pastor of First Church, Bridge- 
water, Mass., 1860-67; of Plymouth Church, Woonsocket, R. I., 1867-71, and 
of Spring Street Church in same city, 1871-73; of Anoka, Minn., 1875-77. In 
addition to this pastoral service he was superintendent of public schools for a 
part of the time of his residence at Woonsocket, R. I. ; was United States Indian 
Agent, under the American Missionary Association, at White Earth, Minn., 
1873-74 ; was connected with the publication of the Minneapolis Citizen in 
1875, an d from 1880 to 1893 conducted employment offices in St. Paul and 
Minneapolis, Minn., residing in the latter city. " He was a successful organizer 
in church work, was energetic and devoted, and in all of his pastorates his work 
produced visible results." One of his brothers, Francis A. Douglass, a gradu- 
ate of Amherst College and Newton Seminary, was a missionary among the 
Telegus ; another, Richard D. Douglass, a graduate of Amherst and Bangor, 
was for a long time superintendent of the Children's Aid Society in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Douglass was married, October 28, 1855, to Helen Maria Graves, of 
Chazy, N. Y., daughter of Harry Graves and Charlotte Gregory. She survives 
him, with one son, a business man in St. Paul, Minn. A daughter died in 1882. 

Mr. Douglass died of paralysis, at Minneapolis, Minn., August 4, 1896, 
aged sixty-nine years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days, his burial being 
on his seventieth birthday. 



264 
CLASS OP 1856. 

Lyman Richards Williston. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Rev. William Richards (Class of 1822, a missionary in the Sand- 
wich Islands, and an influential and honored counsellor of the king and his 
ambassador to England) and Clarissa Lyman ; born in Lahaina, Maui, H. I., 
November 7, 1830; brought to America when five years old to be educated; 
was adopted by Hon. Samuel Williston, of Easthampton, Mass.; prepared for 
college at Williston Seminary; graduated at Amherst College, 1850; teacher 
in Williston Seminary, 1850-53 ; studied in this Seminary two years, 1853-55, 
and at the University of Berlin, 1855-57. He was head master of the Cam- 
bridge (Mass.) High School, 1857-62; principal of the Berkeley Street Private 
School for Young Ladies, established by himself, in Cambridge, 1862-70 ; mas- 
ter of High School for a second term of service, 1870-81 ; member of the 
Board of Supervisors of Boston Schools, 1882-84; master of Girls' Latin 
School, Boston, 1884-91 ; afterwards residing in feeble health at Cambridge. 

Mr. Williston's eminent success in his profession has been recognized by 
Mr. Francis Cogswell, so long the superintendent of Cambridge schools, who 
wrote of "his thorough scholarship, pure taste and elegant culture, his quiet, 
patient vigilance and unwearying industry, by which the whole system is oper- 
ated with the least possible friction ; " and by Mr. Horace E. Scudder, of Cam- 
bridge, who testified to his " scholarship, his eminent common sense, his judg- 
ment, good taste, and familiarity with methods of teaching, his high and 
honorable character, and his unfailing tact in intercourse with teachers." 

Rev. Edward H. Hall, of Brookline, formerly Mr. Williston's pastor in 
Cambridge, sends the following : " Mr. Williston is remembered by the little 
group of American students at the University of Berlin in 1855-56 as one of 
the most scholarly and intelligent of their number. It was at a time when such 
men as Lepsius, Trendelenburg, and Ranke held professorships at Berlin, 
drawing students from all quarters to their lecture rooms, and it is safe to say 
that few of their hearers brought with them better-stored minds or a keener 
spirit of acquisition than L. R. Williston. Knowing very clearly what he came 
to Germany to learn, he was able to turn to better account than many of his 
companions the rich resources and high incentives which German universities 
offer so freely. At the same time he by no means limited himself during his 
travels to the routine of the lecture rooms, but while in Berlin, at least, joined 
with sympathetic companions in courses of reading and investigation, which 
fostered the wide tastes and fine literary instincts which always characterized 
him. Few of our teachers of high schools or academies have brought such 
thorough training or broad and generous culture to their work as Mr. Williston. 
He consecrated ungrudgingly to preparatory schools the mental discipline and 
advanced scholarship usually devoted to college work and reserved for that 
alone. But for the limitations of health by which he was perpetually fettered, 
and against which he so heroically fought, he would have proved even more 
conspicuously that our schools may offer as useful and honorable a field, and 
as high opportunities of distinction, as our colleges. In this respect, if in no 
other, his example was a memorable one; but in many other ways, as well, his 
loss is one which all lovers of the higher education in our country have reason 
to deplore." 



265 

Mr. Williston was married, August 5, 1857, to Annie Eliza Safford Gale 
of Rockport, Mass., daughter of Rev. Wakefield Gale (Class of 1825) and Mary 
Louisa Bigelow, who survives him, with three sons and five daughters; one 
of the sons is professor in Harvard Law School, and another in Ohio State 
University. 

Mr. Williston died of consumption, at Cambridge, Mass., March 8, 1897, 
aged sixty-six years, four months, and one day. 



CLASS OF 1858. 

John Dolbeer Emerson. 

Son of Hon. Abraham Emerson and Abigail Dolbeer ; born in Candia, N. H., 
May 29, 1S2S; fitted for college at Blanchard Academy, Pembroke, N.H. ; grad- 
uated at Dartmouth College, 1853; principal of the Academy at Pembroke, 
1S53-55 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 1855-58; licensed to preach by 
the Andover Association, meeting with Prof. E. P. Barrows, D.D., at Andover, 
February 9, 185S. He was ordained as pastor of the church in Haverhill, N. H., 
October 1, 1S58, and remained there until 1867. He was the pastor of the 
Second Church, Biddeford, Me., 1868-76; acting pastor of the church at Under- 
bill, Vt., 1876-83, and also at Jericho, Vt., 1878-83; without charge at Kenne- 
bunkport, Me., 1883-S8, and at Biddeford, Me., afterwards until his death. 

He published about twenty occasional sermons and an address delivered 
at the sixtieth anniversary of Blanchard Academy, Pembroke, N. H. Rev. A. H. 
Plumb, D.D., of Roxbury, Mass., a Seminary classmate, writes of him : "Rev. 
John D. Emerson has left among his surviving classmates an honored memory 
for his strict fidelity, his sincere and unswerving devotion to worthy ends. It 
was my privilege, both before our intimacy at Andover and through all the 
years since, to have special relations, not infrequently on very memorable occa- 
sions, with numerous early friends of his, among his own kindred and others, 
and in those families to which he was allied by marriage, all of them estimable, 
and some of them eminent, in professional and other walks of life. He had a 
difficult task to maintain the high standards and meet the large expectations 
such associations raised. But for incorruptible integrity, for sturdiness and 
steadiness in moral principle and Christian character, his course commanded 
genuine respect. His loyalty to his classmates and other friends, his endeavor 
to keep alive the relationships of earlier years, and to do with his might what 
his hand found to do of whatever service he might render to God to the last, 
are pleasantly recalled. . . . This 'faithful brother' was a good man and true, 
and he exercised a ministry which was a power for good in building up the 
'Church of the living God.'" Rev. W. J. Batt, of Concord Junction, Mass., 
also of the Class of 1858, writes: "Brother Emerson prized our class meetings 
very much, and at the last meeting, in 1893, as at others, impressed me with 
the earnestness and consecration of his ministry. He was also very happy in 
his work. He saw the bright side of his own life as well as the hopeful aspects 
of the whole work of the church in the world." 

Rev. T. Arthur Frey, Mr. Emerson's successor in the Biddeford pastorate, 
lays of him in the Biddeford Jour n al : " He went forth to labor with a concep- 
tion of God, duty, and sin such as so many illustrious men have gained from 



266 

Andover and Professor Park. But as the years went by, and his experience 
ripened and his thought mellowed, Mr. Emerson saw old truths in a new light. 
He carried what was best in the old school of theology into the new school of 
which he was a cautious follower. Hence his thought never grew old, but like 
the light was fresh and without the wrinkles of age. He enriched his discourses 
with truths gathered by all waters. He was a hard student, writing his sermons 
in a close, painstaking way. He never made pulpit exhortations and long- 
drawn-out wordiness a substitute for hard thinking. . . . Young men will re- 
member him with peculiar tenderness, for many is the young boy whom he has 
taught Latin and Greek and encouraged to go to college. His work with our 
public schools helped as much as anything else to bring them to the efficiency 
which they have reached today. He was a teacher in his deepest instinct, de- 
lighting as much in teaching as in preaching, because he believed the sphere 
of the two was the same, although their functions might be different." 

Mr. Emerson was married, June 2, 1859, to Sarah Jane Dudley, of Candia, 
N. H., daughter of Dea. Samuel Dudley and Judith Pillsbury. She died Sep- 
tember 15, 1862. He married, second, November 25, 1863, Mrs. Elizabeth 
French Bell, daughter of Dea. Nathaniel F. Emerson and Clarissa Goodhue, 
of Chelsea, Mass., and widow of Dr. Charles Bell, of Concord, N. H. She died 
July 28, 1869, and he married, third, August 19, 1873, Lelia Florence Kendall, 
daughter of Nathan Otis Kendall and Susan Eliza Lowe, who survives him. 
Of four sons and four daughters, one son and two daughters have deceased. 
Two sons are graduates of Dartmouth College, one of whom, Rev. Stephen G. 
Emerson, is a Congregational pastor in Moreno, Cal. 

Mr. Emerson died of heart failure following grippe, at Acton, Me., where 
he was temporarily supplying the church, April 13, 1897, aged sixty-eight years, 
ten months, and fourteen days. 



William Anderson McGinley. 

Son of Hon. John McGinley and Eliza McCormick ; born in Fairfield, Pa., 
February 15, 1831; fitted for college in the preparatory department of Penn- 
sylvania College, Gettysburg ; took the freshman and sophomore years at 
Washington and Jefferson College, returning to Pennsylvania College for the 
junior and part of senior years, Class of 1850; studied law at Gettysburg, and 
was there admitted to the bar in 1854; began practice in Toledo, Iowa; was 
instructor for a short time in the State University of Iowa ; was engaged in his 
profession at Muscatine, Iowa, when under the influence of Rev. Alden B. 
Robbins (Class of 1843) he began the Christian life and preparation for the 
Christian ministry. He studied one year at Oberlin, 1856-57, and graduated 
from this Seminary in 1858. He was licensed to preach by the Andover Asso- 
ciation, meeting with Prof. E. P. Barrows at Andover, February 9, 1858, and 
ordained pastor of the church in Shrewsbury, Mass., June 2, 1859, remaining 
there until 1865. His subsequent pastorates were, successively : North Church, 
Newburyport, Mass., 1865-68; Gloversville, N. Y., 1869-74; Ross Street Pres- 
byterian Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1874-78 ; Second Church, Greenfield, Mass., 
1878-79; North Church, Portsmouth, N. H., 1879-89; Emporia, Kan., 1889-91 ; 
Shrewsbury, Mass., a second term, 1891-95; Chula Vista, Cal., from 1895 to 
his death. 



267 

Mr. McGinley twice served in the U. S. Christian Commission in the Army 
of the Potomac, caring for the wounded at the battles of Antietam and Gettys- 
burg. He edited the Rockingham Standard, a temperance paper, for a year, 
while at Portsmouth. He published a war sermon in i860, a historical dis- 
course at the centennial celebration of the North Church, Newburyport, in 
1869, a Report of the Reception of the Greely Arctic Expedition for the Navy 
Department, in 1884, and several occasional sermons. He received the honor- 
ary degree of Master of Arts from Dartmouth College in 1885. 

Rev. George H. Gould, D.D., of Worcester, Mass. (Class of 1853), writes: 
M Brother McGinley was a man of splendid physical build. His whole person- 
ality likewise was forceful and impressive. He was a natural orator, with a 
voice of great tenderness, persuasiveness, and sincerity, and could on occasion 
move large assemblies of people. He was in touch with humanity. He had a 
kind and sympathetic heart, and thus made a royal pastor. He loved the min- 
istry. He loved the old Gospel, and desired no greater joy than to be permitted 
to preach it. For a large part of his life, however, he was handicapped by im- 
perfect health, and hence could not assume the heavy responsibilities and per- 
form the large work that otherwise he would have been grandly qualified to 
undertake. It was the happy ordering of a kind Providence that he could 
come back in his last years to the church of his first love, for although some 
months before his death he sought for purposes of health a more congenial 
clime, yet virtually he began and ended his earthly ministry among the same 
people — a people he deeply loved and who warmly loved him." 

Mr. McGinley was married, July II, i860, to Eliza Burton Fay, of Shrews- 
bury, daughter of Lyman Fay and Judith Batcheller. She survives him, with 
one son, a lawyer in San Diego, Cal., one son having died in infancy. 

Mr. McGinley died of pneumonia, at Chula Vista, Cal., May 25, 1896, aged 
sixty-five years, three months, and ten days. 

CLASS OF 1860. 

Charles Edward Milliken. 

Son of Cyrus Milliken and Mary Smith; born in Fitzwilliam, N. H., Feb- 
ruary 5,1830; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H. ; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1857; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1857-60. He was ordained, September 28, i860, at Littleton, N. H., and was 
pastor of the church there to the close of 1878; was acting pastor in Maynard, 
Mass., 1879-S2; without charge, 1882-84, spending nearly one year abroad; 
acting pastor at Penacook (in Boscawen), N. H., 1884-91, and at Swanzey, N. H., 
from 1891 to the time of his death. 

Rev. George I. Bard, of Walpole, N. H., his Seminary classmate, writes: 
" The man was right who said, ' We do not want more men in the churches, 
but more man. 1 For downright manhood Brother Milliken would rank with 
the first in the Class of i860 ; his profession was not allowed to hinder man- 
hood; he adorned it and was adorned by it. He reached that great honest 
average which, in the ministry, as in all professions, carries the honor of 
heaven and of all sensible men. He had none of the instincts of the explorer ; 
it was not laid on him to be a navigator; he took the map of truth as he found 
it ; he was rooted and grounded in our great, universal Christian history. He 



268 

was anchored in the enduring past. He was an honest man, who put an honest 
message into the hearing of men. He based his appeals to men on the great 
unquestionable materials of the faith that was and is and is to be. He had a 
serene and sturdy understanding, and put out a hand upon general affairs, 
illustrating in his life the relation of affairs to faith. He maintained a fight 
for righteousness in civil matters. He battled, too, with inherited physical ills, 
fighting night and day and in four continents. What he endured in Littleton 
he endured in Leipzig, but he kept himself a sunny-hearted man. He was one 
of the eldest and maturest of the graduates of i860, but I remember the strolls 
we took into the mountains in his first home and mine, and how he reveled in 
the free and pure pastimes of the day with the abandon of a boy, with a cheer 
and an honesty which never failed him. Yet he made work of it to the last ; 
preaching on Sunday, dead on Tuesday, he fell, as he would, in the harness. 
From Littleton all round to Swanzey in this State of New Hampshire he put 
in strenuous work for a strenuous religion." 

Mr. Milliken was married, June 18, 1861, to Sarah Woodbury Duncklee, 
of Francestown, N. H., daughter of Jesse Duncklee and Adaline Cragin. She 
died December 3, 1875, an d he married, second, July 9, 1877, Mary Frances 
Redington, of Littleton, N. H., daughter of Henry Christopher Redington and 
Mary Richardson ; she died January 13, 1882. He married, third, August 20, 
1888, Ellen Augusta Folger, of Concord, N. H., daughter of Allen Folger and 
Delia Maria Barney; she died February 12, 1893. Two sons and one daugh- 
ter : the daughter died at eighteen years of age ; one of the sons, Rev. Charles 
D. Milliken, is a Congregational pastor, lately settled at Canaan, Conn. 

Mr. Milliken died of congestion of the lungs, at Swanzey, N. H., June 16, 
1896, aged sixty-six years, four months, and eleven days. 



CLASS OP 1866. 

William Henry Beard. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Rev. Spencer Field Beard (Class of 1827) and Lucy Ann Leonard; 
born in Norton, Mass., April 1, 1836; prepared for college at Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, graduating in 1861, but was prevented by ill health from pur- 
suing his college course ; took the full course in Union Seminary, New York, 
1862-65 ; attended lectures in this Seminary, as resident licentiate, 1865-66. 
He began to preach in Freedom, Me., October 1, 1866, and was ordained there, 
November 19, 1867, remaining until 1869; acting pastor in Wilton, Me., 1872, 
and in South Killingly, Conn., from 1873 untu " h* s death. 

Rev. S. H. Fellows, of Wauregan, Conn., a ministerial neighbor of Mr. Beard 
during the whole pastorate of the latter in South Killingly, thus writes of him : 
"Mr. Beard was a lover of nature, and his forcible illustrations, drawn from 
familiar objects, made his sermons more than usually impressive. He labored 
with untiring zeal and perseverance in the small field which he was called to 
occupy. His work there was largely for the youth, whom he stimulated, en- 
couraged, and helped to make the most of themselves and the opportunities 
within their reach. Any fitting estimate of his work must take into view his 
influence in molding their characters, broadening their mental horizons, winning 
them to the Saviour, and sending them out to do valiant service for Christ. He 



269 

accepted the responsibilities of the trust committed to him in a small field, and 
was faithful and conscientious in his endeavor to do for his charge all that lay 
in his power. He was full of courage and hope when others despaired and 
went steadily forward, content to do his work and leave results with Him who 
called him to His service. He was a welcome visitor in sick rooms and a 'son 
of consolation ' to bereaved souls. One must have known him intimately to 
appreciate the sterling qualities of the man, the Christian, and the minister. 
His was a life ordered ' according to Christ Jesus,' and such a life cannot be 
a common or unfruitful one." 

Mr. Beard was married, June 10, 1869, to Mary Adelaide Parker, of Mont- 
ville, Conn. , daughter of Abishai Alden Parker and Caroline Fellowes. She sur- 
vives him, with three sons, the oldest of whom is a graduate of Yale College, 
1894, and Yale Divinity School, 1897. 

Mr. Heard died of Bright's disease, at South Killingly, Conn., October 2, 
1896, aged sixty years, six months, and one day. 



GLASS OF 1869. 

Charles Elliott Harwood. 

Son of Abel Harwood and Polly Townsend; born in Enfield, Mass., 
June 16, 1842 ; prepared for college under instruction of his pastor, Rev. Dr. 
Robert McEwen, and at Willi* ton Seminary; graduated at Amherst College, 
1S65; principal of Lawrence Academy, Falmouth, Mass., 1865-66; took the 
full course in this Seminary, 1866-69; licensed by Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. William F. Snow (Class of 1864) a t Lawrence, December 8, 1868. 
He was acting pastor at East Machias, Me., 1869-70; began pastoral service 
at Orleans, Mass., in 1870; was ordained there, June 7, 187 1, and remained 
until 1881 ; traveled in Europe, 1881-82; without charge at Orleans, 1882; pas- 
tor in Wymore, Neb., 1882-84, m Fairfield, Neb., 1884-89, in Presque Isle, Me., 
1890-92; special missionary for Aroostook County, Me., 1892-93; in feeble 
health, at Orleans, Mass., 1893-94; pastor at Cranberry Isles, Me., from Feb- 
ruary, 1894, to the time of his death. 

Mr. Harwood seemed to be a man of one idea — to do good in the name 
of his Master. For several years he had chosen and occupied the hardest kind 
of home missionary fields. The climax of this service was in his faithful, untir- 
ing, almost romantic work for the people of the Cranberry Isles, off Mt. Desert, 
on the coast of Maine. It was an undenominational work, but he had rescued 
an old, unused meeting house from destruction, had united the people in reli- 
gious worship and service, and led them in plans, apparently about to be real- 
ized, for the further renovation of the edifice and the organization of a church. 
His devoted work had enlisted the interest and aid of the residents at North- 
east Harbor connected with the Episcopal Church there, whose rector, Rev. 
Joseph R. Norwood, sends the following tribute: 

M About a year ago I was asked to officiate at a funeral service on Cran- 
berry Island. On landing I met, at the meeting place of pebble and wave, 
Rev. Mr. Harwood. He had extended to me the courtesy of his church in 
which to preach the funeral sermon. We walked together from the beach to 
the church at the head of the procession. On arriving there I returned his 



270 

courtesy by asking him to take a part in the service. He cheerfully consented. 
This is the one time in my life that I ever preached in a church not of my own 
persuasion, and the one experience of my life in conducting a service with a 
clergyman of another denomination. I shall never forget his kindness and 
sweetness of disposition. I afterward introduced him at Northeast Harbor to 
the clergy of Maine and to such men as Dr. Huntington of New York, Arch- 
deacon Tiffany [Class of 1854], and Dr. Homer [Class of 1851]. They were 
all unanimous in their estimate of his devotedness to his work and his polish 
as a gentleman. Bishop Doane often spoke of his labors and faithfulness. In 
fact, he found a warm spot in the hearts of all the summer residents of this 
place by his frankness, push, energy, faithfulness, and zeal. ... I was more 
than surprised, when going to the island after his death, to find his library one 
of the best selected libraries that it has ever been my good fortune to see. It 
was the best confirmative evidence of what I ever found in him ; wide in its 
scope and concentric in its object, containing every form of the best literature, 
both sacred and secular. Wide as that scope was, there was a subtle blending 
and gradual narrowing down to the all- important point within — the better 
knowledge of Christ and His times. ... I believe that his nature had been 
possessed by the Holy Spirit. He had in himself the reflex of the perfect 
humanity of Christ. He was lovingly gentle and transparently unworldly. 
There was nothing of the unsympathetic or the autocratic about him, whether 
with the one or the many. While his mind delved in the abstract, yet it had 
a firm grasp upon the concrete, and his aim was ever the pushing forward of a 
contiguous duty. There was such a whole-heartedness in his service for Christ 
that death could at no period come upon him prematurely." 

Prof. George Harris, D.D., of Andover Seminary, who knew Mr. Harwood 
as his classmate here at Andover, and also at Amherst, adds this note : " Har- 
wood was a faithful minister of the gospel. His devotion to the people on the 
Cranberry Isles was remarkable for its sympathy. He was not a brilliant 
scholar nor a great preacher, but he was a true friend and helper. His inter- 
est in those who were students with him in Amherst College and in this Sem- 
inary was such that he knew the full name, the residence, and the occupation of 
all members of the classes 1862-68, at Amherst, and of the classes 1867-71, 
at Andover. He had the missionary spirit and rendered the entire service of 
a consecrated life." 

Mr. Harwood was never married. He died of cancer of the liver, at 
Orleans, Mass., March 22, 1897, aged fifty-four years, nine months, and 
six days. 



GLASS OF 1878, 
Charles Crombie Bruce. 

Son of Charles French Bruce and Mary Elizabeth Crombie ; born in 
Peterboro, N. H., February 5, 1854; prepared for college at Appleton Acad- 
emy, New Ipswich, N. H.; entered Amherst College in the autumn of 1871, 
but was able to remain for a short time only; taught district schools and en- 
gaged in other work, 1871-75; took the full course in this Seminary, 1875-78; 
licensed to preach by the Derry (N. H.) Association, June 5, 1877. He was 



271 

ordained as pastor at Rowley, Mass., July 2, 1878, and remained there until 
1S82 ; was pastor in Haydenville, Mass., 1882-84 ; pursued a special course of 
study in Amherst College, 1884-86, and was enrolled as one of the Class of 
1875, having previously received the honorary degree of Master of Arts in 
1S81 ; supplied the church at South Deerfield, Mass., 1885-86, and at South 
Amherst, Mass., 1886-87; was without charge at Medford, Mass., 1887-89; 
supplied the church at York, Me., nine months in 1889; acting pastor of Union 
Church, Medford, 1889-91, teaching also in the Roxbury High School, 1890-91 ; 
received a stroke of paralysis in January, 1891, and from September, 1891, re- 
sided at Somerville until his death. 

As shown by the above record, he struggled hard against obstacles in the 
endeavor to complete his education and later to employ himself usefully. 
Overworking in the attempt to preach and teach at the same time, he broke 
down without warning, and was for six years an invalid. Rev. James L. Hill, 
D. D., of Salem, Mass. (Class of 1875), f° r some years a neighbor of Mr. Bruce 
in Medford, writes: "His knowledge of the Bible, of doctrinal history and 
of philosophy, was very accurate, uncommonly extended, and noticeably deep. 
His mental powers were well disciplined, vigorous, and tenacious. He seemed 
to engage in study for the love of it. He had from the beginning a very definite 
purpose of solid improvement, a determination conscientiously made and firmly 
adhered to. His friends at times were led to fear that he would subordinate 
the preacher to the student and teacher. His sermons always contained some 
theological and philosophic truth, and showed the tone and vigor in which his 
mind was kept. He seemed to the last to have some independent bent in his 
study. He appeared to feel that the kind of life a minister leads is more 
marked than in most men, and so all of his faculties were full of activity, in- 
dolent desultory reading was avoided, and abundant materials being accumu- 
lated, and preaching only on the great themes, he kept, by study and daily 
exercise, his mind up to its highest key, so that it could be effectually employed 
at any moment upon the exalted matters of revelation, of duty, and of privilege. 
He filled people full of ideas. Few of our brother graduates have maintained 
such a studious habit." 

Mr. Bruce was married, March I, 1874, to Irene Bassett Greene, of Peter- 
boro, N. H., daughter of Simeon Chase Greene and Sarah Ann Hadley. She 
survives him, with four daughters, a son having died in infancy. 

Mr. Bruce died of paralysis, at Somerville, Mass., January 26, 1897, aged 
forty- two years, eleven months, and twenty-one days. 



CLASS OF 1880. 

Frank Stone Adams. 

Son of Francis James Adams and Susan Fay Stone ; born in Westboro, 
Mass., December 31, 1855; prepared for college at the Westboro High School; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1877, being the salutatorian of his class ; took 
the full course in this Seminary, 1877-80. He was licensed to preach by the 
Suffolk South Association, May 14, 1879, and ordained, October 13, 1880, as 
pastor of the Bethesda Church, Reading, Mass. In 1885 this church and the 
Old South Church in the same town were united. In this enlarged pastorate 



272 

he labored continuously — with the exception of a rest of nine months in 1894, 
demanded by his failing health — until his death. 

Rev. Charles L. Noyes, of Somerville, Mass., his Seminary classmate and 
intimate friend, sends the following tribute: "Frank S. Adams was dearly be- 
loved and admired by all his classmates. He was the youngest of their num- 
ber, and yet in the peculiar attainments of a minister the most uiature. He was 
a superior scholar, thinker, and writer. He had a delicate and genial humor, a 
kindly and cheerful temper, a fine native sensibility, and much acquired culture. 
But it was in spiritual insight and power of expression that he stood apart. He 
was, even in those years, at home in the regions of the spirit, and a rare inter- 
preter of the things of Christ. The ministering spirit was already perfected in 
him ; indeed, he seemed one born with it. Association with him was one of 
the best parts of our training during those three years. We are sure that it 
strengthened our faith and raised our ideal of the Christian man and minister. 
A call to the pastorate in Reading came as a direct result of his record as a 
student and the impression made by his graduating address. In the following 
fall he began his pastorate, notable for its length, seventeen years, and growing 
in power, value, and acceptableness even to the end. A delicate constitution 
did not seem at all to affect the thoroughness of work as a preacher, or his in- 
defatigable industry in a large and widespread parish. One striking event is 
naturally singled out — the uniting, after a schism of forty years, of the two 
Congregational churches of the town. This was the result not simply of patient 
and judicious effort, but of his character and personality. The two bodies were 
drawn together by a common attraction to him, and found in him their bond of 
sympathy and union. He made himself, in the years that followed, so thor- 
oughly the pastor of all without distinction or partiality that they became joined 
in more than a formal unit}', in a oneness in which the old line of division passed 
wholly out of mind. But it is an injustice to estimate this pastorate by any one 
event, for its value lay in its constant service to the hundreds of souls that were 
gradually being molded under his influence, and its worth to the whole town, of 
which he became in a recognized sense the minister. As a beautiful testimony 
of this, on the day of his funeral every business in the place was closed, and a 
quiet like the Sabbath reigned through all the streets. It was a beautiful and 
blessed life work. Though he was taken from it in the prime of his powers 
and usefulness, we cannot call it incomplete. To few is it given to have done 
so much and so well ; to fewer still to have wrought out in character so much 
of the beauty of the likeness of Christ." 

Mr. Adams was married, May 31, 1S81, to Anna E. Eells, of Marietta, 
Ohio, daughter of John Mead Eells and Susan Ann Hooker. She survives 
him, with one son, who is preparing for college. 

Mr. Adams died of heart failure, following an attack of grippe, at Reading, 
Mass., March 9, 1897, aged forty- one years, two months, and eight days. 



273 
CLASS OF 1886. 

Henry Beman Miter. 

Son of Rev. John James Miter, D.D. (pastor of Plymouth Church, Mil- 
waukee), and Elizabeth Denman Ayers; born in Milwaukee, Wis., November 14, 
1S52 ; prepared for college in preparatory department of Ripon College; grad-' 
uated at Ripon College, 1873; teacher in Elmhurst, 111., 1873-75; instructor in 
Latin, Ripon College, 1875-78 ; spent his junior year in this Seminary, 1878-79; 
instructor in Latin, 1879-80, instructor in Greek and principal of preparatory 
school, Ripon College, 1880-83 5 resumed theological study here, 1884-86, and 
remained as member of Advanced Class, 1886-87; having been licensed to 
preach by the Essex South and Salem Association, June 1, 1885, he preached at 
Calumet, Mich, in the summer of 1885, and at Cliftondale, Mass., 1886-87. He 
attended Curry's School of Expression, Boston, 1887-88, and afterwards devoted 
himself entirely to teaching in the special department for which he had been 
carefully fitting himself, being professor of Elocution and Rhetoric in Indiana 
University, Bloomington, Ind., 1888-89 5 professor of Rhetoric and Elocution 
in Washburn College, Topeka, Kan., 1889-90; professor of English Rhetoric 
and Oratory in Marietta College, 1891-95; continued his studies in Boston, 
1 895-96, giving also private instruction at Middlebury College and elsewhere ; 
from October, 1896, at the home of his sister, Mrs. Dr. G. H. Miner, in Hutch- 
inson, Kan. 

Mr. Miter's classmate, Mr. Franklin F. Gunn, of Glens Falls, N. Y., thus 
writes of him : " Mr. Miter joined our class at the beginning of the middle 
year. I was at once drawn to him, and there grew up between us a friendship 
which continued close and steadfast until the end. As a student he was earnest 
and faithful, devout and reverent of spirit, and maintained a manly dignity that 
won the respect of all his classmates. He believed thoroughly in the continu- 
ous revelation of the Heavenly Father in all the processes of the natural world 
and learned many a precious lesson in the woods and fields. He was passion- 
ately fond of flowers, and had exquisite taste in arranging them. More than 
one of the homes of Andover has been brightened and beautified by flowers 
arranged by his hands. I once tramped a number of miles with him to get a 
particular kind of violet that he used to find when at the Seminary several years 
before. I well remember his anxiety on the way lest the flower should no longer 
be in its former place, and his almost boyish glee when he found it growing in 
great abundance. He was just as fond of birds, and had an unusually good 
knowledge of their habits and songs. Music he loved with all his soul, and no 
sacrifice was too great for him to make to satisfy his desire to hear the best 
artists, while he appreciated also the song of the humblest singer who sang 
from the heart. His own voice, rich and sympathetic, he had cultivated until it 
was a perfect instrument of expression. He would often sit at the organ in the 
chapel just at twilight and sing the sweet old songs that had been taught him 
by his sainted mother ; the feeling with which he reproduced them testified to 
his loving, filial heart. His experience in the cultivation of his own voice con- 
vinced him of the great need of proper vocal training for all who were to be- 
come public speakers. In making the decision to become a teacher of elocution 
he believed that he was entering upon the line of Christian work for which he 
was best qualified. His success proved that his choice was a wise one. College 



274 

students and private pupils all agree that in his system there was nothing of 
artificiality and sham, but a constant effort to develop each individual along the 
lines peculiar to himself. This is just what we should expect from a person 
so entirely natural and unaffected as Mr. Miter." 

Rev. S. M. Newman, D.D., of Washington, D.C. (Class of 1871), who was 
Mr. Miter's pastor at Ripon, adds this tribute: " Prof. Henry B. Miter was a 
man of great individuality. His tastes and ambitions were all singularly clear 
to himself and others. They all lay in the direction of utter sincerity and right. 
eousness. He abhorred pretense and sham and artifice of every kind. Noth- 
ing which had deceit in it was palatable to him. His own character was mod- 
eled upon genuine Christian faith, and the aim to be righteous was uppermost. 
He was gentle yet strict with himself first of all. He had a native refinement 
which kept him from all coarse, extravagant expressions of zeal, and made him 
a rare worker in many ways. He was gifted in mind and in the accomplish- 
ments of life. He was fond of music and literature, and could interpret either 
of them beautifully by the voice. He dies in his prime. Many mourn his loss, 
for his genuineness, his gifts, his adherence to faith, his sturdy hold on righteous- 
ness are not always united in one person. Their combination in him was a rare 
and an admirable one." 

Professor Miter was never married. He died of consumption in Hutchin- 
son, Kan., April 3, 1897, aged forty-four years, four months, and nineteen 
days. 

GLASS OF 1894. 
Egbert Smyth Ellis. 

Son of Rev. Thomas Long Ellis (who died while a pastor at Paxton, Mass., 
in 1873) anc * Mary Angelia Hayes; born in Kittery, Me., May 3, 1866; prepared 
for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; graduated at Williams College, 1890 ; 
took the full course in this Seminary, 1891-94; licensed to preach by the An- 
dover Association, at Lowell, December 5, 1893; supplied the United Congre- 
gational Church, Lawrence, 1893-94. Receiving appointment from the Amer- 
ican Board as missionary to Turkey, he was ordained at Andover, June 11, 1894, 
in connection with his classmate, Samuel C. Bartlett, Jr., under similar appoint- 
ment to the Japan Mission, ex-President Bartlett (Class of 1842) preaching the 
sermon and Prof. Egbert C. Smyth offering the ordaining grayer. He em- 
barked from New York September 26, 1894, arrived at Harpoot in November, 
and was in active service at that station until his death. 

Although Mr. Ellis's actual term of service in the missionary field was 
comparatively brief, his life had been one of devotion and diligence in prepa- 
ration for it. In answer to the usual question on the appointment of mission- 
aries, " What length of time did you spend in obtaining your education?" he 
wrote: "Twenty-eight years." To the question, "What led you to think of 
going to the heathen ?" he replied : " The mission of Jesus Christ, especially as 
presented by Joseph Neesima in my academy course." That he might be fitted, 
like Neesima, to preach the gospel of Christ he persevered against all obstacles, 
working his own way, doing whatever his hand found to do, "especially as 
waiter and farmer" — to quote his own words — until his education was finished. 
The same tenacity of purpose and singleness of aim made him a most faithful 



275 

and useful man amid the trying scenes and arduous labors of the Harpoot sta- 
tion during the last two years. It is a touching instance of his self-denying 
zeal in the great work opening before him that when he accompanied Dr. 
Wheeler to Constantinople, and expected to proceed with him on the voyage 
to America, he sent in advance to the secretaries of the Board, urging them 
to secure a passage for him on the first steamer leaving New York after his 
arrival, even though it should be the next hour and preclude the possibility of 
visiting his friends. The trip was not necessary, and he returned to his station 
to work with increasing earnestness and effectiveness in the distribution of re- 
lief and in extended evangelistic tours among the villages. In the coldest day 
of winter he set out to distribute Sabbath School Lesson Books, which had been 
detained at the capital, among the village congregations of Harpoot Plain. 
After visiting several villages he was seized with a chill, but insisted upon 
riding farther to the home of a native pastor, who had previously become much 
attached to him. The Christian brethren of the village cared for him tenderly, 
brought snow from the mountain to cool his fever, and four days later bore his 
body down the mountain side to the wagon waiting on the plain. 

Dr. H. N. Barnum, of Harpoot (Class of 1855), writes to the Missionary 
Rooms: " Today I have done little besides receiving visits from all classes of 
persons who have come to express their sympathy. The priests the other side 
of the city planned to honor the occasion by coming in their church robes, sup- 
posing the funeral would be today. I have been told several times today, ' He 
gave his life for the Armenians, and he has now become a sacrifice for us.' 
One of the most marked characteristics of Mr. Ellis was his sincerity. There 
was no sham in him. He was as sincere in his spiritual life as in everything 
else. He was a true Christian. He was also thoroughly unselfish. Perhaps 
he thought too little of self. He was persistent in whatever he undertook. No 
obstacle would turn him aside from anything which he thought to be right." 

Rev. Alexander P. Bourne, of Exeter, N. H., a classmate at Andover, 
writes: "No member of our class in the Seminary will remain more distinctly 
remembered by his classmates than Ellis. He had wonderful kindness of heart. 
He could never do enough for any one who needed help. Yet with all his 
kindliness of heart he had a remarkable tenacity of purpose. It was never 
stubbornness, but an inflexible pursuit of his duty. In his studies, in his ex- 
ercise, in his missionary purpose, he never wavered from the plan he had de- 
liberately adopted as best. He seemed to have consecrated his life to do, not 
the great things, but the hard things. His first choice of a mission field was 
Africa, because that was both a hard and a needy field. We loved and ad- 
mired Ellis for what he was — an able, faithful, generous, courageous Christian 
man. My missionary zeal will always be quickened whenever I think of the 
associations at Andover — of Missionary Lane, where the great pioneer mis- 
sionaries walked and talked; of Missionary Woods and the rock by the pond 
where they prayed ; and of my devoted classmate, Ellis." 

Mr. Ellis was unmarried. He died of congestion of the brain, at Ichme, 
near Harpoot, Turkey, February 22, 1897, aged thirty years, nine months, and 
nineteen days. 



276 

The preceding list contains thirty names, happily the smallest number of 
deaths reported in any year since the publication of our Necrology. Two 
of the number passed away in middle life and one almost at the threshold of 
his professional career, thus making the average of age considerably lower 
than usual, although reaching seventy years and one day, so that we can still 
say, "The days of our years are threescore years and ten." Nine were over 
eighty, and seven between seventy and eighty. 

Twenty-tsvo were full graduates, six took a partial course here, and two 
studied as resident licentiates. All of the men came to Andover from col- 
lege, with the exception of one resident licentiate. Eight studied at Amherst, 
five at Dartmouth, three each at Williams and Yale, two each at Bowdoin and 
the University of Vermont, one each at Marietta, Pennsylvania, Ripon, Union, 
Brown University, and the University of the City of New York. 

Five were missionaries of the American Board — four of them in Tur- 
key, one of whom, the lamented Ellis, was ordained in Bartlet Chapel only 
three years ago this week, and labored with only too intense zeal in the region 
and shadow of death until his brief day was finished ; another, the patriotic 
Pettibone, sought release from the Board in the midst of the Civil War, 
spent a year of earnest service at the front, and then returned content to his 
field. Two were honored members of the "Iowa Band" — Adams and Rob- 
bins — and Harwood had fewer years of no less devoted home missionary work 
in the East. Professor Blaisdell had an eminent career as an educator. Farn- 
ham had his special work as a librarian, and Cheever as a reformer. Dr. Quint 
stood without a peer as the accepted authority in denominational polity and 
statistics ; while T. J. Clark, W. A. McGinley, and Frank S. Adams repre- 
sented, in three different decades of the Seminary, others who, like them, 
were able, faithful, and successful pastors. 



The following men are still living of classes previous to and including the 
class of 1837 — sixty years ago : 

Age. 

1831. Rev. Prof. Edwards A. Park, D.D., LL.D., Andover, Mass. 88 

1832. Rev. Elias Riggs, D.D., LL.D., Constantinople, Turkey . . 86 

1833. Rev. George W. Kelley, Haverhill, Mass 88 

1834. Rev. John J. Dana, Housatonic, Mass 85 

Mr. Joseph L. Partridge, Brooklyn, N. Y 93 

Prof. Samuel Porter, Washington, D. C 87 

1835. Rev - Bela Fancher, Homer, Mich 90 

Rev. Joseph W. Cross, West Boylston, Mass 89 

1836. Rev. Prof. Joseph Packard, D.D., Theological Seminary, Va. 84 
Rev. Prof. William S. Tyler, D.D., LL.D., Amherst, Mass. 86 

1837. Rev. Samuel H. Emery, D.D., Taunton, Mass 81 

Rev. John Wesley Merrill, D.D., Concord, N. H. ... 89 

Rev. John Pike, D.D., Rowley, Mass 83 



The Alumni Association. 

The Association was reorganized in June, 1895. Its objects are 
to maintain a friendly acquaintance among the Alumni of the Seminary 
and a helpful interest in its welfare, to arrange for the annual meet- 
ing held during Anniversary Week at Andover, to provide for the 
regular distribution of annual catalogues and programs, and especially 
to insure the continued publication of the annual A T ecrology and Ad- 
dress List of members. 

A special and very pleasant reunion of the Alumni was held in 
Boston on the eighth of February last, and a committee appointed to 
arrange for a similar meeting the following winter, if desired by the 
Association. If the interest taken by the Alumni, as shown by their 
more general membership in the Association, shall justify the project, 
a full list of the addresses of all living Alumni will be prepared for 
publication next year. 

All past students of the Seminary and all present and past officers 
of the institution may become members of the Association. The annual 
fee of membership is one dollar, the payment of which entitles the 
member to receive the Seminary publications, including the next General 
Catalogue, which, it is hoped, may be published in 1900. Remittance 
should be made to the Treasurer, Rev. W. L. Ropes, Andover. 

Alumni are urgently requested to aid in securing fullness and accu- 
racy for the annual Necrology by communicating the fact of the death 
of any past student of the Seminary, with any published obituary no- 
tices. These, with changed address, or other information concerning 
the record of living Alumni, should be sent to the Secretary at Andover. 
Class secretaries will confer a special favor by sending their addresses. 



OFFICERS. 



Rev. Perley B. Davis, Class of 1861, Moderator, i8g6. 

Rev. Prof. W. H. Ryder, D.D., Class of 1869,^ 

Rev. Frederick H. Page, Class of 1893, ! ° 

Rev. George H. Gutterson, Class of 1878, f ' 

Rev. George E. Street, Class of 1863, ) 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Class of 1875, Andover, Secretary, 1895-Q8. 

Rev. W. L. Ropes, Class of 1852, Andover, Treasurer, 1895-9S. 



Address List 

OF THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF 

Andover Theological Seminary, 

For 1896-97. 



1S31. Rev. Prof. Edwards A. Park, D.D., LL.D., Andover, Mass. 
1834. Joseph L. Partridge, Esq., 125 Montague St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
1S35. Rev. BELA Fancher, Homer, Mich. 

1836. Rev. William S. Tyler, I). I)., LL.D., Amherst, Mass. 

1837. Rev. Samuel H. Emery, D.D., Taunton, Mass. 

Rev John W. Merrill, D.D., Concord, N. H. (1896-1900.) 
Rev. Ekenezer G. Parsons, Derry, N. H. 
Rev. John Pike, D.D., Rowley, Mass. 
Rev. Erastus W. Thayer, Springfield, 111. 

1838. *Rev. Leander Thompson, North Woburn, Mass. 

Rev. Charles S. Sherman, Manchester Green, Ct. 

1839. Rev. Jacob Chapman, Exeter, N. H. 

1840. Rev. Prof. James D. Butler, LL.D., Madison, Wis. 

1841. *Rev. Mark Gould, Worcester, Mass. 

Rev. George Lyman, Riverside, Cal. 

1842. Rev. Lyman Whiting, D.D., East Charlemont, Mass. 

1843. R ev - Ephraim Adams, D.D., Waterloo, Io. 
Rev. Ebenezer Alden, Marshfield, Mass. 
Rev. William B. Hammond, Rome, N. Y. 

*Rev. Alden B. Robbins, D.D., Muscatine, Io. 
Rev. Edward Robie, D.D., Greenland, N. H. 
Rev. William Salter, D.D., Burlington, Io. 

1844. Rev. Homer H. Benson, Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Rev. Joseph M. R. Eaton, Redlands, Cal. 

Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, D.D., 249 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass. (1896-99.) 
Rev. Leonard Tenney, Waterbury, Vt. 

1845. Rev - Lauren Armsby, Council Grove, Kan. 
Rev. Lucius Q. Curtis, Hartford, Ct. 

Rev. Samuel B. Fairbank, D.D., Kodikanal, Madras Presidency, India. 
Rev. Allen Hazen, D.D., care Prof. H. A. Hazen, Washington, D. C. 
Rev. Prof. J. M. Hoppin, D.D., New Haven, Ct. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D.D., LL.D., 80 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rev. Edward Webb, Oxford, Pa. 

1846. Rev. Charles Cummings, Medford, Mass. (1896-98.) 

Rev. Daniel T. Fiske, D.D., Newburyport, Mass. (1896-98.) 

1 



Rev. Daniel L. Furber, D.D., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Rev. Lewis Grout, West Brattleboro, Vt. 
Rev. Edwin R. Hodgman, Townsend, Mass. 
Rev. William A. Patten, Kingston, N. H. 

1847. Rev. Solomon P. Fay, 1066 Adams St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Rev. G. F. S. Savage, D.D., 628 Washington Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 
Rev. Thomas Wilson, Waterville, N. Y. 

1848. *Rev. Oliver Crane, D.D., LL.D., Boston, Mass. 

1849. Rev. George E. Fisher, North Amherst, Mass. 
Rev. George A. Howard, D.D., Catskill, N. Y. 
Rev. James C. Seagrave, Hinsdale, Mass. 

Rev. Isaac C. White, 195 Court St., Plymouth, Mass. 

1850. Rev. George M. Adams, D.D., Auburndale, Mass. 
Rev. Henry Cummings, Strafford, Vt. 
Warren F. Draper, Esq., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Joshua W. Wellman, D.D., 117 Summer St., Maiden, Mass. 

1851. Rev. George A. Adams, Perrysburg, O. 

Rev. N. A. Hyde, D.D., 710 North Delaware St., Indianapolis, Ind. (1896-98.) 

1852. Rev. Prof. George N. Boardman, D.D., Pittsford, Vt. 

Rev. W. A. Farnsworth, D.D., care American Board, Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Simon J. Humphrey, D.D., Oak Park, 111. 
*Rev. Alonzo H. Quint, D.D., Boston, Mass. 
Rev. William L. Ropes, Andover, Mass. 

1854. Rev. Prof. James O. Murray, D.D., LL.D., Princeton, N. J. 
Rev. Pres. J. E. Rankin, D.D., LL.D., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Charles C. Tiffany, D.D., 37 East 39th St., New York City. 
Rev. Charles C. Torrey, Harvard, Mass. 
Rev. James G. Vose, D.D., Providence, R. I. 

1855. ^ ev - Jo HN Bascom, D.D., LL.D., Williamstown, Mass. 
Rev. Pres. Daniel Bliss, D.D., Beirut, Syria. 

Rev. Prof. George Mooar, D.D., 400 Edwards St., Oakland, Cal. 

Rev. Prof. Egbert C. Smyth, D.D., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Elnathan E. Strong, D.D., Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 

1856. Rev. Joshua Coit, Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Charles Cutler, Tallmadge, O. 

Rev. Lysander Dickerman, 39^ Washington Sq., New York City. 
Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D., Bradford, Mass. 

1857. Rev. James M. Bell, North Leominster, Mass. 
Rev. Ezra H. Byington, D.D., Newton, Mass. 

Rev. L. H. Cobb, D.D., 59 Bible House, New York City. 

Rev. Henry A. Hazen, D.D., Congregational Library, Boston, Mass. 

Prof. W. A. Packard, Ph.D., Princeton, N. J. 

Rev. Prof. J. H. Thayer, D.D., 67 Sparks St., Cambridge, Mass. (1896-98.) 

Rev. Lyman Warner, Salisbury, Ct. 

1858. Rev. William J. Batt, Concord Junction, Mass. 

Rev. Charles R. Bliss, 151 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Rev. Joseph Torrey, D.D., Shirley, Mass. 
Rev. A. S. Twombly, D.D., 44 Franklin St., Newton, Mass. 
Rev. George L. Walker, D.D., Hartford, Ct. 

1859. Rev. William F. Arms, Essex, Ct. 

Prof. Edward P. Crowell, D.D., Amherst, Mass. 



Rev. Abbott E. Kittredge, D.D., 50 East 69th St., New York City 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, D.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Rev. William \V. Livingston, Jaffrey, N. H. 

Rev. William H. Ward, D.D., LL.D, The Independent, New York Citv 

Rev. William Crawford, D.D., Sparta, Wis. 

Rev. John E. Goodrich, 488 Main St., Burlington, Vt. 

Rev. William D. Herrick, Amherst, Mass. 

Rev. Francis H. Johnson, Andover, Mass. (1896-1901.) 

Rev. Augustus Berry, Pelham, N. H. 

Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D., Bible House, New York City. 

Rev. Perley B. Davis, Dorchester, Mass. 

Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., Cambridge, Mass. 

Rev. Edward B. Mason, D.D., Brunswick, Me. 

Prof. Frederick W. Osborne, 286 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. George B. Spalding, D.D., LL.D., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. Charles L. Tappan, Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Daniel H. Evans, D.D., Youngstown, (). 

Rev. Hlnry S. Huntington, Milton, Mass. 

Rev. Prof. Charles M. Mead, D.D., Hartford, Ct. 

Rev. George H. Morss, Moosup, Ct. 

Rev. Azel W. Wild, Elizabethtown, N. Y. 

Rev. Edward L. Clark, D.D., 75 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Samuel Dunham, 35 North St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Rev. Thomas G. Grassie, Ashland, Wis. 

Rev. William S. Hazen, D.D., Northfield, Vt. 

Rev. George R. Leavitt, D.D., 1263 Chapin St., Beloit, Wis. 

Rev. George E. Street, Exeter, N. H. (1896-1898.) 

Rev. Asher H. Wilcox, Norwich Town, Ct. 

Rev. G. H. DeBevoise, Keene, N. H. 

Rev. Josiah E. Kittredge, D.D., Geneseo, N. Y. 

Rev. Edward G. Porter, Ashmont, Dorchester, Mass. 

Rev. Prof. George Huntington, Northfield, Minn. 

Rev. George G. Phipps, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D., 2033 Green St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Samuel W. Dike, LL.D., Auburndale, Mass. 

Rev. James G. Merrill, D.D., Scarboro, Me. 

Rev. Pres. William J. Tucker, D.D., LL.D., Hanover, N. H. 

Rev. Daniel W. Waldron, Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Pres. George W. Andrews, D.D., Talladega, Ala. 

Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, LL.D., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Samuel I. Briant, North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Rev. M. Angelo Dougherty, Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Bradford M. Fullerton, D.D., Brockton, Mass. 

Rev. Prof. Charles B. Sumner, Claremont, Cal. 

Rev. J. L. R. Trask, D.D., 495 Chestnut St., Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. Moseley H. Williams, 1122 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pres. Ezra Brainerd, LL.D., Middlebury, Vt. 

Rev. Prof. John W. Churchill, D.D., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. DeWitt S. Clark, D.D., Salem, Mass. 

Rev. Thomas L. Gulick, Rosemont, Pa. 

Rev. Daniel Merriman, D.D., Worcester, Mass. 



Rev. Prof. John Phelps Taylor, Andover, Mass. 

1869. Rev. L.T. Chamberlain, D.D.,The Chelsea, W. 23d St., N.Y. City. (1896-1900.) 
Rev. Frank G. Clark, Plymouth, N. H. 

Rev. Thomas A. Emerson, Clinton, Ct. 
Rev. Prof. George Harris, D.D., Andover, Mass. 
*Rev. Charles E. Harwood, Cranberry Isles, Me. 
Rev. Henry E. Jewett, Vacaville, Cal. 
Rev. Prof. George T. Ladd, D.D., New Haven, Ct. 
Rev. Leroy M. Pierce, 43 Upton St., Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Cyrus Richardson, D.D., Nashua, N. H. 
Rev. Prof. William H. Ryder, D.D., Andover, Mass. 
Rev. Henry A. Stimson, D.D., 24 West 33d St., New York City. 
Rev. Samuel H. Virgin, D.D., 148 West 120th St., New York City. 

1870. Rev. Amory H. Bradford, D.D., Montclair, N. J. 
Rev. Prof. Edward Y. Hincks, D.D., Andover, Mass. 
Rev. Charles L. Mitchell, Winchester, Mass. 

187 1. Rev. Henry T. Arnold, Plainfield, Ct. 
Rev. James H. Fitts, Newfields, N. H. 
Rev. George A. Jackson, Swampscott, Mass. 
Rev. Theodore C. Pratt, Candia, N. H. 
Rev. Franklin P. Wood, Acton, Mass. 

1872. Rev. Almon T. Clarke, Shelby, Ala. 

Rev. William H. Cobb, D.D., Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Prof. Archibald Duff, LL.D., 51 St. Mary's Road, Bradford, England. 
Rev. James D. Eaton, Chihuahua, Mexico, via El Paso, Texas. 

1873. Rev - Edward G. Selden, 105 Lancaster St., Albany, N. Y. 
Rev. George H. Tilton, North Woburn, Mass. 

1874. Rev. Edward A. Benner, W T ellesley, Mass. 
Rev. S. S. Mathews, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Rev. Edward G. Stone, Westchester, Ct. 
Rev. Charles L. Tomblen, Ashland, Mass. 

1875. R ev - Frank L. Bristol, Uxbridge, Mass. 
Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Andover, Mass. 
Rev. James L. Hill, D.D., Salem, Mass. 
David McGregor Means, Esq , Summit, N. J. 
Rev. William A. Rand, South Seabrook, N. H. 

Thomas Robinson, Asst. U. S. Engineer, Fort Mitchell, Ala. 

1876. Rev. Edmond C. Ingalls, Cochester, Ct. 
Rev. George H. Johnson, Lowell, Mass. 

Rev. John N. Lowell, Box 775, Haverhill, Mass. 

1877. Rev. William S. Ament, Pekin, China. 

Rev. Thomas D. Christie, D.D., Tarsus, Asia Minor. 

Rev. Charles O. Day, Brattleboro, Vt. 

Rev. ALBERT F. Newton, 563 McDonough St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1878. Rev. James L. Fowle, Cesarea, Turkey. 

Rev. George H. Gutterson, Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 

1879. Rev - Stephen G. Barnes, D.D., Longmeadow, Mass. 
Rev. Erastus Blakeslee, 21 Bromfield St., Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Willis D. Leland, Lowell, Mass. 

Rev. Charles P. Mills, Newburyport, Mass. 
Rev. Thomas M. Owen, West Pawlet, Vt 

4 



Rev. William R. Richards, D.D., Plainfield, N. J. 
Rev. Pres. Charles F. Thwing, D.D., LL.D., Cleveland, O. 
Rev. Hastings H. Hart, St. Paul, Minn. 

Rev. Robert M. Higgins, 405 Henry St., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Rev. Charles L. Noyes, 29 Albion St., Somerville, Mass. 
Rev. Frank Palmer, Norwich, Ct. 
Rev. Prof. Arthur H. Pearson, Northfield, Minn. 
Rev. John C. Staples, 163 Maxfield St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Rev. Charles F. Hubbard, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Rev. Charles W. Huntington, 12 Nesmith St., Lowell, Mass. 
Rev. E. A. Slack, Harvard and Marion Sts., Brookline, Mass. 
Rev. James M. Bennett, Marion Station, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, D.D., Detroit, Mich. 
Rev. Harry L. Brickett, Marion, Mass. 
Rev. Joseph H. Chandler, Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rev. Pres. William D. Hyde, D.D., Brunswick, Me. 
Mr. Arthur W. Kelly, Auburndale, Mass. 
Rev. Charles L. Merriam, 380 Wilder St., Lowell, Mass. 
Rev. Darius A. Newton, 130 Main St., Winchester, Mass. 
Rev. Edward C. Porter, Watertown, Mass. 
Rev. J. Spencer Voorhees, West Winsted, Ct. 
Rev. James Alexander, Newport, N. H. 
Rev. Edward Day, Lenox, Mass. 

Rev. Benjamin W. Pennock, 102 Arnold St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Rev. Edgar L. Warren, Westerly, R. I. 
Rev. Samuel V. Cole, Norton, Mass. 
Rev. Harry P. Dewey, Concord, N. H. 
Rev. Robert Humphrey, Mattapoisett, Mass. 
Rev. Charles W. Luck, Ogden, Utah. 
Rev. Davie B. Pratt, 1381 Herkimer St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rev. James C. Alvord, Woonsocket, R. I. 
Rev. John W. Buckham, Salem, Mass. 
Rev. Calvin M. Clark, 22 Webster St., Haverhill, Mass. 
Rev. Elisha A. Keep, Conway, N. H. 
Rev. George F. Kenngott, 296 Liberty St., Lowell, Mass. 
Charles C. Torrey, Ph.D., Andover, Mass. 
Mr. Robert A. Woods, 6 Rollins St., Boston, Mass. 
Rev. Sherman W. Brown, Spencer, Mass. 

Rev. Arthur J. Covell, 1576 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Rev. Allen E. Cross, 71 Westminster St., Springfield, Mass. 
Rev. Harris G. Hale, Brookline, Mass. 
Rev. Robert T. Osgood, Meredith, N. H. 
Rev. William B. Allis, North Conway, N. H. 
Rev. Emery L. Bradford, Boxford, Mass. 
Rev. Charles F. Hersey, New Bedford, Mass. 
Rev. Gainer P. Moore, Olivet, Mich. 

Rev. William W. Ranney, 811 Asylum Ave., Hartford, Ct. 
Rev. Edward R. Stearns, Warren, Me. 
Rev. David L. Yale, Ellsworth, Me. 
Rev. David Kilburn, Pigeon Cove, Mass. 
Rev. Frederick H. Page, Lawrence, Mass. 

5 



Mr. James H. Ropes, Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass. 
1S94. Rev. Ernest L. Baker, Dracut, Mass. 

Rev. Samuel C. Bartlett, Jr., Tottori, Japan. 

Rev. Louis F. Berry, Montclair, N. J. 

Rev. Alexander P. Bourne, Exeter, N. H. 

Rev. Owen E. Hardy, Lyndeborough, N. H. 

Rev. Vernon C. Harrington, Norton, Mass. 

Rev. John R. Horne, Bartlett, N. H. 

Rev. Frank Leonard Luce, Taunton, Mass. 

Rev. Daniel McIntyre, East Barrington, N. H. 

Rev. Henry E. Oxnard, 50 Butler St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Rev. Edward S. Thomas, North Andover Depot, Mass. 

Rev. John J. Walker, Yarmouth, Mass. 

Rev. Frank L. Whipple, West Chester, Pa. 

1895. Rev - Elmer T. Blake, Charlestown, N. H. 
Rev. George S. Mills, Belfast, Me. 

Rev. Henry W. Webb, Grand View, Tenn. 

1896. Rev. Ernest Hamlin Abbott, Fryeburg, Me. 
Rev. Robert A. MacFadden, Andover, Mass. 
Rev. Pres. George M. Ward, Winter Park, Fla. 

1897. George S. Ball, Andover, Mass. 

William T. Bartley, Salem, N. H. (Pastor of Congregational church.) 

Edgar B. French, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Byron F. Gustin, East Pepperell, Mass. 

Frank W. Hodgdon, Andover, Mass. 

William T. Holmes, Providence, R. I. (Assistant minister, Central Church.) 

Halah H. Loud, North Abington, Mass. 

Bernard G. Mattson, Medina, O. (Pastor of Congregational church.) 

George A. Merrill, Pownal, Me. 

Elijah H. Roper, Westford, Mass. (Pastor of Congregational church.) 

Alexander Sloan, Jr., Groveland, Mass. (Pastor of Congregational church.) 

Members of the Association who have died during the year are marked with 
a * The dates in parentheses indicate the advance payment of the annual fee. 
Members who have not paid the membership fee (one dollar), or Alumni desiring 
to join the Association, should remit to the treasurer, Rev. W. L. Ropes, Ando- 
ver, Mass. Change of address, or other information concerning the record of the 
Alumni, should be sent to 

C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary, 

June g, i8gy. Andover, Mass. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1897-98, 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 8, 1898, 

By C. C. CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. 8. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, 14 Beacon Street, 
1898. 



INDEX. 



Class. Age. Page. 

1848. Joseph V. Barks . 81 292 

1862. Thomas M. Boss 61 313 

1851. Justin E. Burbank 72 299 

1858. Joshua M. Chamberlain 72 309 

1848. Ebenezer Cutler 75 293 

1862. Elijah Cutler 69 314 

1853. Stephen R. Dennen 71 302 

1845. David Dimond 80 286 

1854. James M. B. Dwight 71 303 

1846. Caleb Emery 84 290 

1859. George R. Ferguson 67 311 

1870. Jeremiah E. Fullerton 54 316 

1863. Thomas G. Grassie 66 314 

1849. Joseph F. Griggs 74 297 

1881. Sylvester S. Grinnell 47 318 

1845. Allen Hazen 75 288 

1856. Oscar B. Hitchcock 69 306 

1849. George A. Howard 82 295 

1855. Elijah Howe, Jr 69 304 

1855. Jacob Ide 74 305 

1896. James P. King 27 320 

1841. Thomas Laurie 76 283 

1853- William A. McCorkle 73 300 

1844. Simeon Miller 83 285 

1842. Daniel W. Poor 79 284 

1857. Charles C. Salter 65 307 

1853. Charles S. Smith 73 301 

1892. John R. Smith 31 319 

1880. John C. Staples . . • 55 317 

1847. Jeremiah Taylor 80 291 

1848. Daniel H. Temple 74 294 

i860. Charles W. Thompson 65 312 

1849. William G. Tuttle 77 297 

1836. William S. Tyler 87 281 

1850. John R. Upton 78 298 

1845. Edward Webb 78 289 



^sTEOI^OILiOa-'Y". 



ALUMNI. 
GLASS OP 1836. 

William Seymour Tyler, D.D., LL.D. {Non-graduate.) 

Son of Joab Tyler and Nabby Seymour (who, with the original " Nine 
Partners" first settling Harford, came from Attleboro, Mass.); born in Har- 
ford, Pa., September 2, 1810; began to study Latin when seven years old under 
Rev. Lyman Richardson at Harford and completed his preparation there; 
entered the junior class of Hamilton College, 1827 ; entered Amherst College 
in February, 1829, and graduated in 1830; instructor in Amherst Academy, 
1830-31 ; studied in this Seminary, 1831-32; tutor in Amherst College, 1832-34; 
returned here for his Middle year, 1834-35, then followed Dr. Thomas H. Skin- 
ner, Bartlet professor of Sacred Rhetoric, to New York and continued study 
under him (in the theological class out of which grew Union Theological -Sem- 
inary), 1835-36; tutor, Amherst College, 1836, and professor of Latin and 
Greek Languages and Literature, 1836-47 ; of Greek Language and Literature, 
1847-93, an d professor emeritus afterward until his death. 

Professor Tyler received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Harvard 
College in 1857, that of Doctor of Laws from Amherst College in 1871, the 
latter degree being also conferred upon him by Harvard College at its two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary in 1886. He was licensed to preach by the 
Third Presbytery of New York, in session at the lecture room of the Bleecker 
Street Church, New York City, February 29, 1836, with the intention of going 
to the West for home missionary service. The stage-coach refusing to take his 
baggage, he was obliged to wait for the roads to settle, and in the meantime 
received an invitation to fill for a single term an unexpired tutorship at 
Amherst, the acceptance of which changed the whole current of his life and 
gave to that college an uninterrupted and most valuable service of fifty-seven 
years. He was ordained as an evangelist at North Amherst, October 6, 1859, 
Professor Phelps of Andover preaching the sermon, President Stearns offering 
the ordaining prayer, and Rev. Dr. Hitchcock giving the charge. Besides 
preaching in the college chapel he frequently supplied with great acceptance 
and power vacant pulpits in the Connecticut Valley. He was for many years a 
trustee of Williston Seminary, of Mt. Holyoke Seminary and College (for 
twenty years president of the Board), of Smith College, and in earlier years of 
Amherst Academy and Maplewood Institute. 

The following is a partial list of his publications : Germania and Agricola 
of Tacitus; Histories of Tacitus; Plato's Apology and Crito ; Demosthenes de 
Corona; Philippics and Olynthiacs of Demosthenes ; Plutarch on the Delay of 



282 

the Deity (with Prof. H. B. Hackett, Class of 1834) ; Theology of Greek Poets ; 
Prayer for Colleges (premium essay, several editions); Memoir of Henry Lob- 
dell ; History of Amherst College; in addition to which are many anniversary 
and commemorative discourses, tracts, and contributions to quarterlies and 
other periodicals. 

Rev. L. Clark Seelye, D.D., LL.D., president of Smith College (Class of 
i860), sends this tribute : " We are not likely to overestimate the value of Pro- 
fessor Tyler's services to the schools and churches. For over half a century he 
taught successive classes of college students, and impressed them all by his 
accurate and thorough scholarship and his manly Christian character. His 
pupils in many lands will gratefully testify to his worth as a teacher and as a 
man, and to the benefit they received from his instruction. Among scholars 
he was respected as an authority, and his edition of Greek classics, and his 
interpretations of the Greek religion and literature, remain as permanent contri- 
butions to sound learning, and as aids to students and teachers everywhere. 
To Amherst College, as an alumnus and a member of its Faculty, he was 
unswervingly loyal. He gave to it the best energies of his life. Its welfare as 
an organization he ever considered paramount to his private interests or to the 
interests of his own department. He was jealous of its honor and assiduous in 
his efforts to increase its efficiency. In the dark days of its poverty he refused 
to leave it for more lucrative positions ; and to prolong its precarious existence 
he cheerfully relinquished part of his own meagre salary. No one, familiar 
with its history, will deny that to his self-sacrificing devotion and fidelity 
Amherst College is inestimably indebted for its present prosperity. He was 
also in hearty sympathy with other educational institutions, and always ready 
to give them freely the benefit of his counsel. As a trustee of Mt. Holyoke 
College, Williston Seminary, and Smith College, he had great influence in 
shaping their policy, selecting their teachers, and securing their funds. As a 
profound student of educational problems his sagacity was widely recognized, 
and his opinion highly prized by his associate teachers and trustees. In fact, 
there have been few teachers in New England to whom the higher education of 
men and women is more indebted than to Prof. William S. Tyler. 

" His deepest interest, however, was in the advancement of the kingdom 
of heaven. First of all, he was a disciple of Jesus Christ. It was evident to 
all who knew him that his highest purpose in life was to do his Heavenly 
Father's will. His learning was subservient to his religion. His prize essay 
on 'Prayer for Colleges' was the outcome of his own supplications — the 
expression of his constant fellowship with his divine Lord and Master. He 
intended to be a home missionary, and he never lost his missionary interest. 
Although he had no distinct pastoral charge, he was often heard in the college 
church and in neighboring pulpits, bearing ever on his heart the care of all the 
churches, and keenly sensitive to their religious condition. As a preacher his 
style was clear and forcible. He spoke as a messenger of God, with the 
authority of positive convictions. He lacked, indeed, the graces of oratory, but 
he rarely failed to impress an audience by his reasonableness, his moral earnest- 
ness, and his strong religious faith. He was frequently called to assist in 
ecclesiastical councils, and in them his moderation, good sense and Christian 
spirit were relied upon to harmonize discordant elements and to secure wise 
decisions. Without ostentation, but with reverence and persistent faith, he 



283 

diligently sought to establish and strengthen whatsoever things are true and of 
good report ; and when at a ripe old age, respected and beloved by all who 
knew him, he was called to take his kingdom and his crown, he had the satis- 
faction of seeing, in the seeds of knowledge and virtue which he had sown, the 
old marvel repeated — ' There shall be an handful of corn in the earth upon 
the top of the mountains ; the fruit thereof shall shake like Lebanon.' " 

Professor Tyler was married, September 4, 1839, to Amelia Ogden Whit- 
ing, of Binghamton, N. Y., daughter of Mason Whiting and Mary Edwards. 
She survives him, with four sons, all graduates of Amherst College: Mason 
W. Tyler, lawyer in New York City; William W. Tyler, mechanical engineer 
in Dayton, O. ; Henry M. Tyler, professor in Smith College ; John M. Tyler, 
professor in Amherst College. One son died in infancy. 

Professor Tyler died of old age, at Amherst, Mass., November 19, 1897, 
aged eighty- seven years, two months, and seventeen days. 



CLASS OF 1841. 
Thomas Laurie, D.D. 

Son of John Laurie and Jemima Kirk; born in Craigleith, near Edinburgh, 
Scotland, May 19, 1821; came to this country at the age of nine years with 
his parents, who settled at Jacksonville, 111. ; studied in the preparatory depart- 
ment of Illinois College, and graduated at that College, 1838; took the full 
course in this Seminary, 183S-41 ; licensed by the Andover Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson at Andover, April 13, 1841. He was ordained 
as a foreign missionary by the Presbytery of Illinois, at Jacksonville, 111., March 
6, 1842, and after supplying for a few months the Eliot Church in Roxbury, 
Mass., entered the service of the American Board, laboring among the Mountain 
Nestorians until the death of Dr. Grant and the discontinuance of that mission 
in 1844, afterward in the Syrian Mission until 1846. Returning to the United 
States, he supplied the Winthrop Church, Charlestown, Mass., 1847 5 was 
pastor at South Hadley, Mass., 1848-51, and at West Roxbury, Mass., 1851-67; 
after a long trip to the Mediterranean and to his native land, supplied the 
church in Arlington, Mass. (during the absence of the pastor, Rev. D. R. Cady, 
Class of 18415), 1867-68, residing at Chelsea; supplied the High Street Church, 
Providence, R.I., 1868-69 > was ^ rst pas* 01 " of the Pilgrim Church, Providence, 
1869-85, and afterward pastor emeritus until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Williams College in 
1865. He was corporate member of the American Board from 1875, an ^ stated 
secretary of the Rhode Island Conference for twenty years from 1876. His 
published books, mostly relating to the missionary cause, are works of perma- 
nent value : Dr. Grant and the Mountain Nestorians, 1853 ; Woman and Her 
Saviour in Persia, 1863 ; Glimpses of Christ in Holy Scripture, 1868 ; Ely Vol- 
ume, or Missions in Science, 1881 ; Assyrian Echoes of the Word, 1894. In 
addition to these he published several memorial and historical discourses, and 
contributed many articles to the Missionary Herald, the Bibliotheca Sacra, and 
other standard reviews. 

Rev. James G. Vose, D.D., of Providence (Class of 1854), in A Fraternal 
Tribute to the Memory of Dr. Laurie, delivered in the Beneficent and Pilgrim 



284 

Churches, thus speaks of him: "As a preacher he was solemn and devout. 
His doctrines were of the older theology, making much of the divine govern- 
ment and extolling the blessedness and the necessity of hearty submission to 
God. His great central doctrine was the sovereignty of God, and it has some- 
times been said of him that whatever text he set out from, his discourse always 
gravitated toward this. His demeanor in the pulpit was always the same — 
grave and solemn, as in the presence of eternal realities. It was the habit of 
the early times and the Scottish people among whom he had his birth. Life 
had always been to him a serious thing, and entering the ministry before he was 
twenty-one, he had less of the play-time of youth than young men of our day. 
In fact, he was a marked example, we might almost say, of a different age. . . 
Yet in the gravity of Dr. Laurie's demeanor there was nothing forced or pre- 
suming. His prayers were solemn and impressive, enriched by phrases from 
the Scriptures, breathing the spirit of communion with God and loving sub- 
mission to His will. His great kindness of heart was manifest wherever he 
could be of service. . . But though so warmly devoted to the teachings of his 
youth, he never was intolerant to those of different opinions. If it could not 
be said that he was disposed to welcome the advanced theories of the times, or 
to believe in improvements in theology, he kept a warm and affectionate heart 
for his brethren and a cheerful hope in the future. His face was toward the 
future, and he had grand anticipations for the progress of Christ's kingdom. 
. . . Blessed is that union in the Kingdom of Heaven of those tenderly loved 
on earth, and of the great company who, in this and other lands, enjoyed his 
fellowship and listened to his preaching and received help from him in the 
Christian life." 

Dr. Laurie was married, July 21, 1842, to Martha Fletcher Osgood, of 
Chelsea, Mass., daughter of John Osgood and Patty Fletcher of Westford, 
Mass., a graduate of Ipswich Seminary, under Miss Grant and Miss Lyon. 
She died in Mosul, December 16, 1843. He married, second, May 25, 1848, 
Ellen Amanda Ellis, of Chelsea, Mass., daughter of Francis Dana Ellis and 
Sally Fiske. She died March 2, 1896. Two married daughters survive him. 

Dr. Laurie died of paralysis, at Providence, R.I., October 10, 1897, aged 
seventy-six years, four months, and twenty-one days. 



GLASS OF 1842. 

Daniel Warren Poor, D.D. {N on- graduate.) 

Son of Rev. Daniel Poor, D.D. (Class of 1814, forty years missionary of 
the American Board in Ceylon), and Susan Bulfinch ; born in Tillipally, Ceylon, 
August 21, 1818; came to the United States to be educated when twelve years 
old; prepared for college at Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass.; graduated 
at Amherst College, 1837; studied in this Seminary, 1837-38 and 1840-41, 
having been principal of the Randolph (Mass.) Academy, 1838-40; was in- 
structor in Pembroke (N. H.) Academy, fall term of 1841. He was ordained 
over the Central Church, Fairhaven, Mass., March 1, 1843, and dismissed 
January I, 1849; organized the High Street Presbyterian Church, Newark, 
N. J., in 1849, an d was its pastor for twenty years ; pastor of First Presbyterian 
Church, Oakland, Cal., 1869-71 ; professor of Church History in San Francisco 



28 5 

Theological Seminary, 1871-76; secretary of Presbyterian Board of Education, 
Philadelphia, 1876-93; resided there afterwards, without charge, until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the College of New 
Jersey in 1857. He published Address Before Students of Pembroke Academy, 
1S41; Review of Report of Deputation to India, 1856; Address Commemorative 
of Professor Snell, 1 877 ; Select Discourses from the French and German, 1858; 
Baptism not Immersion, 1896; translated (for American edition) Lange's Com- 
mentary on 1 Corinthians, 1868. Dr. Poor was instrumental in organizing the 
San Francisco Theological Seminary, and, especially, in founding the Theolog- 
ical School at Newark for Germans, in whose education and evangelization he 
was ardently interested from the time of his sojourn in Germany in 1848. 

Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D. D., LL. D., of Philadelphia, in his memorial 
address at Dr. Poor's funeral, said : " He was possessed by nature of a strong 
intellect, capable of receiving and using the highest culture. He was loving in 
disposition, generous to a fault, honest and true as the daylight. A man of 
indomitable courage, he had an elasticity of spirit that defied depression. He 
was the least pessimistic man I ever knew. He inherited from his father a 
bright and genial wit, a wit which, unlike that of most witty men, was never 
used to wound. Above all, he was a devoted Christian. Before he entered 
college, while yet a boy, he confessed Christ. From earliest childhood he had 
used his opportunities for spiritual strength. He was a man of prayer, studying 
the word of God, striving to do the duty of the hour ; using the means of grace, 
he grew in grace. In him was developed, as fully as in any man I have ever 
known, that crowning grace of charity of which the apostle writes." 

Dr. Poor was married, October 20, 1847, to Susan Helen Ellis, of Fair- 
haven, Mass., daughter of Capt. Benjamin Ellis and Louisa Damon. She 
survives him, with three sons and two daughters, one daughter having died in 
childhood ; one son, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, is an artist; 
another, who graduated at Princeton College and Columbia Medical College, is 
a physician in New York. 

Dr. Poor died of paralysis, at Newark, N. J., October 11, 1897, aged 
seventy-nine years, one month, and twenty days. 



CLASS OP 1844. 

Simeon Miller. 

Son of Daniel Miller and Parmela Jones; born in Ludlow, Mass., March 
20, 181 5; prepared for college at Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass.; graduated 
at Amherst College, 1840; took the full course in this Seminary, 1841-44; 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Prof. Ralph Emer- 
son at Andover, April 9, 1844. He was acting pastor in Ireland Parish, West 
Springfield (now Holyoke), Mass., 1844-46, was ordained there, May 7, 1846, 
and remained until 1870; was installed pastor of the church in South Deerfield, 
Mass., April 13, 1870, and continued as such until 1872; afterwards resided in 
Springfield, although often spending the summers in Ludlow. He preached at 
Ludlow Mills, 1872-73, at Andover, Conn., 1876-82, at Agawam, Mass., 1883, 
besides supplying other churches for shorter periods. 

Mr. Miller was a member of the School Committee of Holyoke during his 
twenty-five years' pastorate there, for much of the time chairman of the Board, 



286 

and superintendent of schools 1865-66. He also represented Holyoke in the 
Legislature in 1865. 

Rev. William B. Hammond (Class of 1843) writes from Rome, N. Y. : 
"More than fifty years ago I was a classmate of Simeon Miller at Amherst 
College, and recall him as a model Christian man, who lived his religion every 
day, everywhere." Rev. John L. R. Trask, D.D., of Springfield, Mass. (Class 
of [867), who knew Mr. Miller well, both at Holyoke and Springfield, writes 
of him : " Mr. Miller was an acute and vigorous sermonizer. A clear voice 
and a dignified bearing added to the authority with which he spoke. The 
fineness of his feeling was evident in the tenderness and warmth of his pulpit 
manners. The appointments of his nature prevented him from being a stern 
preacher. But the face and form of his Lord were in all his utterances. What 
he was in the sancturary, he was on the street and in his home. If he had an 
enemy, it was never known. He had more tact than many ministers, and a 
quiet, sly humor served him well in difficult places. He was the soul of kind- 
ness. After he ceased to preach, he was a model parishioner. Appreciative, 
slow to criticise, his heart open to all good, ready to cooperate, he set a good 
example to all the congregation. He was loving and friendly to the last. Happy 
as were his years of pastoral service, he made no complaint when old age put 
its injunction upon him. He passed through grave domestic trials as one whose 
support was elsewhere. And this lowly faith was his joy unto the end. He 
used to say that his old teacher, Professor Stuart, admonished the students to 
preach once each year on Humility. Mr. Miller lived the doctrine his professor 
wanted him to preach. And because he was so sincerely humble, he was ex- 
alted amongst his parishioners and friends. And we believe he is exalted still." 

Mr. Miller was married, September II, 1849, to Charlotte Amelia Ewing, 
of Philadelphia, daughter of Noble Ewing and Miriam Wolcott, who died 
October 29, 1851. He married, second, January 3, i860, Lucretia White Lamb, 
of Delaware, O., daughter of Ezra Lamb and Lucretia Bingham White of 
Heath, Mass. She died March 17, 1882. Two daughters and four sons; the 
daughters died in infancy, and one son at the age of seven years ; two sons are 
in business and one a medical student at Dartmouth College. 

Mr. Miller died of apoplexy, at Springfield, Mass., March 29, 1898, aged 
eighty-three years and nine days. 



CLASS OF 1845. 

David Dimond, D.D. 

Son of David Dimond and Elizabeth Rowe Goodhue; born in Groton, 
N. H., April 26, 1816; worked on a farm until fifteen years old; lived with 
relatives in Brighton, Mass. ; fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1842 ; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1842-45, serving as teacher of chemistry in Phillips Academy, 1843-45; was 
licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. 
Taylor, Andover, April 8, 1845. He was commissioned by the American 
Home Missionary Society in the autumn of that year, and with nine other men 
(five of them from Andover Seminary) went to Missouri with Rev. Artemas 
Bullard, D.D., of St. Louis (Class of 1829), the journey occupying nearly three 



287 

weeks. He was stationed at St. Charles, Mo., 1845-46, having been ordained 
by the Presbytery of St. Louis, at St. Louis, April 21, 1846; at Troy, Mo., 
1846-50; Collinsville, 111., 1850-54; professor in Webster College (founded by 
Dr. Bullard) in St. Louis County, Mo., supplying also for a part of the time the 
church at Rock Hill, Mo., 1854-60 ; Brighton, 111., 1860-65; Shelbyville, 111., 
1865-66; Anna, 111., 1866-70; Brighton, 111., 1870-85 (preaching also every 
other Sunday at Monticello Seminary, Godfrey, 111.), and pastor emeritus at 
Brighton afterwards. 

Mr. Dimond received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Dartmouth 
College in 1870. From manuscript notes dictated by him not long before his 
death the following extracts are made concerning the beginning of his long 
home missionary experience: "When I was near the end of my studies at 
Andover in 1845, I heard from Professor Park these words, ' Let us send our 
men like armies and our money like rivers into the great valley.' From Prof. 
B. B. Edwards I heard this : ' The young minister who wishes to do most good 
will place himself with his books and means of influence in some important 
town in the West.' I mentioned to Professor Emerson my thought of coming 
to Missouri, and he replied: ' I wish that many of our young men would go to 
that State with the hope of ultimately doing away with the institution of slavery.' 
In September, 1845, * took leave of my mother at the house where I was born, 
and began my journey West. (On her death in 1888, I had the satisfaction of 
conveying that farm of one hundred and fifty acres to Dartmouth College.) On 
reaching New York City I went to the rooms of the Home Missionary Society. 
In a few minutes in came Dr. Artemas Bullard of the First Church in St. Louis; 
said his wife and children were in the carriage at the door on the way to the 
depot and to the West — 'Go with us.' I regarded it as providential. I had 
heard him in public and in private conversation ; he had written to me about 
coming to Missouri. ... I go back now in my old age to the words of my 
professor at Andover — ' His kingdom is coming,' and I look on in silence and 
admiration at the steady on-going of His truth." 

Rev. Smith H. Hyde, D.D., of Carthage, 111., for many years a close friend 
and co-worker with Dr. Dimond, writes: "Distinguished for modesty, hum- 
bleness of mind, intimate associates and friends appreciated his scholarly 
attainments, his great ability and rare worth. With talents and acquirements 
sufficient for the highest stations, he cheerfully served for the most part in the 
lowest. He ceased to read in 1870, and lived the rest of his days in almost 
total blindness, continuing nevertheless his ministerial labors with cheerful 
courage and marked acceptance until old age prevented further toil. His end 
was peace ; his final words were : ' Safe in Him, safe in Him.' " 

Dr. Dimond married, August 8, 1848, Mary Augusta Coffin, of Hanover, 
N. H., daughter of Sewall Coffin and Betsey Gould. She died July 30, 
187 1. He married, second, October 8, 1872, Mrs. Mary Wingate Waldron, 
daughter of Dr. Stephen Wingate and Hannah Hanson, of Great Falls, N.H., 
and widow of Ira Waldron, of Dover, N. H. She died March 20, 1896. He 
had three sons and two daughters, all dying young. 

He died of paralysis, at Brighton, 111., November 22, 1896, aged eighty 
years, six months, and twenty-seven days. 



288 

Allen Hazen, D.D. 

Son of Rev. Austin Hazen and Frances Mary Dana ; born in Hartford, 
Vt., November 30, 1822; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, 
Meriden, N. H. ; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1842 ; studied in this Sem- 
inary, 1842-45, being during the whole course a roommate of David Dimond, 
whose name is now joined with his in this Necrology ; licensed by the Suffolk 
South Association, meeting with Rev. Ebenezer Burgess, D.D., of Dedham 
(Class of 181 5), July 1, 1845. **e was ordained as a foreign missionary in his 
father's church at Berlin, Vt., July 1, 1846, Rev. Selah B. Treat (Class of 1835) 
preaching the sermon. Sailing for Bombay in the September following, he 
labored in the Marathi Mission of the American Board in western India until 

1872, but spent rive years in the United States, 1858-63, residing in Somers, 
Conn., Springfield, Mass., and Newbury, Vt., and often presenting the cause of 
missions in the churches. After his return from the foreign field in 1872 he 
resided in New Haven, Conn., 1872-74, and was acting pastor at Springfield, 
Mass. (Hope Chapel), 1874: Pomfret, Vt., 1875-77; Norwich, Vt., 1877-79; 
Agawam, Mass., 1 880-8 1 ; Deerfield, Mass., 1882-89; Hartland, Vt., 1889-91. 
He was a delegate to the International Council in London in 1891, and from 
there, accompanied by his daughter, went once more to India and labored three 
years in his old field, largely at his own charges. Returning to the United 
States in 1894, he was for a time at Hartland, Vt., but since 1895 has resided 
with his son, Prof. Henry A. Hazen, at Washington, D. C. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Dartmouth College in 

1873, anc * i' 1 India was a Fellow of the University of Bombay. Rev. Robert M. 
Woods, of Hatfield, Mass. (Class of 1872), who, from an intimate acquaintance 
with and recent visit to the Marathi Mission, is well qualified to speak of Dr. 
Hazen, writes : " Dr. Hazen, with Dr. Bissell and Dr. Fairbank, made at one 
time a most interesting trio in the Marathi Mission field. They were born 
within two weeks of one another. They went to India in the same year, Dr. 
Hazen and Dr. Fairbank in the same ship. During all the years they were 
associated together as missionaries, their harmony, their devotion to each 
other, and their mutual enjoyment formed a noticeable feature in the successful 
working of the Marathi Mission. What Dr. Hazen did and was in India is still 
gratefully remembered there. His talent as a linguist especially came to view, 
and one who visited Ahmednagar only recently testifies to the enthusiastic 
tribute paid by an old Brahmin pundit to Dr. Hazen's superb command of the 
Marathi language. 

"Dr. Hazen was a man of strong affection, full of consideration for others, 
but yet a man of strong convictions and pronounced views. He was an earnest 
patriot as well as a Christian missionary, and held decided views 011 all political 
questions. The story is told of him that he demonstrated, half in joke and half 
in earnest, that the Mexican War was caused by the neglect of a fellow theo- 
logical student to cast his vote — as Dr. Hazen had urged him to do — at an 
important election. After his return from his service in India Dr. Hazen 
adjusted himself with tact to pastoral work, and proved himself an able, faith- 
ful minister, but his heart never left the Marathi Mission. His opportunity to 
be in the work there for a second time gave him experiences of joy which his 
friends shared with him, and which might well have made him an object ©f 
envy to all observers." 



289 

Dr. Hazen was married, September 18, 1846, to Martha Ramsay Chapin 
of Somers, Conn., daughter of Oliver Chapin and Anna Pierce, a graduate of 
Mt. Holyoke Female Seminary, and sister of Miss Mary Chapin, principal of 
the Seminary, as also of Rev. W. W. Chapin (Class of 1863), missionary in 
India. She died January 24, 1884. He had three sons and four daughters; 
one son and two daughters died in infancy, and William O. Hazen, Dartmouth', 
1871, while on a voyage to India for his health in his senior year, died at sea 
and was buried at Malta. A daughter, Mrs. L. S. Gates, is in the Marathi 
Mission at Sholapur, and another, Miss Mary S. Hazen, has cared for her 
father; Henry Allen Hazen, Dartmouth, 1871, is in the Weather Bureau service 
at Washington. 

Dr. Hazen died of cerebral effusion, at Washington, D. C, May 12, 1898, 
aged seventy-five years, five months, and twelve days. 



Edward Webb. 

Son of Thomas Webb and Susan Grimsby; born in Lowestoft, Suffolk 
County, England, December 15, 1819; studied in King Edward's Grammar 
School at Bury St. Edmunds, continuing classical and other studies privately 
with Rev. Thomas Quinton Stow, whom he accompanied to Australia, doing 
there some mission work ; returned to England in 1842 and followed his mother 
and family to America; took the full course in this Seminary, 1842-45; licensed 
by the Brookfield (Mass.) Association, January 8, 1845. He was ordained as a 
foreign missionary at Ware, Mass., October 23, 1845 ( Dr - Rufus Anderson, 
Class of 1822, preaching the sermon), and for nineteen years was a missionary 
of the American Board in the Madura District, India, returning to the United 
States in impaired health in 1864. He was stated supply of the First Presby- 
terian Church in Darby, Pa., 1864-66; pastor of Pencader Presbyterian Church, 
Glasgow, Del., 1866-71, and at Andover, N. J., 1871-73; was afterwards finan- 
cial secretary of the Lincoln (Pa.) University (and pastor of Ashmun Church of 
the University, 1873-76), until his death. 

Rev. W. P. White, D.D., says of Mr. Webb in the Presbyterian Journal : 
" He had remarkable linguistic ability, and was one of the committee on the 
revision of the Tamil Bible, and along with Dr. Green was the author of rules 
for the translation of scientific terms into the Tamil language, which are still 
in use in the mission field. He gave much attention to hymnology, and has 
been called the father of Christian- Tamil music. He issued, while in India, 
two editions of native Tamil hymns set to Tamil tunes." Mr. Webb originated 
and edited the Quarterly Repository in India, and prepared also the Theological 
Class Book and other books in the Tamil. He read at different times before 
the American Oriental Society, of which he was a member, valuable papers on 
Tamil Music. 

Rev. Josiah E. Kittredge, D.D., of Geneseo, N. Y. (Class of 1864), writes: 
"A twenty years' acquaintance with this friend, Rev. Edward Webb, has left 
with me the memory of a very pure and attractive life. He was a man of 
accurate scholarship, a clear thinker, and one who spoke only that which he 
profoundly believed. He was methodical, earnest, genial, and most gracious in 
spirit and manner. In spite of feeble health for many years he was a pattern 
of faithfulness and large accomplishment, whether in the service of India mis- 



290 

sions or of Lincoln University. His attachments were strong and his domestic 
life delightful. It was a charm to have him in the sacred intimacies of the 
home. He bore about with him the serenity which genuine faith imparts. He 
was singularly rich in his spiritual experience. He seemed to us who knew him 
a sort of Enoch. He knew God, he loved Him, he walked with Him, and he 
was not, for God took him." 

Mr. Webb was married, September 30, 1845, to Nancy Allyn Foote, of 
Cayuga, N. Y., daughter of Lucius Chittenden Foote and Rebecca Saltonstall 
Allyn. Of four sons and four daughters, two infant sons died of cholera in one 
night in India, where a daughter of six years is also buried; one son is an 
editor and publisher in St. Paul, Minn., the other a Presbyterian minister at 
Lakewood, N. J. ; Miss Anna F. Webb, a missionary teacher, has recently 
been compelled to retire from the American Board's station at San Sebastian, 
Spain, one daughter is a physician in Oxford, Pa., and a married daughter 
resides in Delaware. 

Mr. Webb died of heart failure, while on his way from Oxford to Phila- 
delphia, Pa., April 6, 1898, aged seventy-eight years, three months, and 
twenty- one days. 



GLASS OF 1846. 

Caleb Emery. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of William Emery and Elizabeth Emery ; born in Sanford, Me., March 
18, 1813; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover ; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1842; studied in the Seminary nearly two years, but having 
decided to make teaching his profession, left in June, 1846; he had previously 
taught in Wakefield (N.H.) Academy, 1842, select schools at Westboro, Mass., 
1844, and at Nashua, N.H., 1845; was tnen principal of Pinkerton Academy, 
Derry, N.H., 1846-48; first principal of the Charlestown (Mass.) High School, 
1848-50; sub-master of Boston Latin School, 1850-55; principal of a private 
school for young ladies, Boston, 1855-63 ; again principal of the Charlestown 
High School, 1864-85. Retiring from active service in 1885, he resided in 
Boston until 1893, and afterwards in Brookline, Mass. 

Mr. Charles Cummings, of Medford, Mass., a classmate of Mr. Emery both 
at Dartmouth and at Andover, who like him has made teaching his life-work, 
writes of him : " In college Mr. Emery was regarded as a model in judgment, 
deportment, and scholarship, and was consequently held in high esteem. His 
influence in the class was superior to that of any other man. He was by nature 
preeminently qualified for the teacher's chair. Under perfect self-control, 
patient, discreet, sympathetic, firm, dignified, and scholarly, he was a master 
of the teaching art. His pupils could but love and obey him." 

Rev. Alexander Twombly, D.D. (Class of 1858), who, as pastor of the 
Winthrop Church in Charlestown, knew Mr. Emery well, sends this tribute : 
" As a man he was somewhat diffident and unobtrusive, but firm in his princi- 
ples. When he took a position in morals or religion he defended it to the last. 
He was progressive in thought, kind in act, benevolent and true. No man was 
ever more genial at home or more respected abroad. As a teacher his scholar- 
ship was ripe and his methods of administration gentle but unwavering. He 



291 

won the respect of his pupils by his courtly manners, while at the same time he 
held the reins of authority with a firm hand. Many a student has been assisted 
by him in private and encouraged to pursue his studies. To those of his 
scholars who sought his aid he was a constant and unvarying counsellor and 
friend. In the church he was a valued officer, and although modest and unas- 
suming accepted such duties as were requested of him. In his place at all 
times, he gave dignity to worship by his presence, and in public exercises was 
edifying and spiritual. In his later years he was faithful to his friends and to 
his pastor, and his memory will be cherished by many whose lives were exalted 
by his companionship and whose faith was strengthened by his steadfast piety." 

Mr. Emery married, August 16, 1848, Marcia Perkins Choate, of Derry, 
N. H., daughter of Isaac Perkins Choate and Eliza Jane Harper. She survives 
him, with one daughter, a son having died at the age of twenty years. 

He died of heart failure, at Brookline, Mass., December 1, 1897, aged 
eighty-four years, eight months, and thirteen days. 



GLASS OF 1847. 

Jeremiah Taylor, D. D. (Non-graduate.) 

Son of Capt. Jeremiah Taylor and Martha Shaw Alden ; born in Hawley, 
Mass., June II, 1817; prepared for college in the academies at Worthington 
and Cummington, Mass.; graduated at Amherst College, 1843; was principal 
of Amherst Academy, 1843-44; studied in this Seminary, 1844-45, an< ^ com- 
pleted his theological course at Princeton Seminary, 1845-47 ; was licensed by 
the Presbytery of Brunswick, N. J., April 29, 1846. He was ordained pastor 
of the church in Wenham, Mass., October 27, 1847, and remained there until 
1856; was pastor of the First Church, Middletown, Conn., 1856-68; of the 
church at West Killingly, Conn., 1869-72 ; of the Elmwood Church, Provi- 
dence, R. I., 1872-77; was secretary of the Rhode Island Missionary Society, 
residing at Providence, 1876-86; from 1887, the New England secretary of the 
American Tract Society, residing at Brookline, where for four years previous 
to 1897 he was pastor's assistant to Rev. Reuen Thomas, D. D. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst College in 
1863. He was the descendant of a long line of ministers, including Rev. Tim- 
othy Alden, of Yarmouth, Rev. Habijah Weld, of Attleboro, Rev. Thomas 
Weld of Dunstable, Rev. John Fox and Rev. Jabez Fox, of Woburn. Three 
of his brothers were ministers : Rev. Oliver Alden Taylor (Class of 1829), Rev. 
Timothy Alden Taylor (Class of 1838), and Rev. Rufus Taylor. He was reared 
in that hill- country district in Western Massachusetts where, within a few miles 
of each other as to place and a few days of each other as to time, were born 
Levi Parsons (Class of 1817), Pliny Fisk (Class of 1818), and Jonas King (Class 
of 1819), the first American missionaries to Jerusalem. He published The 
Patriot Soldier (a memoir of Edward Hamilton Brewer), and a few historical 
discourses. 

From a memorial sermon delivered in the Harvard Church, Brookline, on 
the Sabbath evening after his death, by Rev. Reuen Thomas, D. D., these ex- 
tracts are made : " He was a type of the old New England clergyman, every 
inch a gentleman, always sunny, but never frivolous, living as in the great Task- 



292 

master's eye, good to look upon, good to meet with, a smile for every child, and 
a word for every young man or woman. The very air seemed purer because he 
breathed it. One could scarcely conceive that he could do wrong if he tried. 
With a dignified personal presence and a reverential self-respect, it was easy to 
perceive that at heart he was a self-distrustful, genuinely humble man. . . . His 
long life had been bright and beautiful. He had passed from one duty to an- 
other with no indolent periods of transition. Wherever he had been he had 
been trusted and honored — certainly not less so here, where his last years have 
been spent. . . . His life was a unit. It was in harmony with itself. Christ 
was its center and all the radii in it focused themselves there. The intellect, 
the will, the conscience, the imagination, the affections, were all subordinated 
to that allegiance he owed to Christ, and all pulled together in one direction. 
Hence the consistency of his life and the influence which radiated from it." 

Dr. Taylor was married, October 17, 1849, to Elizabeth Pride, of Spring- 
ville, Pa., daughter of Dr. William W. Pride and Hannah Thacher. She 
survives him, with one son and two daughters ; one son died in infancy and one 
at the age of sixteen. 

Dr. Taylor died of general debility, at Brookline, Mass., April 20, 1898, 
aged eighty years, ten months, and nine days. 



GLASS OF 1848. 

Joseph Vanhorn Barks. 

Son of Solomon Barks and Jane Shaul (both from Virginia) ; born in 
Baltimore, Fairfield Co., O., September 15, 1817; fitted for college at Gran- 
ville (O.) Academy; graduated at Marietta College, 1845; studied in Lane 
Theological Seminary, 1845-47 ; graduated at this Seminary, 1848 ; licensed 
by Pataskala Presbytery (New School), at Jersey, 0-, June 23, 1847; he im- 
mediately entered the home missionary field in Missouri, his first pastorate 
at Warsaw (where he was ordained by the Oregon Presbytery in April, 1849) 
extending from 1848 to 1863, when it was broken up by the conflicts of the 
war. He was then pastor of the Lick Creek church, Perry, 1863-64; at Troy, 
1864-69; at Perry again, 1869-85; at Waverley, 1885-90; afterwards residing 
at Odessa, but continuing to preach in small churches at different points until 
his death. 

Rev. Henry Bushnell, of Westerville, O., who was a classmate of Mr. 
Barks at Granville Academy, at Marietta College, at Lane Seminary, and at 
Andover, writes of him : " He was rather advanced in years when he came to 
Granville to begin his preparatory studies for the ministry, but he was resolute 
and diligent. He was an athlete in the sports of the young men, and had a 
generous spirit that endeared him to his companions. He was at once received 
into the best society of the place, and always maintained a good standing in 
scholarship. He was particularly gifted in oratory and generally led the school 
in such exercises. After graduating at Marietta he went with four of his class- 
mates to Lane Seminary, and sat for two years under the instruction of Drs. 
Beecher, Stowe, and Allen. Going with two of these classmates to Andover, he 
condensed into one year the studies of two, taking Professor Park's lectures in 
addition to those of the senior course. During the year his sympathies turned 



293 

toward the South, so that after his marriage to a daughter of one of Granville's 
best families he accepted a commission as home missionary in southwestern 
Missouri, and within the borders of that State the rest of his life was spent 
The impression abides with me of his lovable character. He was a diligent 
consecrated, and moderately successful minister. He was fearless and firm in 
his convictions." 

Mr. Barks was married, October 10, 1848, to Diana Lydia Bancroft, of 
Granville, O., daughter of Judge Samuel Bancroft and Clarissa Rose. She 
survives him, with three sons — a minister, a teacher, and an editor — and one 
daughter; one son, a physician, and two daughters, have deceased. 

Mr. Barks died of obstruction of the bowels, at Odessa, Mo., March 29, 
1898, aged eighty-one years, six months, and fourteen days. 

Ebenezer Cutler, D.D. 

Son of Ezekiel Cutler and Betsey Atkins; born in Royalston, Mass., 
August 21, 1822; the family having removed to Waterford, Vt., in his infancy, 
he prepared for college at Newbury (Vt.) Seminary ; graduated at the University 
of Vermont, 1845; took the IuI1 course in this Seminary, 1845-48; was licensed 
to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, 
at Andover, April 11, 1S48. He supplied successively the churches in Derby 
and St. Albans, Vt., 1848-49, and was ordained over the latter, March 6, 1850, 
remaining in that pastorate until 1855. He was installed as pastor of the Uniun 
Church, Worcester, Mass., September 6, 1855, and continued in office for 
twenty- five years, being afterwards pastor emeritus until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of Ver- 
mont in 1866, and was a member of the Corporation of the University, 1853-57. 
He was a member of the American Antiquarian Society, and Rev. Daniel Mer- 
riman, D.D., of Worcester (Class of 1868), read a biographical sketch of him 
before the Society at its last semi-annual session. Two of his sermons were 
published : The Rights of the Sword, a Thanksgiving discourse, in 1861, and 
Social Privileges and Obligations, 1874. He was one of the editors of the Con- 
gregational Review for three years. 

Rev. Amos H. Coolidge (Class of 1856), for thirty-five years pastor at 
Leicester, adjoining Worcester, sends this tribute : "My acquaintance with Dr. 
Cutler extended over a period of more than forty years, beginning with the time 
when, as a timid divinity student, I came to be examined before that august and 
venerable body of men, the Worcester Central Association, and continuing to 
the end of his life. It was manifest to all that his thinking was deep and dis- 
criminating, his scholarship thorough and accurate, and his literary taste 
severely chaste and critical. It took time to understand him, and only those 
knew him who knew him well. Such learned that, definite and precise as he 
was, there ran through his thinking a highly imaginative and poetic vein, and 
that his grave and reverent manner concealed the play of a keen humor and 
wit, which at times bubbled up unexpectedly. They recognized, too, as they 
came into possession of it, the hidden wealth of his faithful, sympathetic, and 
enduring friendship. He held intelligently and firmly the great central truths 
of evangelical religion. He scorned sensationalism, but he impressed his 
hearers by the force and originality of his thought, his clearly cut and incisive 



294 

style, and his earnest sincerity. He bore the trial of eighteen years of feeble- 
ness and consequent retirement from active service with serene and heroic 
resignation. Retaining the full vigor of his fertile mind to the end, he awaited 
in faith and hope the steadily approaching change and then closed his eyes, 
calmly as to a night's repose.' " 

From the memorial discourse preached at his funeral by Rev. George H. 
Gould, D.D., of Worcester (Class of 1853), the following extract is taken: 
"Dr. Cutler was preeminently a character builder. He was one of God's 
master workmen in this city for nearly a generation. He built not with wood, 
hay and stubble, but with gold, silver and precious stones. He planted his 
whole ministry unshrinkingly on God's book, and from this inexhaustible 
quarry he excavated vast foundation principles, with which he has underpinned 
largely, even down to the present day, the whole domestic, municipal, and 
spiritual life of Union Church. . . . Dr. Cutler was thus called to be largely an 
educator of educators — an invisible force behind visible forces, a power behind 
the bench, the school, the bar, the counting desk, the municipality. He believed 
in the Ten Commandments, in the whole Bible from cover to cover, as an in- 
errant text-book for the schooling of men in practical righteousness ; in the 
New England Sabbath as the only conservator, in the long run, of American 
homes, the American church, the American commonwealth. Believing these 
things, he preached them fearlessly and faithfully, and so that his people could 
understand them. And let me say to you that the Worcester of today would 
be a very different city from what it is, if a generation ago Ebenezer Cutler had 
not lived and wrought for God within its borders." 

Dr. Cutler was married, July 25, 1849, to Experience Jane Charlton, of 
Littleton, N.H., daughter of John Charlton and Experience Mason. She died 
June 5, 1859. He married, second, January 10, 1861, Marion Chappelle Eaton, 
of Worcester, daughter of Rev. William Eaton (Class of 181 3) and Lydia San- 
ford, who survives him. A son, George Rutherford Cutler, a graduate of the 
University of Vermont and of Boston University Law School, resides at the 
West ; a son died at seven years, and a daughter at fourteen. 

Dr. Cutler died of pneumonia, at Worcester, Mass., January 16, 1898, aged 
seventy-five years, four months, and twenty-six days. 



Daniel Herbert Temple. {Resident Student.) 

Son of Rev. Daniel Temple (Class of 1820) and Rachel Baker-Dix (sister 
of Gen. John A. Dix) ; born in Valetta, Malta (where his father was mission- 
ary), November 13, 1822 ; prepared for college under the tuition of his father 
at Smyrna, and if Nicholas Petrocokino, a native Greek (Amherst College, 
1829); came to this country in 1840; entered sophomore class, Amherst Col- 
lege, graduating in 1843; instructor in Westfield (Mass.) Academy, 1843-44; 
principal of Monson (Mass.) Academy, 1844; studied in Bangor Theological 
Seminary, 1844-45, teaching also in a private school there ; principal of Wash- 
ington Academy, East Machias, Me., 1845-47 ; studied in this Seminary as 
resident student, 1847-48 ; licensed to preach by Andover Association, meeting 
with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, April 11, 1848. He taught a classical and Eng- 
lish school in Chicago, 1849-51 ; was ordained at Beardstown, 111., May 25, 



295 

i8si, remaining there as pastor until 1854; preached at Sturbridge, Mass., in 
1855; at Dixon, 111., 1855-56; and at Aurora, 111., 1856-63. Feeling then 
compelled, on account of his wife's health, to leave the active ministry, he 
removed to Brooklyn, N. Y., and after one year to Bloomfield, N. J., where he 
resided until 1872. During this period he was extensively engaged in business, 
especially in exploring and working oil properties, being connected also with 
the reorganization of the Ohio and Mississippi and the Atlantic and Great 
Western railroads and going over the lines with Mr. Wells, of Wells, Fargo 
and Company, and Sir Morton Pito, an English capitalist. From 1872 to 1884 
he resided in San Francisco, Cal., supplying the Presbyterian churches at 
Concord, Martinez, and Bolines, 1878-80, and at Menlo Park, 1881-83, having 
also a private school at Menlo Park, with Leland Stanford, Jr., as a special 
student. He was then honorably retired from the ministry, and afterward 
resided at Los Gatos, occasionally preaching, teaching in the Los Gatos High 
School, 1893-95, and having private pupils until within a week of his death. 

He published in 1854 the Ltfe and Letters of Rev. Daniel Temple, his 
father, and was a frequent contributor to the New York Evangelist. Senator 
E. B. Conklin, an elder in the church at Los Gatos, sends these words of per- 
sonal tribute : " Laid aside from the active duties of the ministry for the last thir- 
teen years, Mr. Temple has made his life useful by teaching. As a citizen and 
patriot he was always interested in affairs of government and faithful in dis- 
charging his duties as an elector. Affable and courteous in social life, his 
conversation always showed a wide range of study and observation. He took 
a deep interest in all our church work, extending to every new pastor, as he 
came to labor among us, a whole-hearted loyalty and support, and to the 
younger ministers was as a spiritual father. Mr. Temple was a man of faith 
and prayer, and held in great reverence the sacred Scriptures. He believed 
with all his heart in the power of the gospel to regenerate and save sinful 
man. His life and labors in our midst have been helpful to the cause of 
Christianity, and his memory is precious to the entire church and community 
of Los Gatos, where his well-rounded earthly life was closed." 

Mr. Temple was married, September 3, 1849, to Louisa Maria Newlin, of 
Fishkill, N. Y., daughter of Isaac Newlin and Mary North. She died March 
I, 1865. He married, second, October 8, 1872, Mary Hubbard Turrill, of Os- 
wego, N. Y., daughter of Hon. Joel Turrill and Mary Sullivan Hubbard. He 
had two sons, business men in Mexico, and a daughter, who graduated the 
present season from Leland Stanford Junior University. 

Mr. Temple died of heart disease, at Los Gatos, Cal., September 9, 1897, 
aged seventy-four years, nine months, and twenty-seven days. 



GLASS OF 1849. 

George Alvan Howard, D.D. 

Son of Joseph Howard (a merchant in New York City) and Anstiss 
Smith; born in Salem, Mass., January 22, 1816; fitted for college at Eames 
and Putnam's School, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; entered the University of the City of 
New York in 1835 and remained until the junior year ; studied in Yale Divinity 
School, 1846-48, and graduated from this Seminary in 1849; was licensed to 



296 

preach by the New Haven (Conn.) East Association, August I, 1848. He was 
ordained pastor of the Presbyterian church at Catskill, N. Y., by the Pres- 
bytery of Columbia, July 17, 1850, and continued in that one charge forty 
years; from 1890 was pastor emeritus, still residing in Catskill. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton College in 
1870. He published several discourses of local value, in earlier years prepared 
book reviews for the Christian Union, and also contributed frequently to the 
New York Evangelist and the New York Times. 

Rev. Christopher G. Hazard, his pastoral successor, sends this tribute : 
" His preaching increasingly concerned itself with Christ and centered itself 
upon Him. Always disinclined to abstract and controversial discussion, he 
yielded more and more to the idea that true knowledge is essentially concerned 
with personality and character. Continuing to the close of his long life and 
ministry the clearness, acuteness and vigorous power of his mind, he constantly 
increased in those rich qualities of style and feeling which are marks of ripe- 
ness. More and more chastened and subdued in thought, he never lost in 
force, in the charm of variety, in the purity of purpose. To the grace which 
was given to him as a minister of truth were added the attraction and power of 
a most genial and generous social nature, and the fruitful history of his nearly 
fifty years of labor in a single field is the natural result of the union of those 
elements. The preacher and the pastor were happily combined in him, and the 
vast assembly of ' all sorts and conditions of men ' that gathered at last about 
his coffin was a touching and mighty tribute to the wideness of his sympathies, 
the largeness of his sphere, the true greatness of his character, and the extent 
of his influence and service. Even in the closing weeks of his life he was 
abundant in labors, and he was suddenly called out of ministry into rest, and 
unto reward in the midst of life that refused to submit to time, and to which it 
was difficult to attach the thought of age." 

A memorial notice in the Catskill Recorder, presumably from the same 
pen, closes : " On the day which was to be his last he busied himself as usual 
among the flowers of his beloved garden. During the past month his activity 
had been wonderful. He preached in Christ's Church, spoke to the members 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, presented the flag to the 16th 
Separate Company, delivered his address on Alexander before the Coxsackie 
University Extension Center, and gave his charming talk on Venice to the 
Catskill branch of the same society. His illness was of but a few hours' dura- 
tion. For him his eighty-two years had been a preparation. He knew nothing 
of wasting decline, and little of suffering. 'God's finger touched him and 
he slept.' " 

Dr. Howard was married, June 4, 1851, to Mary Elizabeth Spencer, of 
Utica, N. Y., daughter of Judge Joshua Austin Spencer, LL.D., and Electa 
Dean. She survives him. 

He died of angina pectoris, at Catskill, N. Y., May 12, 1898, aged eighty- 
two years, three months, and twenty days. 



297 

William Gardner Tuttle. 

Son of Dea. Thomas Sparhawk Tuttle and Sarah Butterfield ; born in 
Littleton, Mass., September 25, 1819; prepared for college at Groto'n (Mass.) 
Academy and Phillips Academy, Andover; graduated at Amherst College, 
1846; took the full course in this Seminary, 1846-49; licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. John L. Taylor at Andover, April 17, 
1849. After a few months of home missionary service in eastern Maine, and of 
preaching in his native town, he was ordained as pastor at Harrisville, N. H. 
April 16, 1851, remaining there until i860; was pastor of the First Church, 
Ware, Mass., 1861-87 ; afterward resided at Worcester, Mass., until his death, 
supplying the church at Holden, Mass., in 1888, the Lakeview Church, Worces- 
ter, in 1889, and frequently preaching in other churches. 

Rev. George E. Fisher, of North Amherst, Mass., sends this tribute to his 
classmate: "Mr. Tuttle was my classmate four years at Amherst and three 
years at Andover, and was one whom I confided in most fully and loved most 
truly. I was on terms of special intimacy with him during all those years, and 
indeed always afterward to the day of his death. He was a good scholar, a 
good preacher, a good pastor, and a good man. His Christian and ministerial 
life was a sincere, earnest, consistent, and useful one. He possessed a fund of 
good humor and greatly enjoyed an exchange of ' sharp shots ' with his friends. 
Pure in mind, in heart, and speech, his spirit was sweet and gentle and loving 
from first to last. We who knew him best respected and loved him most in life, 
and lamented him most in death. He was so much like Christ, we are sure he 
has gone to be with, and still more like, the Lord whom he loved and served." 

Mr. Tuttle was married, July 31, 1850, to Harriet Elizabeth Wallace, of 
Milford, N. H., daughter of Royal Wallace and Hannah French, who sur- 
vives him. A son, Amherst, 1885, is a physician in New York City, and a 
daughter was for ten years instructor in Wellesley College; one son is 
deceased. 

Mr. Tuttle died of degeneration of the brain, at Worcester, Mass., August 
5, 1897, aged seventy-seven years, ten months, and eleven days. 



Joseph Franklin Griggs. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Lieut. John Griggs and Mary Campbell Thurston; born in Sutton, 
Mass., April 24, 1822 ; prepared for college at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbra- 
ham, and Leicester Academy; graduated at Yale College, 1846; in this 
Seminary, part of the junior year, 1846-47 ; taught select schools in Sutton 
and Holden, Mass., 1847-48, and in the " Men's Winter School," Worcester, 
Mass., 1848-49; conducted a classical school for boys in Alleghany and Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., from 1849 to l8 55> when [t was mer g ed in the Western University of 
Pennsylvania; was professor of Ancient Languages in the University until 
1864; then professor of Greek Language and Literature until 1880; afterwards 
secretary and treasurer of the Board of Trustees until disabled by sickness 
in 1892 — a service in all of thirty-seven years. He continued to reside in 
Pittsburgh until his death. 

Rev. Prof. Matthew B. Riddle, D.D., LL.D., of the Western Theological 
Seminary, in his address at the funeral of Professor Griggs, said: " He was the 



298 

connecting link between the University which had suspended and the University 
which was revived in 1855. He stood in a gap at the time when everything 
seemed to be against anything like proper educational facilities in this region. 
He faithfully did his duty all those long years. The significance of a life like 
that is rarely understood. If a teacher can make a speech, if he can write a 
book, if he can engage in something else more attractive to the public eye, then 
he can be tolerated ; but the patient hours of labor, requiring fortitude and 
endurance beyond almost any other form of service, this is rarely appreciated. 
As a fellow-teacher I owe it to the memory of Professor Griggs to make this 
public testimony to his faithfulness in this arduous service." Rev. Edward P. 
Cowan, D.D., ex-pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, of 
which Professor Griggs had been for thirty-five years an elder, said : " When I 
received an invitation to become the pastor of this church I received a kindly 
note from Dr. John DeWitt, mentioning some pleasant features in connection 
with the church, and among other things he said : ' You will find one man in 
the session that will remind you of the beloved disciple.' He named the man, 
but if he had not named him I would have picked him out; it was Professor 
Griggs. He once contemplated entering the Christian ministry, but was turned 
aside from it on account of his health. If he had entered the ministry he 
would have preached the gospel of St. John. He did proclaim this gospel; he 
preached to all who came into contact with him ; his influence as a member 
of the community and as a teacher in the class-room always commended the 
gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ." 

Professor Griggs was married, April 16, 1863, to Eliza Buchanan Brooks, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., daughter of Dr. Jeremiah Brooks and Martha Clarke 
Buchanan, who survives him. They had two daughters and three sons, one of 
the daughters dying in infancy; one son, a graduate of the Western University 
of Pennsylvania and in medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, is a physi- 
cian, another a bank officer, and the third general secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
of Pittsburgh. 

Professor Griggs died as a result of apoplexy, at Pittsburgh, Pa., April 1, 
I §97> a g e d seventy-four years, eleven months, and eight days. 

GLASS OF 1850. 

John Riddle Upton. 

Son of Dea. John Upton and Betsey Riddle; born in Wilmot, N. H., 
October 4, 1819; prepared for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, 
N. H. ; graduated at Amherst College, 1847 5 took the full course in this 
Seminary, 1847-50; licensed by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. 
William T. Briggs, at North Andover, April 16, 1850. After a few months of 
home missionary service in Alexander and Cooper, in Maine, he was ordained 
at Wiimot, N. H., April 23, 1851, and went to Iowa, laboring in Dubuque 
County, 1851-53; at Inland, Buckingham and Monona, 1853-55; resided at 
Moretown, Vt., occasionally preaching, 1855-57; acting pastor, Buckingham, Io., 
I %S7S9 5 at Monona, Io., 1860-69 ; in home missionary service at Lakeville, 
Io., 1869-80; without charge, Spirit Lake, Io., 1880-83; Sibley, Io., 1883-88 
(except one year, when he conducted the Alton Review, at Alton, Io.) ; Platte- 
ville, 111., 1888-89; Pekin, 111., 1889-90; removing, after death of his last 



299 

surviving daughter, to Escondido, Cal., where he was kindly cared for by 
Christian friends. 

A notice in the Advance says that " he was of much value on the frontier 
as a public-spirited citizen and educator as well as a Christian minister." A 
gentleman in Iowa, who knew him well, writes : " Mr. Upton was a great reader 
and student all his life. He took a rare delight in nature and the natural sci- 
ences. While in California, 1890-98, he engaged in fruit culture and the study 
of botany. Mr. and Mrs. Upton brought up and helped educate an adopted 
boy, while in their frontier mission home at Lakeville, Io. The young man 
went West, located in Wyoming, and became mayor of his city, State senator, 
and member of Congress." 

Mr. Upton was married, October n, 1852, to Mary Bass, a teacher in 
St. Paul, Minn., daughter of Judge Adolphus Bass and Sally Copeland of 
Moretown, Vt. She died February 5, 1883. Of three daughters, one died in 
childhood, the others after reaching mature life. 

He died of hemorrhage of lungs, following grip, in Escondido, Cal., April 
4, 1898, aged seventy-eight years and six months. 



CLASS OP 1851. 

Justin Edwards Burbank. 

Son of Dea. Samuel Burbank and Mary Lawrence ; born in Washington, 
N. H., March 18, 1825; prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1848; took the full course in this Seminary; 
was licensed by the Suffolk South Association, at the room of the Massachu- 
setts Home Missionary Soicety, in Cornhill, Boston, April 1, 1851; returned 
to Andover for further study as resident licentiate, 1851-52. After brief periods 
of service in teaching and preaching, in different places at the East, he was 
commissioned in 1857 by the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society as home 
missionary in Minnesota, and was acting pastor at Carimona and Preston until 
1862, having been ordained at the former place April 13, 1858. He occasion- 
ally also supplied at Union (now Bristol), 1859-60. From 1861 to 1865 he was 
editor of the Preston Reptiblican. Remaining in Preston for some time without 
charge, he was acting pastor at Mazeppa, Minn., 1868, and at Quincy, Minn., 
1869-70. Returning to New England, he was acting pastor of the church in 
Nelson, N. H., 1871-72. He subsequently resided in Hartford, Conn., for some 
years, and also in Concord, N. H. In Hartford he was editorially connected with 
the Religious Herald, and in Concord for some time with the Standard. In the 
early part of 1895 he removed to Washington, N. H., his native town, and 
there resided until his death, a part of the time on his native homestead, which 
he had purchased. He was never married, and left his property, amounting to 
about eight hundred dollars, in trust for the benefit of the Congregational 
church in Washington. 

Rev. William H. Dowden (Class of 1866), the pastor at Washington at the 
time of Mr. Burbank's death, writes : " He lived there as a recluse. He was 
respected by those who knew him for his real excellence and for his good qual- 
ities of mind and heart. His intelligence was the result of much reading ; his 
scholarly attainments were above the average; his clearness of thought and 
readiness of expression always rendered what he said interesting." Mr. W. A. 



300 

Hotchkiss, his editorial successor in Preston, Minn., writes of him: "He was 
much respected here. He never said much about himself, but was always a 
Christian gentleman. His integrity was never questioned. He was often 
called 'the walking dictionary.' " The compilers of the history of Washing- 
ton express their indebtedness to him for his valuable assistance in historical 
researches. 

Mr. Burbank died of heart disease, at Washington, N. H., November 4, 
1897, aged seventy- two years, seven months, and seventeen days. 

CLASS OF 1853. 

William Augustus McCorkle, D.D. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of James McCorkle and Elizabeth Hanna; born in Troy, O., Novem- 
ber 2, 1822 ; graduated at Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind., 1850, having 
pursued his preparatory studies under the instruction of college professors 
there; studied in this Seminary, 1850-51, and in Lane Seminary, 1851-53. He 
was ordained by the Crawfordsville Presbytery, June 19, 1853, and was home 
missionary pastor at Attica, Ind., 1853-54 ; agent of the American Tract Soci- 
ety, 1854-55, residing at Thorntown, Ind. ; home missionary pastor, Superior, 
Wis., 1856-58; pastor, Marshall, Mich., 1858-63; without charge, in impaired 
health, at Detroit, Mich., 1863-64; at Cleveland, O., 1864-65 ; became assistant 
pastor to Rev. George Duffield, D.D., of the First Presbyterian Church, 
Detroit, in 1865, and on his death in 1868 succeeded him as pastor, remaining 
until 1871 ; pastor Third Presbyterian Church, Boston, 1871-73; of Second 
Presbyterian Church, Princeton, N. J., 1874-77; of church at Lake Forest, 111., 
1877 ; of Reformed Church, Nyack, N. Y., 1878-81 ; pastor First Presbyterian 
Church, Ypsilanti, Mich., 1881-89; afterwards without charge, although often 
supplying vacant churches at Detroit until his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Wabash College in 
187 1. He was one of the founders of Alma College in Michigan, and a trustee 
of the same until his death. During his residence in Detroit he was the stated 
clerk of Detroit Presbytery, and was the moderator of the Synod of Michigan 
in 1866. 

From a sketch in the Michigan Presbyterian is taken the following : "In a 
marked degree Dr. McCorkle possessed the combined qualities of mind and 
heart which constitute a successful minister of Jesus Christ. To natural gifts 
of a high order he united the graces of the Spirit which give efficiency to 
the ambassador of the cross. Impressive in appearance, gracious in manner, 
positive in conviction, felicitous in utterance, he was a preacher who needed 
not to be ashamed, rightly divining the word of truth. Ripe in scholarship, a 
diligent student of the Word, a discriminating exegete, he continually brought 
forth things new and old from the storehouse of Holy Scripture." 

Dr. McCorkle was married, September 9, 1852, to Cordelia Maria Foster, 
of Adrian, Mich., daughter of William Foster and Phoebe Mann, who survives 
him. Two sons were graduates of Princeton College and became lawyers in 
Michigan, one of them dying the present year; two other sons died in infancy, 
and two daughters are living. 

Dr. McCorkle died of chronic inflammation of the bladder, at Detroit, 
Mich., April 16, 1896, aged seventy-three years, five months, and fourteen days. 



30i 

Charles Strong Smith. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dr. Aaron Smith and Amelia Strong; born in Hardwick, Vt., July 
24, 1824; prepared for college at Peacham (Vt.) Academy; graduated at the 
University of Vermont, 1848; was principal of Craftsbury (Vt.) Academy, 
1848-49; studied in this Seminary, 1850-51, and graduated at the Theological 
Institute of Connecticut, East Windsor, 1853 ; was licensed to preach by the 
Hampshire East Association, at Enfield, Mass., May 11, 1852. He preached at 
New Preston, Conn., 1853-55; wa s ordained as evangelist at Franklin, N. Y., 
November 13, 1855, and was acting pastor at North Walton (New Road), N. Y., 
l8 55-57- His health failing, he took a sea voyage to Labrador and on return 
taught and preached for a time in Waitsfield, Vt., 1857-58, and supplied the 
pulpit in his native town for a part of 1858. He was without charge five years, 
1858-63, and from 1863 to 1888, twenty-five years, was secretary of the Vermont 
Domestic Missionary Society at Montpelier, where he continued afterward to 
reside. 

Mr. Smith represented his native town in the Vermont Legislature in 1863. 
He was associate editor, with Rev. William H. Lord, D.D. (Class of 1846), of 
the Vermont Chronicle, 1875-77, and editor of the same from 1885 till its re- 
moval to St. Johnsbury in 1895, continuing afterward to furnish much editorial 
matter and the Sunday school lesson notes until his last illness. His only other 
publication was an Essay on Systematic Beneficence. In 1876 Middlebury Col- 
lege conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, which he declined. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, of St. Johnsbury (Class of 1870), his successor in 
office, sends the following tribute : " It was my fortune to succeed Mr. Smith 
in the office which he had held for twenty-five years, and to be brought into 
close personal relations with him in both missionary and editorial work up to 
the time of his last illness. His work and his character could stand the test of 
most careful scrutiny. As secretary of missions he was careful, patient, wise, 
and hopeful. As a counsellor, both for ministers and for churches, his judg- 
ment was rarely at fault. He had a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
our Congregational polity, and never failed to raise his voice in warning when 
there was danger of the slightest departure from them. Upon occasion he 
could stand with a minority, and wait for time and event to vindicate his posi- 
tion. His convictions were slowly and deliberately formed, but when reached 
remained unshaken. He was independent in thought and decision ; and yet 
no man could work more readily and harmoniously with others, even if need 
be in carrying out plans that did not fully meet his approval. To a surprising 
degree he won the confidence of the churches. New pastors coming to the 
State and hearing him address their people, with his weak voice and quiet 
manner, could not understand the hearty response made to his appeals. As an 
editor Mr. Smith had a singularly pure and correct style and on occasion was 
not wanting in keen wit, but maintained a high spiritual tone both in his writings 
and selections. It was in the quality of his Christly character that Mr. Smith 
will be longest remembered and his influence most deeply felt. He was a good 
man. He showed an unfailing spirit of sweetness and generosity that could 
meet the severest tests. It was wholly characteristic of him to decline an 
honorary title given him by one of the colleges in the State, in such a manner 
that in later years only personal friends knew that it had ever been granted. 



302 

He left to his family and to the churches he had served the legacy of a good 
name, and the memory of a man who had 'walked with God.'" 

Mr. Smith was married, July 24, 1854, to Lucy Ann Maynard, of Walton, 
X. V., daughter of Levi Maynard and Anna Day. She died February 2, 1857. 
He married, second, December 8, 1869, Sarah Jane Landfear, of New Haven, 
Conn., daughter of Dea. Harry L. Landfear and Sarah Talcott, who survives 
him. He had four daughters and one son; one of the daughters died in 
infancy and another while a student at Mt. Holyoke Seminary ; the son is the 
chemist of the city of Worcester. 

Mr. Smith died of a complication of troubles, following the grip, at Mont- 
pelier, Vt.. January 11, 189S, aged seventy-three years, five months, and eighteen 
days. 

Stephen Rollins Dennen, D.D. (Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Stephen Rollins Dennen and Ruth Winslow Hall ; born in Poland, 
Me.. November 6, 1S26; prepared for college at Hebron (Me.) Academy; 
graduated at Waterville College, now Colby University, 1849; t°°k the full 
course in Bangor Seminary, 1S49-52 ; licensed to preach by the Penobscot 
Association, December, 1S51 ; studied in this Seminary 7 as resident licentiate, 
1S52-53. He was ordained over the Phillips Church, Watertown, Mass., July 
11, 1S55, and remained until 1S62. He supplied the Winthrop Church, Charles- 
town, Mass., during the absence of the pastor, Rev. Abbott E. Kittredge (Class 
of 1S59), in Europe. He was then without charge, residing at Watertown and 
Somerville, until his installation over High Street Church, Providence, R. I., 
March 1, 1865, remaining until 1868; was pastor of the First Church, Woburn, 
Mass., 1S6S-71 ; of the First Church, Lynn, Mass., 1872-75; of the Third 
Church, New Haven, Conn., 1875-84. Residing without charge, but frequently 
supplying vacant pulpits, in Concord, Mass., 1884-87, and in West Newton, 
Mass., 18SS-93, ne removed to the Pacific Coast; supplied in 1894 the Con- 
gregational Church in East Los Angeles, Cal., for six months, and the First 
Presbyterian Church in San Diego, Cal., for three months ; afterwards preached 
in Pasadena and elsewhere; was pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Long 
Beach, Cal., from 1S96 to the time of his death. 

Mr. Dennen received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Iowa College 
in 1S74. The following is taken from a memorial notice in the (San Francisco) 
Occident: " His influence has been wide in the community of Long Beach and 
the surrounding country, and productive of lasting good. His loss is deeply 
mourned, and his memory held in tender reverence. On the day of his funeral 
the schools and stores of Long Beach were closed, and many brother clergymen 
joined with his own people in the services which marked the close of his long 
and abundantly useful life. Dr. Dennen's sermons were earnest and powerful 
in proclaiming the way of salvation, carrying conviction by their pronounced 
sincerity and force, brilliant and exceedingly attractive. They were full of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ and preached with charming simplicity and convincing 
peruasiveness. His hearers went away delighted and instructed, better men 
and women, nerved to a higher life, and led to follow it." 

Dr. Dennen was married, November 2, 1854, to Clara Whitney Ludwig, 
of Thomaston, Me., daughter of Dr. William Ludwig and Lucy Whitney, of 



303 

Waldoboro, Me. She survives him, with three daughters, two of them at the 
head of the Girls' Collegiate School in Los Angeles, the other connected with 
the public library in the same city. Four children are deceased. 

Dr. Dennen died of paralysis of the heart, at Long Beach, Cal., January 
18, 189S, aged seventy-one years, two months, and twelve days. 



CLASS OP 1854. 

James McLaren Breed Dwight. 

Son of James Dwight and Susan Breed, being a brother of President 
Dwight of Yale University, and a grandson of the elder President Dwight; 
born in Norwich, Conn., August 11, 1825; prepared for college at Norwich 
Academy; graduated at Yale College, 1846; instructor in Brainerd Academy, 
Haddam, Conn., 1846-47; tutor in Latin at Yale College, 1849-53; attended 
lectures in Yale Divinity School, 1549-52, and in this Seminary, 1853-54, having 
as his graduating theme The Art- Future of Puritanism ; continued theological 
study as resident licentiate, at Andover, 1854-55, and at New Haven, 1855-58. 
He was licensed to preach by the New Haven East Association, but was never 
ordained. Turning his attention to legal study he graduated from the Law 
Department of Columbia College, 1861, and practiced law in New York City, 
rS6i-69, serving also for several years as assistant instructor in Municipal Law 
at Columbia College, under personal appointment of his cousin, Prof. Theodore 
W. Dwight, LL. D. From 1869 he resided in New Haven, except when travel- 
ing abroad, until his death. 

Rev. Prof. George P. Fisher, D. D., LL. D. (Class of 1851), wrote of Mr. 
Dwight, in an article in the New Haven Journal and Courier: "His interest 
was keen in whatever was of historic significance and value in connection with 
New Haven, and in whatever has to do with its beauty and attractiveness as a 
place of residence. For the existence of East Rock Park the city is largely 
indebted to Mr. Dwight. Decided in his opinions, and not lacking courage and 
independence in the avowal of them, he was equally characterized by good 
temper and an unvarying courtesy. A Christian gentleman of uncommon 
intelligence, a public- spirited citizen, and a faithful friend, has gone from 
among us." 

From a tribute to Mr. Dwight, read before a University club, of which he 
was a member, by Rev. Prof. James M. Hoppin, D.D., of New Haven (Class 
of 1845), the following extracts are made : " Mr. Dwight, we all would say, was 
a person of uncommon intellectual activity. He fed his mind on new ideas. 
He was a man of universal knowledge, or possessed of an intellectual hunger 
to know everything that is worth knowing ; and this was for the pure sake of 
knowledge rather than for the display or reputation of it. He lived at home 
with his books, not a life of literary epicureanism, but of worthy ambition to 
delve into every source of information, to compass the whole round of knowl- 
edge, and also, I think, of a desire to possess the power of informing others, 
of imparting to other minds the knowledge he had gained for himself ; and in 
this he showed true humility, for he did not seem to think of himself at all 
when he poured out a wealth of knowledge won through careful study and 
thought. ... His imagination constituted a large ingredient of his nature, and 



304 

entered into all he was and did; more so, I think, than his friends supposed or 
gave him credit for. The only poem that he published was ' The Vigil,' which 
was printed for private circulation, and which runs in the currents of religious 
thought and ritual shaped by the service of the English Church, with whose 
spirit he was entirely familiar. This poem was received in England with high 
approbation, and also by American Churchmen. . . . He was not only a reli- 
gious man, but he was a believer after the pattern of St. John and St. Paul. 
There are religious men who are, as we say, ' sound in the faith,' and whose 
theology is wrought like serried links of steel armor, hung up in academic hall, 
yet who have not, within this steel panoply, the living man, the spirit and life of 
love which make one capable of prayer, praise, and devotion. . . . We all, I 
think, who were present at his funeral, when our friend, or what was mortal of 
him, lay stretched on his bier, the choir standing by his side and singing his own 
Hymn to the Cross, thought that there lay one who was a holy man, whose 
spirit had ascended to the holy abode of God." 

Mr. Dwight was married, June 6, 1866, to Cora Charlesina Tallmadge, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., daughter of Maj. Charles B. Tallmadge, U. S. A., and Mar- 
garet Kennedy, who survives him. One son died in infancy. 

Mr. Dwight died at New Haven, Conn., of a shock to his system, resulting 
from a fall in his room, by which his thigh was broken, June 28, 1897, aged 
seventy- one years, ten months, and seventeen days. 



CLASS OF 1855. 

Elijah Howe, Jr. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Elijah Howe and Prudence Clarke; born in Dedham, Mass., 
September 27, 1828; fitted for college in Dedham, under the classical teacher 
supported by Rev. Ebenezer Burgess, D. D. (Class of 181 5), and at Phillips 
Academy, Andover; graduated at Amherst College, 1849; instructor in high 
school, South Hadley, Mass., 1849-50, and in high school at East Douglas, 
Mass., 1850-52; studied in the junior class of this Seminary, 1852-53. Feel- 
ing that his health was not sufficient for the ministerial profession, he left the 
Seminary, and after teaching one year, 1853-54, in the Academy at South 
Wilbraham, Mass., he entered business life; was bookkeeper in the Shoe and 
Leather Bank, Boston, 1854-64; New England agent of the Black Diamond 
Steel Works, Pittsburg, Pa., 1864-76; secretary of Norfolk Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, and of the Dedham Mutual Fire Insurance Company, from 
1880 until his death, and treasurer of the first named company from 1885. He 
had also been for twenty-one years a trustee of the Dedham Institution for 
Savings. 

Rev. J. B. Seabury of Dedham, Mr. Howe's pastor (Class of 1874), in an 
obituary notice published in the Dedham Transcript, wrote the following: 
"Mr. Howe's long residence in this town had made him one of her best known 
citizens. His familiar face ©n the street will be missed by young and old 
alike. He was a man of simple tastes, of unostentatious habits, of conserva- 
tive temper. He hated sham and pretense. He loved peace; controversy was 
uncongenial to him. He was a man of scrupulous integrity, of clean-cut and 



305 

independent personality. His opinions were his own, born of his own quick 
decisive thinking, expressed in concise and transparent language. As a man 
of business he was exact, thorough, laborious. His fidelity to trusts imposed 
upon him was absorbing. For forty years Mr. Howe was an active member of 
the First Congregational Church; its treasurer, clerk, a Sabbath school teacher, 
and a deacon. He was for a number of years moderator of the Allin Evangel- 
ical Society connected with that church. He was one of its financial supporters, 
a brother honored and beloved, a counsellor. His ready wit and genial spirit 
made him many friends. His keen, quick insight made him an invaluable 
member of the corporation with which he was connected. His convictions were 
deep and stable, commanding attention and respect." 

Mr. Howe was married, January 4, 1857, to Julia Ann Hunt, of East Doug- 
las, Mass., daughter of Oliver Hunt and Persis Gibson Forbush. She survives 
him, with two sons; one is a graduate of Harvard Medical School, and physi- 
cian at Cohasset, Mass., and the other, who is a graduate of Amherst College, 
1894, and of Harvard Medical College, 1898, is resident at the Children's 
Hospital in Boston. Another son died in infancy. 

Mr. Howe died of heart disease, at Uedham, Mass., May 7, 1898, aged 
sixty- nine years, seven months, and ten days. 



GLASS OF 1855. 

Jacob Ide. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Rev. Jacob Ide, U.D. (Class of 1812), and Mary Emmons; born in 
We<t Medway, Mass., August 7, 1823; prepared for college at Leicester (Mass.) 
Academy; graduated at Amherst College, 1848; studied law with his uncle, 
Judge Williams Emmons, at Hallowell, Me., nearly two years; instructor in 
Lexington (Mass.) Academy ; in Mr. Baker's Chapman Hall School, Boston 
and (1852-54) in Leicester Academy. Having in the meantime studied theology 
with his father, and been licensed to preach by the Mendon Association, meet- 
ing at Mendon, Mass., October 11, 1854, he attended lectures in this Seminary, 
as resident licentiate, 1854-55. He was ordained as pastor of the church at 
Mansfield, Mass., March 15, 1856, and remained there until his death. 

Although Mr. Ide began the study of law and afterwards was engaged in 
teaching, his hereditary antecedents were such that it was improbable and 
improper that he should ever be other than a minister of the gospel. His 
father, Dr. Jacob Ide, and his grandfather, Dr. Nathaniel Emmons, were each 
preachers and teachers of theology in their respective country parishes for 
over fifty years (each of them dying among his own people at the age of ninety- 
five), and was the descendant in the two previous generations of Rev. Chester 
Williams, of Hadley, and Rev. Ebenezer Williams, of Pomfret, Conn. ; his 
brother was a minister and his sister was the wife of Rev. Charles T. Torrey, 
the anti-slavery martyr, so that he was reared in the midst of marked moral and 
ministerial surroundings. His own continuous service of forty- two years in a 
country town, exercising the continuous and accumulating influence of the 
preacher, the pastor, the promoter of education, of temperance, of patriotism, 
and of all good things, repeated in a manner notable for this generation the 



306 

olden type of the New England minister. Although there were other churches 
than his, he still seemed in a certain measure to belong to the whole town ; he 
was in earlier years one of the school committee ; he was instrumental in the 
founding of the public library and the building of the town hall ; was president 
of the library Board of Trustees and delivered the address at the dedication of 
the hall. Every year he preached a sermon in memory of the soldiers of the 
town, and more than once delivered the oration on Memorial Day. He repre- 
sented the town in the Legislature in 1864, and was a member of the State 
Senate in 1S66. He was one of the trustees of Wheaton Seminary at Norton 
and gave the historical address on its anniversary in 1885. 

Rev. H. J. Patrick, D.D., of Newton (Class of 1853), wno was a college 
classmate, made remarks at the funeral of Mr. Ide, from which the following is 
taken: "This man, now silent, whose voice has been heard in this temple of 
God for above forty years, is no more. Though dead, he yet speaketh. We 
bow before the mystery which we cannot understand. One thing we can under- 
stand — forty- two years of loyal, faithful service here cannot be torn from our 
hearts. His work has been well done. I wonder how you can get along with- 
out Mr. Ide. Mansfield will not for years grow beyond the influence he has 
wrought and the impress he has made. We cannot sum up the importance and 
the beneficence of his life among this people." 

Rev. E. O. Jameson (Class of 185S), for many years pastor in East Medway 
(now Millis), sends this tribute: "Rev. Jacob Ide, whose sudden death is so 
widely and deeply lamented, was a man of rare ability, scholarship, and piety. 
A personal acquaintance of more than twenty-five years exalted him in my 
respect and gave him a warm place in my heart. He was a man of poetic 
temperament, scholarly tastes, ready wit, eloquent speech, and tender, sympa- 
thetic feelings. There met in him the elements of a grand preacher and 
an excellent pastor. He was faithful, self-sacrificing, loving and beloved. 
Although small in stature he was a man of commanding presence, influence, and 
power. His monument of remembrance is in the hearts of the old and young 
of his parish and of the surrounding churches. It is impossible to estimate in 
words such a man, such a minister, such a citizen, and such a friend. He did a 
great work and did it well. His memory is blessed." 

Mr. Ide was married, March 24, 1859, to Ellen Maria Rogers, of Mansfield, 
daughter of Hon. John Rogers and Eliza Williams. She died February 24, 
1S91. One son survives him, a graduate of the Boston University Law School. 

Mr. Ide died in Mansfield, Mass., March 23, 1898, aged seventy-four years, 
seven months, and sixteen days. 



GLASS OF 1856. 

Oscar Blakeslee Hitchcock. 

Son of Sylvester Hitchcock and Lorinda Blakeslee; born in Windham 
("North Settlement," now Ashland), N. Y., May 24, 1828; prepared for 
college at Delhi (N. Y.) Academy, the Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Mass., 
and Amenia [a. Y.) Seminary; entered Union College in 1850 and graduated 
in 1852 ; studied in Yale Divinity School, 1852-53 and 1854-55, spending the 
intervening year at Poughkeepsie Law School ; graduated from this Seminary, 



307 

1856. and continued study here as resident licentiate, 1856-57, having been 
licen-ed by the Essex South Association, at Salem, Mass., January 6. 1857. 
~o attended theological lectures for a short time at Union and Princeton 
Seminaries. He preached in the winter of 1859-60 at Owasco Lake and Whit- 
V., malarial trouble closing his work there. From 1862 to 1865 
he was in the hospital service, of which he wrote in connection with his report 
for the last General Catalogue: " Was acting chaplain of Camp Barry, 1863; 
in the campaign of 1864 attended the sick and wounded in hospital at Wash- 
ington and on the transports sailing up and down the Potomac In 1865 I was 
in the same service in the Department of the South at Port Royal, subsequently 
at Savannah and Charleston, and was the bearer of supplies to the last detach- 
ment of Andersonville prisoners set adrift by the rebels back of Jacksonville, 
Florida. I went to St. Augustine and remained there until the hospital was 
closed and the sick and wounded removed to Hilton Head. I was at Hilton 
Head when Jefferson Davis was made prisoner, and saw him transferred to the 
ship that took him to Fort Monroe." 

After the war he resided at Windham, having charge of his father's estate 
and of his invalid mother until her death in 1885, without pastoral charge, but 
occasionally preaching and lecturing. He made repeated and extensive jour- 
n Europe, contributing accounts of them to local journals. He spent the 
last years of his life in Ithaca, N. Y. Going to a Shelter Island hotel for the 
benefit of the sea air, he was stricken with paralysis, taken to a hospital, and 
there died. 

Rev. C. C. Thorne, of Windham, X. Y., writes of him: "His sermons 
were highly prized for their rich imagery, beauty and elegance of expression, 
and power. His addresses during the war were potent agents in molding 
public sentiment in favor of the Union cause. As a writer he excelled in 
poetrv as well as in prose. His last production was a poem of three ve 
obscurely written on a slip of paper which was found on his person after his 
death. The closing verse seems to indicate that he knew his end was near : 

" ■ The hoars of childhood and of play 
Come as in rison back to me ; 
A Tision dim and far away, 
Like an island in the sea.' " 

Having no family, he left a legacy of $500 to the church in his native town, 
and the residue, about £30,000, together with his library, to his "dear aima 
mater." Union College. 

He died at Shelter Island, N. Y., of paralysis, July 7, 1897, aged sixty-nine 
one month, and thirteen 



CLASS OF 1857. 

Charles Cotton Salter. (Nan- graduate.) 

Son of Dea. Cleveland Jarman Salter and Eliza Watson Cotton; born in 

Haven, Conn., February 19, 1832; the family removing in his boyhood to 

Waver... m., he fitted for college at Waverly Seminary and at W yman s 

School.St Louis, Mo., in which he was teacher of classics, 1852-54; entered 



308 

Yale College in the sophomore class and graduated, 1852; took his junior 
year in this Seminary, 1854-55; graduated at Yale Divinity School, 1855, having 
been also tutor in Yale College, 1856-57 ; licensed by the New Haven East 
Association, meeting with Prof. Chauncey A. Goodrich, D.D., May 27, 1856; 
resident licentiate at Andover, 1857-58. He was ordained over the church in 
Kewanee, 111., April 20, 1859, and remained until his health broke down in 
1861 ; was chaplain of 13th Connecticut Volunteers, at Ship Island and New 
Orleans, in 1862, but lung trouble compelled him to come North ; became the 
first settled pastor of Plymouth Church, Minneapolis, Minn., where he remained 
until 1869, starting the enterprises out of which grew the Park Avenue and 
Pilgrim Churches; acting pastor at Brookfield, Mo., 1869-71; organized the 
Pilgrim Church, Duluth, Minn., and its pastor, 1871-76; acting pastor of First 
Church, Denver, Col., 1877-79; preached in the church of his boyhood, 
Waverly, 111., 1880-81, and in his former charge at Duluth, 1881-82; was in 
Europe, 1882-84, and pastor of the American Church in Florence during the 
winter of 1882-83; in Brooklyn, N. Y., and other places, without charge; 
preached for a few months, 1885, at Tampa, Fla. ; removed to Duluth, Minn., 
in June, 1887, and was pastor of the Bethel Church there until his death. 

The life work of Mr. Salter was remarkable in two ways : his pastorates 
were all brief, being constantly interrupted by ill health, so that he was obliged 
to take long seasons of rest. Yet always and everywhere he won the hearts of 
men and wielded influence over them by the simple power of earnest, hearty love. 
In those last ten years of his life at Duluth, doing voluntary but arduous work, 
as unsalaried pastor of the Bethel, as chaplain of the Grand Army of the State, 
as minister of everybody that had no other minister, he gained the grateful 
affection of a whole city. The day of his funeral is said to have been one of 
" almost universal mourning in Duluth for its most unpretentious, but best and 
most beloved citizen." Mr. James W. Osborne, a lawyer residing in a neigh- 
boring city, a former student in Phillips Academy, writes to one of the Seminary 
professors, "to tell of the life and death of one of the very best and grandest 
men that ever went from Andover. When I first went to Andover I went to a 
farmhouse, with another student, one afternoon to do some work, and the lady 
of the house, when she knew that I was from the West, wanted to know if I 
knew 'Charlie Salter' out West, and told me how he was liked for his sunny 
and cheerful ways — just as he always was in after-life. ... A good many men 
can gain the respect of some one class, but it is rare that one can make such 
strong friends among all classes. The judge of the court in Duluth said that 
Dr. Salter was without exception the best man he ever knew. The newsboys 
and bootblacks took up a collection and carried it to a florist to get all the 
flowers they could with the money for the funeral. The outcasts of the city all 
went to take a last look at him, and one of the finest lot of flowers on the 
casket was sent by the bartenders' union of the city." 

Rev. Kinsley Twining, D.D., of New York (Class of 1858), writes of him: 
" Salter was one year before me at Yale, but the conventional wall between 
sophomore and freshman had no existence for such a warm-hearted man as 
he, who was ready to break out into sunshine on all occasions. Happen what 
might, he went his way, glad of heart, and merry in his pure, innocent life, 
loved by everybody and greeted with applause in all companies ; this, too, with- 
out injury to the solid, serious impression of his life or his work as a student in 



309 

college or at Andover, where I rejoined him in my final year. ... He was an 
ideal man for the pastoral ministry, overflowing with enthusiam both for its 
practical and more spiritual work. Our fields lay far apart, but our paths came 
together occasionally, and I always got much inspiration from these meetings, 
and came away from them with the feeling that a plummet had been dropped 
into my heart deeper than usual, and that higher and more self-sacrificing views 
had been opened before me. He was a little before me in my course here ; he 
has gone a little before me to the life above, but I am confidently expecting, 
in some glad day, to hear again a voice that shall say, 'Here comes Charlie 
Salter r " 

President Franklin Carter, LL.D., of the Seminary Board of Trustees, 
sends this tribute : " I made the acquaintance of Mr. Salter in my senior year 
at Phillips Academy. When I entered Yale College in 1855 he was a student 
in the Yale Divinity School. In the sophomore year he became my tutor in 
Latin and was loved by all our class. He treated me from the first as a friend, 
dropped into my room as though I were on an equality with him, and gave me 
in the most genial way advice and encouragement. He was a charming per- 
sonality, one of three who live in my thought as preeminently exhibiting the 
sunny side of the Christian life in every look and every word. It is surely more 
than thirty if not more than forty years since I saw him last, and yet his per- 
sonal presence is as vivid to me and the uplifting power of his personality as 
real as if I had seen him yesterday. I doubt whether any interview I ever had 
with him lasted over half an hour — sometimes he would not stay in my room 
over ten minutes; but the reality, the simplicity, the purity, the sweetness, the 
Christlikeness of his life I can never forget. I have not been surprised to 
learn that as a minister he attracted to himself and to his Master all sorts and 
conditions of men. It is of such a man as he that the assurance of immortality 
is strongest, and of him we easily believe that 'with unveiled face reflecting as 
a mirror the glory of the Lord,' he is 'transformed into the same image from 
glory to glory.' If all Christian ministers could present the love of Christ in 
their acts and thought as he did, it seems as if the world would be speedily won 
to our Divine Lord." 

Mr. Salter was married, June 1, 1859, to Maria Vaughan, of New Haven, 
Conn., daughter of Wanton Vaughan and Sarah Fenner Sprague; she survives 
him, with three sons and two daughters, two sons having died in childhood. 

He died of inflammation of the bladder, at Duluth, Minn., December 19, 
1897, aged sixty-five years and ten months. 



CLASS OF 1858. 

Joshua Metcalf Chamberlain. 

Son of Lieut. Eli Chamberlain and Achsah Forbes; born in West Brook- 
field, Mass., October 2, 1825; fitted for college at Thetford (Vt.) Academy; 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1855; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1855-58 ; was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting with 
Prof. E. P. Barrows at Andover, February 9, 1858. He was acting pastor at 
Dubuque, Io., in 1859; was ordained at Des Moines, Io., December 14, 1859, 
and continued pastor of the church there until 1865; was agent of the Ameri- 



3io 

can Missionary Association in Iowa, 1865-66; supplied the church at Eddyville, 
Io., 1867-68 ; removed to Grinnell and was ever after connected with Iowa 
College, as treasurer, 1868-87, and as librarian, 1889-96, having also been for 
thirty- six years a member of the Board of Trustees, and for twelve years of the 
executive committee. 

From 1869 to 1873 ne was connected with the ownership and management 
of the Grinnell Herald, and from 1881 to 1884 was editor and proprietor of the 
Grinnell Independent. He was a member of the city council of Grinnell, 
1878-80. During his pastorate at Des Moines he officiated with the other 
clergymen of the city as chaplain of the Iowa Legislature. In 1863 he served 
in the United States Christian Commission in Sherman's army. Mr. Chamber- 
lain was an older brother of Rev. L. T. Chamberlain, D.D., of the Class of 1869. 

President George A. Gates, D.D., LL.D., of Iowa College (Class of 1880), 
sends the following tribute : "Mr. Chamberlain came to Iowa in the early days 
when it was a pioneer State. He took charge of the Congregational Church in 
Des Moines when that labor was marked by opportunities, as difficult as they 
were glorious, of foundation work. The memory of his unselfish service to 
that Des Moines church is still revered in the capital city. He builded charac- 
teristics into the foundation of the church that have not needed to be relaid. 
His long connection with Iowa College was marked by the same generous 
magnanimity. He regarded his service to the college as his life work. He 
was particularly known among us as a man of careful judgment which was both 
formed and expressed with grave deliberation. During the ten years in which 
he was my colleague on the Board of Trustees he was oftener consulted by me 
than all the other members of the Board together. His long connection with 
the college made his counsel of the greatest value to me. It was constantly 
sought in matters both small and large. For seventeen years he was treasurer 
of the college. During this time he had almost the entire responsibility for the 
business management of the affairs of the college. Throughout his life in 
Grinnell, twenty-nine years, he was a foremost citizen. He was no more closely 
identified with the college than with the town. He was faithful to every obli- 
gation of church and community and college. He was a man of great dignity 
of bearing and was universally respected." 

Mr. Chamberlain was married, November 20, 1867, to Ellen Fay, of Mus- 
catine, Io., daughter of Dea. Pliny Fay and Adelia St. John. She died March 
30, 1878. He married, second, July 21, 1880, Mrs. Eliza Ann Dike, of Grinnell, 
Io., daughter of Rev. Stephen Leonard Herrick and Delia Ives, and widow of 
Charles F. Dike. She survives him. Of four children, one only is living, Miss 
Mary Chamberlain, a graduate of Iowa College, and instructor in Mills College 
and Seminary, California. 

Mr. Chamberlain died of pneumonia, at Grinnell, Io., November 12, 1897, 
aged seventy-two years, one month, and ten days. 



3H 
CLASS OF 1859. 

George Reid Ferguson. {Resident Student.) 

Son of Rev. John Ferguson and Margaret Snow Eddy; born in Attleboro, 
Mass., March 19, 1829; his boyhood was spent in Whately, Mass., where his 
father was pastor; prepared for college at Williston Seminary; graduated at 
Amherst College, 1849; entered upon his profession as a civil engineer, first on 
the Cochituate Water Works, then with a brother at New Orleans, and for three 
years, 1850-53, in the survey of the Tehuantepec Railroad in Mexico; then in 
Tennessee, and for three years in railroad surveys in Ohio ; business failing in 
the financial panic of 1857, he returned home; was converted in the "great 
awakening " of 185S, and instantly decided to enter the ministry; spent a part 
of two years in this Seminary, 1858-59, first as resident student, afterwards as 
resident licentiate, in the meantime having been licensed to preach by the 
Franklin Association, meeting at Warwick, Mass., July 20, 1859. His first 
pastorate was over the little church in North East, N. Y. (subsequently 
removed to Millerton in the same township), where he began labor in 1859, 
where he was ordained September 5, i860 (Professor Tyler of Amherst College 
preaching the sermon), and where he continued until 1874. After teaching a 
few months at Lakeville, Conn., he was pastor at Torringford, Conn., 1875-77, 
and then accompanied Rev. Andrew Murray, of the Dutch Reformed Church in 
South Africa, to Wellington, Cape Colony, where his sister, Miss Abbie P. 
Ferguson, had already opened the Huguenot Seminary, and where as principal 
of the Missionary Training Institute he labored for nineteen years, until his 
death. 

The memoir of Mr. Ferguson, published in Wellington, gives abundant 
evidence of his arduous and fruitful work as teacher, guide, and pastor of the 
young men of the mission class, whom he prepared and encouraged to enter 
mi>sionary service, not only in various stations in South Africa but on the 
shores of Lake Nyassa, in the very heart of the Dark Continent. In his 
funeral address Mr. Murray said: "In Mr. Ferguson God gave us the very 
man we needed. At a time when everything like the needful elementary prep- 
aration was wanting, he gave himself with infinite patience and with wonderful 
wisdom to meet the needs of his first pupils. In faith and hope he persevered, 
until the Mission Training Institute became what it is now, and has found 
recognition as a part of our church organization. Many a time our trustees 
and other friends who knew him have praised God as they felt how he was a 
man raised up and prepared and given by God Himself to the work." 

Mr. Ferguson was married, January 20, 1864, to Susan Amelia Pratt, of 
Andover, Mass., daughter of Rev. Miner G. Pratt (Class of 1826) and Caroline 
Drury. She survives him, with three sons and two daughters, one son having 
died in childhood. The eldest daughter is associate principal of a girls' school 
in the Orange Free State; the eldest son, a graduate of the Cape University 
and of Mansfield College, Oxford, is a Congregational minister in Cape Colony; 
the other sons are civil engineers in the Transvaal. 

Mr. Ferguson died of pernicious anaemia, at Wellington, Cape Colony, 
South Africa, June 19, 1896, aged sixty-seven years and three months. 



312 



CLASS OF 1860. 

Charles Wheeler Thompson, D.D. 

Son of Joseph Warren Thompson and Fanny Wheeler; born in Berlin, 
Vt., February 26, 1832; prepared for college at Washington County Grammar 
School, Montpelier, Vt. ; graduated at the University of Vermont, 1854, being 
the leader of his class; principal of Union High School, Burlington, Vt., 
1854-57 ; tutor, University of Vermont, 1856-57 ; took the full course in this 
Seminary, 1857-60; licensed to preach by the Suffolk South Association, meet- 
ing with Rev. J. W. Alvord, at the American Tract Society Rooms, 28 Cornhill, 
Boston, May 6, i860. He was acting pastor at St. Johnsbury Centre, Vt., 
1861 ; at Prairie du Sac, Wis., 1861-62; at Northfield, Vt., 1863; professor pro 
tempore of Latin, University of Vermont, 1863-67 ; preached in summer of 
1867 at Lanesville, Mass. ; was ordained pastor of the church in Danville, Vt., 
July 1, 1869, where he had already preached for several months, and where he 
remained fourteen years. (During one year of this pastorate, 1878, he preached, 
as a means of rest, at Winooski, Vt.) He was then acting pastor of churches in 
North and East Woodstock, Conn., 1883-86, and pastor at Westminster, Vt., 
from 1886 until compelled by failing health to resign his charge in 1896. (He 
had for the sake of his health spent the winter of 1892-93 in Roseland, La., 
supplying the church there.) He continued to reside at Westminster, with the 
exception of a few weeks spent in the Sanitarium at Clifton Springs, N. Y., 
from which he returned home the day before his death. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of 
Vermont in 1893. The addresses at his funeral were made by Rev. Joseph 
Torrey, D.D., of Shirley, Mass. (Class of 1858) ; Rev. George I. Bard, of Wal- 
pole, N. H. (Class of i860) ; and Rev. C. O. Day, of Brattleboro, Vt. (Class of 
1877). Dr. Torrey sends the following tribute : " I have known Dr. Thompson 
ever since his college days, was with him for a while at Andover Seminary, was 
his neighbor pastor during a large part of his long ministry in Danville, and 
have corresponded or conversed with him frequently ever since. He was a man 
greatly respected and beloved by all who knew him. His intellectual endow- 
ments were of a high order. Possessed of a scholarly mind, he was a careful 
and discriminating reader, not overlooking the old standard authors, and yet 
keeping himself fully abreast of the times by familiarizing himself with the best 
and freshest views of writers of the present day. He was a man of decided and 
positive opinions, yet always stated them with great modesty, and no one was 
more willing than he to give a reason for his faith, or to give a fair and candid 
hearing to those who thought differently. 

"In the pulpit, where he was equally at home with or without the manu- 
script, he was a strong, faithful, and interesting preacher, giving his hearers the 
assurance of his sincere love of the truth and of themselves. As a pastor he 
was eminently faithful and successful. Many a one has borne testimony to the 
warmth of his friendship, the kindness of his sympathy, and the sterling value of 
his counsel. In the ministerial association his papers always showed breadth 
of view, clearness of discrimination, and strength of conviction. His criticisms 
were eminently kind and appreciative. As a companion Dr. Thompson was 
delightfully social. There was a certain simplicity and genuineness about him 



313 

that easily won confidence and never disappointed it. 'An Israelite indeed, in 
whom is no guile,' you would think him to be today, and you would find him 
just the same tomorrow and every other day. Those who knew him best loved 
and trusted him most. In conversation he was brimful of wit and brightness, 
inclined to show the pleasant side of his own nature, and taking optimistic 
views of the circumstances and events of the world's current history." 

Dr. Thompson was married, November 3, 1866, to Arabella Goodrich, of 
Burlington, Vt., daughter of Chauncey Goodrich and Arabella Marsh, who 
survives him. 

He died of acute bronchitis, at Westminster, Vt., September 9, 1897, aged 
sixty- five years, six months, and fourteen days. 



CLASS OP 1862. 

Thomas Mason Boss. 

Son of Charles Dickinson Boss and Elizabeth Mason; born in New 
London, Conn., May 20, 1836; prepared for college at Williston Seminary; 
graduated at Amherst College, 1859; took the full course in this Seminary, 
1859-62 ; licensed by Essex South Association, January 7, 1862. He supplied 
the church in Jewett City, Conn., 1862-63, and other churches in Connecticut 
for short periods, but going West, was ordained over the church in Lyons, Io., 
June 5, 1866, and remained there four years; was pastor in Putnam, Conn., 
1870-76; in Springfield, Vt., 1877-84; La Crosse, Wis., 1885-88; Leavenworth, 
Kan., 1888-96, residing there afterwards, without charge, until his death. 

He published an address delivered at the centennial of the church at 
Springfield, Vt., in 188 1, and Spiritual Life the Secret of Spiritual Power, a 
paper before the Wisconsin Convention. Rev. L. Payson Broad, Superin- 
tendent of Home Missions for Kansas (Class of 1873), sends the following 
tribute: "Mr. Boss was a strong thinker and able preacher. His theology 
was of the conservative- progressive type. He invariably preached Christ and 
Him crucified, while seeking to put truth in modern forms. He did literary 
work easily. His preaching increased in effectiveness in his maturer years, 
with their riper Christian experience and enlarged responsibilites. He was a 
devoted pastor, faithful friend, zealous promoter of missions, self-sacrificing, and 
fearless advocate of truth and reform. Despite minor limitations his work for 
God's kingdom was an important one. Steadily contending during his closing 
years against insidious and painful disease, he performed his duties till Christ 
took his chastened spirit to Himself." 

Mr. Boss was married, May 15, 1866, to Annie Mindwell Lee, of Madison, 
Conn., daughter of Capt. Selah Lee and Electa Ann Bushnell, who survives 
him with two sons and two daughters, four children having died. One of the 
sons, Roger C. Boss, Washburn College, 1898, has already begun ministerial 
service in Kansas; another is in business at Omaha, Neb. ; the oldest daughter 
is an artist, the youngest a student in Bradford (Mass.) Academy. 

Mr. Boss died of kidney disease and other complications, at Leavenworth, 
Kan., July 30, 1897, aged sixty-one years, two months, and ten days. 



3*4 

Elijah Cutler. 

Son of Maj. Amos Cutler and Sarah Topliff; born in Holliston, Mass., 
February 14, 1829; fitted for college at Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass.; 
graduated at Williams College, 1856; taught select schools in Wytheville and 
Draper's Valley, Va., 1856-59, also reading medicine there, and attending 
courses of medical lectures at Philadelphia and in Harvard Medical School 
(1858-59), with view to service as a medical missionary; studied in Theological 
Institute of Connecticut, at East Windsor, 1859-61, and in this Seminary, 
1861-62. He was ordained, September 9, 1863, at Conway, Mass., and remained 
in that pastorate five years; was resident licentiate in this Seminary, 1868-69; 
acting pastor of First Church, Greenfield, Mass., 1869-71, and of the church at 
East Charlemont, Mass., 1871-72. From 1872 until his death he was agent of 
the Massachusetts Bible Society, Boston, with residence at Dorchester. 

Mr. Cutler was a brother of Rev. Lyman Cutler, of the Class of 1850, and 
of Rev. Calvin Cutler, of the Class of 1861. He was an intimate friend of 
President Garfield, who was his college classmate. He served in the United 
States Christian Commission in Virginia in the spring of 1865, ano ^ the writer 
well remembers meeting him in Petersburg on the day of its capture, and taking 
an excursion with him soon after with supplies for the wounded of both armies 
on the line of Lee's retreat. Rev. Henry S. Huntington, of Milton, Mass., a 
Seminary classmate, sends this tribute : " I do not know how better to charac- 
terize Mr. Cutler than as a thoroughly manly Christian. He possessed an 
unusual amount of practical good sense. His judgment was sound. Slow of 
speech, and perhaps of thought, his conclusions were always weighty. He had 
no little penetration as a critic. While a most kindly judge of preaching, he 
had no patience with rant or mere goody talk. He held reverently to the 
substantial verities of the gospel, but looked for progress in their comprehen- 
sion, and was in hearty sympathy with it. He had a most genial soul, and his 
conversation was lighted up with flashes of humor. No one could come into 
his presence without being conscious of his kindliness. To his friends he was 
most true and affectionate. His greetings always made one glad. A man loyal 
to his church, his college, his friends, and his home, he has gone yet nearer to 
Him who possessed the supreme loyalty of his heart." 

Mr. Cutler was married, October 12, 1863, to Ellen Maria Tucker, of Dor- 
chester, daughter of James Tucker and Rebecca Chamberlain. She survives 
him, with two sons and two daughters, two sons having died in infancy; the 
oldest son, a graduate of Williams College and Harvard Medical School, is a 
physician in Roxbury. 

Mr. Cutler died of heart failure, at Dorchester, Mass., March 2, 1898, aged 
sixty- nine years and sixteen days. 



GLASS OP 1863. 

Thomas Gordon Grassie. (Non- graduate.) 

Son of George Grassie and Elizabeth Field; born in Kildrummie, Aber- 
deenshire, Scotland, November 29, 1831 ; came to the United States with his 
father's family when ten years old; fitted for college at Bolton (Mass.) High 
School ; graduated at Amherst College, 1857 ; principal of Barre (Mass.) High 



315 

School, 1857-60; in this Seminary, 1860-63; licensed to preach by the Erie 
(Pa.) Presbytery, April 9, 1862, and supplied for six months the church in 
Wattsburg, Pa., of which his brother (Rev. William Grassie, Class of 1855) 
was pastor ; closed his studies with the winter term of 1863, in order to enter 
the army; was ordained at the South Church in Andover, March 31, 1863, and 
served as chaplain of the 108th New York Volunteers, 1863-65 ; acting pastor 
Richmond, Me., 1865-67 ; pastor Methuen, Mass., 1867-73 5 Appleton, Wis., 
1873-75; Oshkosh, Wis., 1875-77; Sycamore, 111., 1877-79; Keokuk, Io.] 
1880-83 ; secretary of the Wisconsin Home Missionary Society, 1883-92, resid- 
ing at Milwaukee; home missionary superintendent for Northern Wisconsin 
from 1892 until his sudden death at his home in Ashland, immediately after 
dictating his regular report to the Society at New York. 

As chaplain Mr. Grassie was at the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, the 
Wil ierness and other famous battles. While marching through the Wilderness 
he saw a fellow-soldier unable to march longer, gave him his own horse and 
walked himself. He caught cold, which settled in his eye, resulting in its loss. 

Rev. Edward Abbott, D. I)., of Cambridge, a Seminary classmate, writes: 
"Thomas Gordon Grassie was my chum at Andover in 1860-62. We had, I 
remember, a room in l'.artlet Hall, on the upper floor, as it now seems to me; 
and the most vivid detail of the interior of that room is Grassie, with his broad 
Scotch face and forehead and his broader Scotch brogue, sitting before the 
open Franklin stove, bent well over, poker in hand, hammering away at stick 
and coals, and talking metaphysics by the hour. It was an odd assortment, 
Grassie and the writer. Two persons in one Seminary class could hardly have 
been more unlike than we. He was many years my senior, and in most respects 
well above the average of the Seminary standard; but he treated my juvenility 
with a gentle hand, though always ready to set me right where he thought 

- wrong. He was a large-hearted as well as a large-bodied man, with a 
warm emotional and a strong intellectual nature ; fond of theology, fond of 
argument, dreamy and yet practical, impulsive, affectionate, full of energy, for- 
getful, assiduous at his work, visionary, humorous, always the best of company, 
always ready for a 'scrap,' but always coming out of it with a smiling face, a 
good-natured tone of voice, and a hearty grasp of the hand. I remember that 
with his high, bald forehead, and his varied experience of men and things, he 
seemed to my youthful imagination old enough almost to be my father. He 
was certainly one of the geniuses of the class. He had the respect of all, 
both students and instructors. I think we felt that he rose to heights and 
descended to depths in his speculations that few of us could reach. In de- 
bate he was a foeman worthy of Professor Park's or Professor Phelps's steel. 
Nobody could hoodwink him. He was alert, keen, up in an instant when he 
saw his adversary off his guard, and ever generous to a fallen foe. Since leav- 
ing the Seminary I have lost sight of him, and had heard nothing of him for a 
long time, until the tidings of his death came to me on the Friday after Ascen- 
sion Day. That he has gone to be with the Lord he loved and served, and has 
been received, or will be, with the ' Well done, good and faithful servant,' no 
one can for a moment doubt. A truer-hearted, nobler-spirited, more devoted 
man I never knew." 

From an obituary notice in the Chicago Advance, written by Rev. Homer 
W. Carter, of Beloit, Wis. (Class of 1876), who succeeded Mr. Grassie as 



3>6 

secretary of the Wisconsin Home Missionary Society, the following quotation 
is made : "His character is summed up in the one word, strength. Robust- 
ness of body, robustness of mind, robustness of soul, were characteristics. Mr. 
Grassie had ideas; he had convictions; he had expressions, and they were all 
and always strong. When sometimes he seemed to stride roughshod over 
others, it was not in unkindness or in vindictiveness, but rather in unswerving 
devotion to lofty ideals and deep convictions as to the standards of the ministry, 
of the church, and of character. Nothing could daunt him, nothing could 
move him from these ideals. Mr. Grassie would not spare himself. He 
worked himself to death, and this at the age of sixty-six, and in spite of that 
robust constitution and calm cheerfulness. Shirking, laziness, and selfishness 
were thoroughly foreign to his nature. In thinking of Scripture appropriate to 
the case, one thinks of Elijah in his prophetic leadership and flashes of indig- 
nation against iniquity ; of Moses and Joshua in their leadership ; and he is 
grateful that such a one has held leadership among us, in shaping things for 
the kingdom of righteousness." 

Mr. Grassie was married, April 7, 1863, t0 Mary Elizabeth Holbrook, of 
Barre, Mass. (Mt. Holyoke Seminary, 1863), daughter of Henry Holbrook and 
Sally Wadsworth, who survives him. They had five daughters and three sons; 
one of the sons was educated at Beloit College and is a journalist; two of the 
daughters were educated at Mt. Holyoke College, one of them, Mrs. Effie 
Grassie Chappie, dying in Arizona in 1897 ; one son died in infancy. 

Mr. Grassie died of diabetes and heart disease, at Ashland, Wis., April 28, 
1898, aged sixty-six years, four months, and twenty-nine days. 



CLASS OP 1870. 
Jeremiah Ellsworth Fullerton. 

Son of Galen Otis Fullerton and Sarah Ann Ellsworth ; born in Readfield, 
Me., July 4, 1843; his father dying at New Orleans, where the family removed 
in his infancy, he returned with his mother when he was five years old, to her 
native city, Bath, Me. ; prepared for college in the high school there ; graduated 
at Bowdoin College, 1865; principal of Hallowell (Me.) Academy, 1865-66; 
in this Seminary 1866-68; licensed by the Lincoln (Me.) West Association, 
November 3, 1868; supplied the churches in Solon and Bingham, Me., 1868-69; 
completed his studies at Andover, 1869-70. He was ordained as an evangelist 
at Cumberland Mills, in Westbrook, Me., September 8, 1870, and was acting 
pastor of the Warren Church there, 1870-72; was pastor of the church in 
Southbridge, Mass., 1873-76; of the church in Laconia, N. H., 1877-81 ; acting 
pastor at Hopkinton, Mass., 1881-86; at Brighton, Mass., 1887-90; Bellows 
Falls, Vt., from December, 1890 (being installed pastor March 25, 1891), to the 
time of his death. 

Mr. Fullerton preached the annual sermon before the General Convention 
in 1897, and nearly every year was called upon for addresses on Memorial Day. 
All his work was done in the face of physical weakness and suffering, resulting 
from a fall on the sidewalk in New Orleans, in his childhood. Rev. C. O. Day, 
of Brattleboro, Vt. (Class of 1877), speaks of this in the following extract from 
a newspaper notice: "A man of great intellectual strength, decided opinions, 



317 

wide learning, clear and forcible utterance, warm and sensitive heart, his devo- 
tion was still his chief characteristic. He could not be daunted by ill-health or 
pain or discouragement. There was a touch of the heroic in him, and all he had 
and was he was ready to spend freely for Christ and his fellow-men. Years ago, 
when at Andover Seminary, he made the same strong impression of consecrated 
fearlessness upon the large class of Academy boys whom he taught." 

Rev. George A. Hood, of the Congregational Church Building Society 
(Class of 1869), writes: "From the time of our acquaintance at Andover I 
have always watched Mr. Fullerton with interest. Bound up in that quiet and 
unassuming nature were many excellences: strong common sense and good 
judgment which others relied upon ; wise hopefulness which uplifted others; a 
brotherliness which always stretched out the helpful hand. He always seemed 
equal to every demand made on him, quick to see the right thing to be done 
and prompt to do it. We did not appreciate him when he was among us, 
just because he was so far from self-assertion or self-seeking; because he was 
such a Christian hero that he went right along in his many lines of work with 
undaunted courage and grit when most of us would have succumbed to pain, 
preferring to add to the happiness of those about him, rather than to call out 
their sympathy for his suffering." 

Mr. Fullerton was married, October 12, 1876, to Sarah Elizabeth Otis, of 
Woolwich, Me., daughter of Christopher Tilden Otis and Harriet Huston. She 
survives him with two daughters, a son having died in infancy. 

He died of concussion of the spine (injury received by a fall a few days 
before), at Bellows Falls, Vt, October 27, 1897, aged fifty-four years, three 
months, and twenty- three days. 



GLASS OF 1880. 

John Calvin Staples. 

Son of Calvin Staples and Clarissa Rogers Sears; born in New Bedford, 
Mass., January 31, 1842; prepared for college in the New Bedford High 
School, but the death of his father prevented the prosecution of his studies. 
He engaged in business, first as a clerk in New Bedford, afterwards as a book- 
keeper in New York City, Newtonville, Mass., and Taunton, Mass. After 
sixteen years of business life he yielded to a strong conviction of his duty to 
enter the ministry, and took the full course in this Seminary, 1877-80. He was 
licensed to preach by the Old Colony Association, at New Bedford, April 30, 

1879. H e was ordained as pastor of the church at East Jaffrey, N. H., July 6, 

1880, and remained there till the close of 1882; was pastor at South Deerfield, 
Mass., from January 1, 1883, to January 1, 1885, and at Littleton, Mass., from 
January 1, 1885, to January 1, 1890. After a few months of home missionary 
service at Lake Helen, Fla., he was pastor at Harwich, Mass., from January 1, 
1891, to January 1, 1893. His failing health then compelled him to retire from 
the active ministry, and he resided afterwards, without charge, at New Bedford. 
He often preached, however, and for three years from January, 1894, was gen- 
eral manager of the New Bedford Charity Organization. 

His classmate, Rev. Rufus B. Tobey, of Boston, sends the following 
tribute: "Though Mr. Staples and I were born in the same city, we were not 



3i8 

personally acquainted until we matriculated at Andover. But he was by no 
means a stranger. Although engaged in business in the West, his reputation 
as a Christian worker was well known in the home of his childhood. I used to 
think of him as one who lent himself to business, but gave himself to the ser- 
vice of God. When God called him from business life into the ministry, many 
obstacles had to be removed before he could make the radical change. He 
overcame everything, and brought his wife and two children to Andover in the 
fall of 1877. Here the sympathy that literally suffers with another in his afflic- 
tion, already developed by the death of an honored father and a beloved brother, 
was intensified by the loss of his darling boy. In fact, God seemed to be fit- 
ting him by affliction to minister to bereaved ones. Early in his ministry his 
surviving brother passed away, then his mother, and later his wife and only 
daughter. He now made his home with his sister in New Bedford. When 
the work of the Associated Charities was started there he was called to the 
charge. It was felt that because of his business training and his sympathetic 
nature he was peculiarly fitted for the place. But the cry of suffering humanity 
and the many calls for sympathy and aid overwhelmed him. He confessed to 
me, the last time I saw him, that he bore the burden until it fairly crushed him. 
Then he laid it down. The methodical training of his commercial life enabled 
Mr. Staples to accomplish far more than if he had been merely a student, yet it 
was when he walked with God in his later experiences of deep affliction that 
he gained the largest measure of his power as a Christian minister." 

Mr. Staples was married, January 7, 1868, to Helen Maria Eels, of Mari- 
etta, O., daughter of John Mead Eels and Susan Ann Hooker. She died 
July 12, 1890. Their only son died in 1879, at tne a 8 e °f three, and their 
only daughter in December, 1893, at tne a S e °f twenty-five. 

He died of consumption, at New Bedford, Mass., November 25, 1897, aged 
fifty-five years, nine months, and twenty-five days. 

GLASS OF 1881. 

Sylvester Storrs Grinnell. {Resident Licentiate.) 

Son of Jeremiah Grinnell (a prominent minister among the Friends) and 
Martha Taber; born in Mt. Gilead, O., January 12, 1850; the family residing 
afterwards in Iowa, Indiana, and Tennessee, his preparatory education was 
obtained in Iowa, at Farmers' Institue, Indiana (of which his father had charge), 
and at Maryville, Tenn. ; graduated at Maryville College, 1874; at Oberlin 
Theological Seminary, 1878; licensed to preach by the Cleveland (O.) Congre- 
gational Conference, at North Ridgeville, O., April 16, 1878. He began to 
preach at Rochester, Vt., in June, 1878, was ordained there January 14, 1879, 
and remained until November, 1880; studied in this Seminary as resident 
licentiate, 1880-81 ; preached at Green River, Wyoming, in the summer of 
1881 ; labored two years in Des Moines, Io., organizing the Pilgrim Church 
in 1883; pastor, Rockford, Io., 1884-87; Lancaster, Wis., 1887-90; River Falls, 
Wis., 1890-94; supplied the Pacific Church, St. Paul, Minn., in the summer of 
1894; pastor, Alpena, Mich., 1894-96; without charge at Pasadena, Cal., from 
December, 1896, to the time of his death. 

Several of Mr. Grinnell's sermons were published in pamphlet form, and 
many pieces of verse, of superior merit, in the newspapers. Rev. Herbert W. 



3i9 

Lathe (Class of 1877), who, as pastor at Pasadena, knew Mr. Grinnell in the last 
year of his life, sends this tribute : " Mr. Grinnell was a very devoted and con- 
secrated man. His early association with the Friends largely accounts for the 
spiritual tone of his preaching, which was earnest, direct, and persuasive. He 
took a serious view of a minister's duties and opportunities, as one who should 
give account of the souls committed to his charge. He was a man of sound 
judgment, a good counsellor, genuine all through, and lovable. God greatly 
honored him in the winning of souls, in which respect he left a record which 
might be envied by many eminent preachers." Rev. Homer W. Carter (Class 
of 1876), Secretary of the Wisconsin Home Missionary Society, wrote of him 
in the Advance : l * His fidelity was unfailing. He was an earnest and successful 
soul- winner, a diligent student, with a constant ambition to make the most and 
best of himself for the furtherance of his mission as an ambassador of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. His constitution was not rugged, yet his energy along the way 
of high ideals was untiring. Many, in different parts of the country, will count 
him as their spiritual father, though he had not yet passed out of the years of 
middle life." 

He was married, January 18, 1887, to Corrinna Amira Phelps, of Rock- 
ford, Io., daughter of Chauncey Moss Phelps and Alma Heaton. She survives 
him, with one daughter, a son having died in 1894. 

He died of pernicious anaemia, in Pasadena, Cal., December 12, 1897, aged 
forty-seven years and eleven months. 



GLASS OF 1892. 

John Rounds Smith. 

Son of John Rounds Smith and Sarah Elizabeth Bullen ; born at Salem, 
Mass., March II, 1867 ; prepared for college at the Salem High School ; gradu- 
ated at Harvard College, 1889; took the full course in this Seminary, 1889-92 ; 
was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting at Bartlet Chapel, 
Andover, June I, 1891. He was ordained pastor of the Memorial Church, 
Georgetown, Mass., September 1, 1892, and dismissed February 13, 1895. He 
afterwards supplied the church in Danielson, Conn., for some weeks, and 
preached occasionally in other places. He then engaged in business, repre- 
senting two manufacturing companies in Chicago, and was there killed by the 
explosion of a soda fountain tank, repairs on which he was superintending. 

Rev. Emery L. Bradford, of Boxford, Mass., his Seminary classmate, 
writes: "Although little acquainted with Mr. Smith at Andover, being a 
member of his class only one year, his settlement at Georgetown was only five 
miles from me, and I knew very well the quality of his work there. He was 
an earnest, devoted, zealous, consecrated minister. He faced the peculiar and 
difficult problems of his field with courage and a lofty purpose. If the outcome 
was not all he hoped and prayed and unceasingly labored for, it was not because 
of lack of self-sacrificing labor on his part. I was on the council that dismissed 
him, and I came away with an exalted estimate of the manliness, the courage, 
the straightforward and unfaltering purpose of my friend and classmate, lie 
surely sacrificed himself to the cause he loved. His going is the first break in 



320 

the Class of 1892. His untimely death is a personal shock and grief to all his 
classmates." 

Rev. David L. Yale, of Ellsworth, Me., another classmate, sends the fol- 
lowing : " During the three years of his Seminary course Mr. Smith sang in 
one of the Salem churches, this absence withdrawing him from the class life 
during its leisure hours. Yet his strong, unique personality made for him a 
large place in the regard of his classmates. Though he had given his voice the 
best of training, he used it as generously in the smallest of our social meetings 
as he did in the large Salem church, and for three years his clear, ringing voice 
imparted to the morning chapel singing a spirit that was hearty and full of 
faith. The Class of 1892 all remember the evening when, from the steps of 
Phillips Hall, with a passing organ-grinder for accompanist, he sang his way, 
impromptu, into all our hearts, and taught us that a strong love of fellowship lay 
underneath his apparent reserve. Impulsive, forceful, always strong, he has 
left an impress of himself on our class which must endure and which we all 
gladly cherish." At Evanston, 111., where he had only a few weeks before his 
death selected a home to which he was about to remove his family, he had 
already won hearty appreciation at the First Congregational Church as a 
member of its choir and leader of its Sunday school singing. " On the previous 
Sunday [before his death] he had impressed all by his rendering of Tennyson's 
pathetic, and for himself prophetic, hymn of faith, 'Crossing the Bar.'" 

Rev. DeWitt S. Clark, D.D., ©f Salem (Class of 1868), writes of him: 
" His death was a great shock to us all here. He was a fine fellow, genuine, 
earnest, enterprising, and with excellent gifts. I think he had a special fitness 
for business life, in which he was developing a rather unusual ability. I greatly 
respected him for not waiting around for a pulpit such as he wanted, but for 
going right at the thing which offered, in a practical way." 

Mr. Smith was married, September 22, 1892, to Mary Evelyn Lyman, of 
Salem, Mass., daughter of Jabez B. Lyman, M.D. (Class of 1845), an< ^ Lucy 
DePue. She survives him, with one son. 

Mr. Smith died of injuries received from an explosion, in St. Luke's 
Hospital, Chicago, 111., April 19, 1898, aged thirty-one years, one month, and 
eight days. 



GLASS OP 1896. 

James Peter King. 

Son of Rev. Adam G. King, D.D., and Elizabeth King George; born in 
Delhi, N. Y., March 30, 1870; prepared for college at Delaware Academy 
in Delhi; graduated at the College of New Jersey, 1892; studied theology in 
Berlin, 1892-93, and in Leipsic, 1893-94; was licensed to preach by the Stam- 
ford (Ont.) Presbytery of the United Presbyterian Church, April 9, 1895; 
preached at Walton, Ont., in the summer of 1895 5 completed his theological 
study in this Seminary, 1895-96; was ordained, with three of his classmates, by 
a special council at the Seminary Chapel in Andover, June 8, 1898, Dr. Lyman 
Abbott preaching the sermon. Entering the home missionary seryice, he 
was pastor of the Congregational churches at Tyndall and Bonhomme, South 
Dakota, from September, 1896, to March, 1897. The care of these churches, 



321 

twelve miles apart, was too much for his frail body, and in failing health he 
returned to his father's home in Gait, where he steadily declined until his death. 

Mr. King's fine scholarship won constant recognition throughout his edu- 
cational career. In his preparatory course he took prizes for oratory, and in 
classics and mathematics. At Princeton he was awarded the Dickinson prize, 
the Alexander Guthrie McCosh prize, the Chancellor Green Mental Science 
Fellowship prize, and the English Salutatory at graduation. In the Seminary 
he received a prize of fifty dollars for an essay on the Theory of Evolution. 

Rev. John Comin, a classmate and special friend, sends this tribute from 
Chamberlain, S. D. : " From the time I knew Mr. King first, as a student in 
the University of Berlin, until his death five years later, we were fast friends 
— inseparable in all our work, amusements, and plans. Of him it could be said 
most truly, 'he coveted the best gifts.' For anything trivial he had neither 
time nor inclination. He was a man thoroughly in earnest, and found his chief 
delight in wrestling with the great problems of philosophy and religion. But 
though he was exceptionally well equipped as a scholar and familiar with the 
world's best thought on the problems of life, he felt that his work lay along 
practical lines, and hence resolutely refused to be turned from the actual work 
of the ministry. As a minister he was faithful, both in his preparation for the 
pulpit and in the care of his people. If the humblest of his hearers received 
new light from his preaching he was delighted beyond measure. He saw and 
thoroughly appreciated the humorous side of life, and was as enthusiastic in his 
devotion to every kind of legitimate amusement as to the earnest work of life. 
He was not a man who talked much about his religious experience, even to his 
most intimate friends ; but that he was deeply reverent no one could doubt. A 
braver, more uncomplaining soul through a long, tedious illness I never saw. 
To our narrowed vision it would seem that the world could better have spared 
many another man." 

Mr. King died of tuberculosis, at Gait, Ont., November 23, 1897, aged 
twenty- seven years, seven months, and twenty- four days. 



322 

The roll of our dead for the year includes thirty-six names. Although two 
of the number died in early manhood — one of these by accident — the average 
age of all is seventy years, three months, and twenty-two days. Twenty-three 
had passed beyond the limit of threescore years and ten, and seven beyond 
fourscore years. 

Twenty- one were full graduates, ten took a partial course here, and five 
were in the Seminary as resident students or resident licentiates. Thirty-three 
out of the thirty-six men were college graduates, twelve coming from Amherst, 
five from Dartmouth, three from Yale and three from the University of Ver- 
mont, and one each from Bowdoin, Harvard, Illinois, Marietta, Maryville, 
Princeton, Union, Wabash, Waterville, and Williams. 

The significant characteristic of the men whose record is here given is the 
long period of active, useful service which nearly every one was permitted to 
render. Professor Tyler, the first on the list, the oldest in years, and without 
question the most widely known of all, taught nearly sixty years in Amherst 
College, while Caleb Emery and Professor Griggs had each been in educational 
service for over forty years. Three were missionaries of the American Board — 
Laurie, Hazen, and Webb — and had labored respectively, either abroad or at 
home, for forty-three, fifty, and fifty-three years; and to this record should be 
added the long and devoted service of Ferguson in South Africa. Dr. Poor, Dr. 
Taylor, Joshua M. Chamberlain, Charles Strong Smith, and Elijah Cutler had 
for many years given valuable administrative service to the institutions of the 
church, while Dimond, Salter, and Grassie gave lavishly of their hearts and lives 
to Christian work in the great West. Ide, Tuttle, McCorkle, Howard, and 
others spent forty or more years in faithful pastoral service. All were true, 
earnest, successful men, whose lives have brought honor to their Seminary and 
borne abundant fruit to the glory of their divine Master. 



The following men are still living of classes previous to and including the 
Class of 1838 — sixty years ago ; their average age is nearly eighty-eight years : 

1831. Rev. Prof. Edwards A. Park, D.D., LL.D., Andover, Mass. . 89 

1832. Rev. Elias Riggs, D.D., LL.D., Constantinople, Turkey ... 87 

1833. Rev. George W. Kelley, Haverhill, Mass 89 

1834. Rev. J. Jay Dana, Housatonic, Mass 86 

Mr. Joseph L. Partridge, Brooklyn, N. Y 94 

Prof. Samuel Porter, Washington, D. C 88 

1835. Rev. Bela Fancher, Homer, Mich 91 

Rev. Joseph W. Cross, West Boylston, Mass 90 

1836. Rev. Prof. Joseph Packard, D.D., Theological Seminary, Va. . 85 

1837. Rev. Samuel H. Emery, D.D., Taunton, Mass 82 

Rev. John Wesley Merrill, D.D., Concord, N. H 90 

Rev. John Pike, D.D., Rowley, Mass 84 

Rev. Ebenezer G. Parsons, Derry, N. H 85 

Rev. Erastus W. Thayer, Springfield, 111 86 

1838. William C. Burke, M.D., Cheyenne, Wyo 86 

Rev. Prof. Samuel Harris, D.D., LL.D., New Haven, Ct. . . . 84 

Rev. Thomas S. Hubbard, Stockbridge, Vt 86 

Rev. Washington A. Nichols, Lake Forest, 111 90 

Rev. Charles S. Sherman, Manchester Green, Ct 88 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The Association was reorganized in June, 1895. Its objects are 
to maintain a friendly acquaintance among the Alumni of the Seminary 
and a helpful interest in its welfare, to arrange for the regular meet- 
ing held during Anniversary Week at Andover, to provide for the 
distribution of the Seminary catalogue and anniversary programs, and 
especially to ensure the continued publication of the annual Necrology 
and Address List of members. 

The Committee appointed last year to arrange for a second reunion 
of the Alumni in Boston decided to postpone the same until autumn, 
when due notice will be given. 

A full Address List of all living Alumni is being prepared, but it 
was not possible to finish it in time for this anniversary. In order that 
this list may be complete and accurate, Alumni are specially requested 
to report any change in their own addresses, and to aid in securing those 
of their classmates. These addresses, with information coming to their 
knowledge of the death of any past student of the institution, should be 
sent to the Secretary. 

All past students of the Seminary, including non-graduates, 
resident licentiates, and members of Advanced Classes, may become 
members of the Association. The annual fee of membership is one 
dollar, the payment of which entitles the member to receive the 
Seminary publications. Remittance of dues should be made to the 
Treasurer, Rev. VV. L. Ropes, Andover. 



OFFICERS. 

Rev. Samuel W. Dike, LL.D., Class of 1866, Moderator, 1897. 
Charles C. Torrey, Ph.D., Class of 1889, ^ Executive 
Rev. George H. Gutterson, Class of 1878, 
Rev. George E. Street, Class of 1863, 



1807-08. 
Rev. Calvin M. Clark, Class of 1888, J 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter, Andover, Class of 1875, Secretary, 1893-98. 

Rev. W. L. Ropes, Andover, Class of 1852, Treasurer, 1895-98. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



NECROLOGY, 



1898-99, 



PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 7, 1399, 

By C. C CARPENTER, Secretary. 



Second Printed Series, No. p. 



BOSTON: 

Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, 14 Beacon Street, 

1899. 



INDEX. 



Class. Age. Page. 

1843. Ebenezer Alden 79 340 

1S42. David McGee Bardwell 82 339 

1842. Samuel C. Bartlett 80 336 

1864. Henry L. Baugher 58 362 

1869. James Brand 65 364 

1846. William T. Briggs 82 346 

1870. Thomas S. Burnell 76 367 

1851. Ira Case 78 351 

1845. A. Huntington Clapp 80 342 

1894. John S. Colby 47 371 

1853. William C. Dickinson 72 353 

1897. Norman Dutcher 28 372 

1845. Samuel B. Fairbank 75 344 

1869. Ebenezer N. Fernald 64 365 

1897. William C. Fessenden 29 373 

1880. Harrison W. Furber 48 370 

1853. George H. Gould 72 354 

1849. John H. Gurney 77 349 

1833. George W. Kelly 90 330 

1842. John S. Kidder 86 338 

1847. William De Loss Love 78 347 

1855. Spencer Marsh 69 359 

1854. John O. Murray 71 357 

1857. Roswell D. Parker 72 360 

1839. Parker Pillsbury 88 332 

1845. George W. Porter 81 345 

1848. William T. Reynolds 75 349 

1877. William C. Rogers 49 370 

1838. Charles S. Sherman 88 331 

1853. Alfred L. Skinner 74 356 

187 1. Jesse P. Sprowls 53 369 

1869. Charles A. Towle 61 366 

1859. Pliny F. Warner 67 362 

1849. Philo B. Wilcox 80 351 

1840. Worcester Willey 90 334 

Trustees. 

Rowland Hazard 69 327 

Theodore M. Osborne 49 329 



nsriEaiR.oLoa-'Y". 



TRUSTEES. 

Hon. Rowland Hazard. 

Son of Hon. Rowland Gibson Hazard, LL.D., and Caroline Newbold ; 
born in Newport, R. I., August 16, 1829; when he was four years old his 
father's home was removed to Peace Dale, R. I. ; at six years of age he attended 
the Nine Partners' School in Dutchess County, N. Y., and at seven, Kingston 
(R. I.) Academy; studied Latin and mathematics under private tuition of Rev. 
Thomas Vernon, at Kingston, R. I.; in 1845 entered Haverford School, 
Haverford, Pa., and in 1846, Brown University, graduating in 1849. Traveling 
and studying abroad, 1850 and 1851, in company with his classmate and inti- 
mate friend, James B. Angell (now president of Michigan University), he 
returned to begin his career as a manufacturer at Peace Dale, which continued 
to be his residence and the scene of his many-sided business and benevolent 
activities throughout his life. 

Mr. Hazard was superintendent of the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company 
from 1855, and in 1864 the treasurer and senior partner. His business interests 
were extensive and varied. In 1881 he introduced the manufacture of soda, by 
the ammonia process, into this country, organizing a company for its production 
in Syracuse, N. Y., of which he was the president. He owned for several years 
a lead mine in Missouri, and became personally familiar with the details of 
mining processes and methods. He was president of the What Cheer Insurance 
Company, and of other business and industrial organizations. He was specially 
interested in agriculture and the improvement of farming stock ; he was presi- 
dent of the Washington County Agricultural Society from its foundation in 
1876, and built a memorial hall on its fair grounds at West Kingston, where he 
delivered annua) addresses of notable value. He was an expert in architecture; 
planned and built, not only in connection with his own works, but the public 
buildings and picturesque stone bridges of Peace Dale, and was chairman of 
the committee for construction of the library of Brown University. 

He was a member of the Rhode Island Historical Society and of the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society; a trustee of Brown University, 1875-88, 
and from 1888 one of the Fellows of the institution; a trustee of the Butler 
Hospital for the Insane, a corporate member of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions from 1877, and one of the Board of Trustees 
of this Seminary, elected in 1889 to take the place of Hon. Horace Fairbanks 
of Vermont. He was for many years the moderator of the annual town meeting 
in South Kingstown, a representative of the town in the State Legislature, and a 
member of the State Senate. In 1875 he was an independent candidate for 
governor of Rhode Island, and although receiving a plurality of the popular 
vote, failed of an election in the Legislature. 

Side by side with Mr. Hazard's fidelity to the duties of private business and 
public trust was his unceasing, untiring devotion to the welfare of others, in 



328 

a wide range of educational and philanthropic interests. He introduced the 
profit-sharing system into his mills, remodeled the tenement houses of his 
establishment, and encouraged his employees to purchase their own homes. 
He was instrumental in establishing a public library and a high school, for 
which he gave the land, built (with his brother) a stone Memorial Hall 
at Peace Dale in memory of his father, and a stone edifice for the Peace Dale 
Congregational Church, which was organized in his own house in 1857, and to 
which he left a generous bequest. He bequeathed one hundred thousand 
dollars to Brown University. 

Rev. James G. Vose, D.D., of Providence, R. I. (Class of 1854), a fellow- 
trustee of the Seminary, writes : "The life of Mr. Hazard was full of usefulness 
and surrounded by great advantages and opportunities, well improved. He led 
a quiet country life in his boyhood, a keen observer, a thoughtful, modest 
youth. His father, Rowland G. Hazard, the eminent philosopher, gave him 
both the example and the precept of great thoroughness and accuracy in all 
that he did. At Brown University he was fortunate in the companionship of 
students of high character, who afterwards attained great distinction. The 
influence of President Wayland was at its height and his colleagues in teaching 
were eminent men. Brought up a Quaker, Mr. Hazard was always devout, 
and in college received a new impulse in the Christian life. On his marriage 
he and his wife founded the Congregational Church in Peace Dale, and their 
festering care made it a great blessing to the whole village. It is now one of 
the most prosperous churches in Rhode Island. Mr. Hazard was deeply inter- 
ested in missions and a warm advocate of a liberal policy, and a generous giver 
to the American Board. He was independent in all his views, a man of the 
highest rectitude and truthfulness. He might easily have attained any office in 
the State, had he been more pliant in political methods. He once received a 
plurality of votes for governor of the State, and no man would have better filled 
the chair of senator in Congress. But he had no fancy for the arts of self- 
advancement. He aimed to instruct and elevate his fellow-citizens, and his 
addresses on public occasions were well worth preserving. The memorial ser- 
vice on the last day of the year 189S was very impressive. The address of 
President Angell of Ann Arbor, his life-long friend, was full of deep pathos 
and a worthy tribute to the noblest qualities. His domestic life was filled with 
rare happiness and harmony, until clouded by the illness and death of his 
beloved wife, a woman of rare attractiveness and exalted character. Children 
and grandchildren grew up around them, and we may hope and believe that the 
virtues of his noble ancestry will live again in them." 

Mr. Hazard was married, March 29, 1S54, to Margaret Anna Rood, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., daughter of Rev. Anson Rood and Alida Gouverneur Ogden. 
She died August 7, 1895. He left two sons, graduates of Brown University, 
who succeeded him in the care of his manufacturing interests, and three daugh- 
ters, one of whom, Miss Caroline Hazard, is the president-elect of Wellesley 
College. 

Mr. Hazard died of degeneration of the heart, at Glen Springs, N. Y., 
August 16, 189S, on his sixty-ninth birthday. 



329 
Theodore Moody Osborne. 

Son of George Abbott Osborne and Hannah Sawyer Moody; born in 
Peabody (then the South Parish of Danvers), Mass., November 25, 1849; fitted 
for college at the Peabody High School; graduated at Harvard College,' 187 1 ; 
studied law with Hon. William D. Northend, Salem; studied civil engineering 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1871-72; in 1872 engaged in 
engineering in Nebraska, in the employ of the Burlington and Missouri River 
Railroad Company; was librarian of the Peabody Institute, Peabodv, Mass., 
1873-80. Having studied law with Hon. William D. Northend, Salem, he was 
admitted to the bar in January, 1880, and practiced law in Salem ; in 1885 
opened an office (Osborne & Marshall) in Boston, retaining his residence in 
Salem. From 1888 to the time of his death he was assistant clerk of the Supe- 
rior Court for Suffolk County, in charge as clerk of the equity division of the 
court. 

Mr. Osborne served on the School Board of Peabody, and was a member 
of the Essex Institute, of the Essex Congregational Club, and of the Salem 
Oratorio. He was for several years a deacon in the South Congregational 
Church, Salem, to which he had transferred his membership from the South 
Church, Peabody. He was a member of the Board of Trustees of Phillips 
Academy (and Andover Theological Seminary) from 1895. He wrote a valu- 
able history of the town of Peabody for the History of Essex County. 

Hon. Robert R. Bishop of the Trustees sends the following tribute to his 
colleague on the Board : " Mr. Osborne possessed a very beautiful character. 
To quietness of disposition and simplicity of tastes he added strength of con- 
viction and marked clearness of mind. He was very thoroughly trained in 
legal studies, and was without a superior in his knowledge of equity practice. 
During his occupancy of the position of equity clerk, for more than ten years, 
he performed a great amount of accurate, painstaking and valuable work, and 
was of great assistance to the court. By his fidelity, intelligence and skill in 
that department he won the high regard both of the court and of the members 
of the bar, and by his demeanor attached himself to many earnest friends, who 
deplore his loss. 

Mr. Osborne was married, October 19, 1882, to Soledad Alicia Machado, 
of Salem, Mass., daughter of Juan Francisco Machado and Elizabeth F. Jones. 
She survives him, with a son and daughter. 

Mr. Osborne died in Boston, February 6, 1899, aged forty-nine years, two 
months, and fifteen days. 



33° 



ALUMNI 



CLASS OP 1833. 

George Washington Kelly. 

Son of Nathaniel Kelly and Catherine Surbaugh ; born in Greenbriar 
County, Va. (now West Virginia), August 5, 1808; fitted for college at Lewis- 
burg (Va.) Academy; graduated at Ohio University in 1830; took the full 
course in this Seminary, 1830-1833, his graduating address, September 11, 1833, 
being on "The Influence of Robert Hall on Pulpit Discourse;" was licensed to 
preach by the Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Milton Badger, 
Andover, April 17, 1833. He was ordained pastor over the church in Hamilton, 
Mass., July 3, 1834, remaining there sixteen years, until 1850. He resided 
afterwards in Haverhill until his death. 

The history of his early years is an interesting one. Born and raised in a 
slave State, he came to have a strong abhorrence of slavery, which was so 
intensified by his witnessing, at the age of nineteen, the cruel treatment of a 
female slave, that he resolved to leave the land of slavery forever. He made 
his way through the wilderness, forded the Ohio, and entered — one year in 
advance — the University at Athens. After his graduation he crossed the 
Alleghanies on horseback to Baltimore, where he sold his horse and continued 
his journey to Andover by the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal to Philadelphia, 
and thence by stage. 

The most active and the happiest part of his life was while engaged in his 
Hamilton pastorate. " Gail Hamilton " was one of his parishioners there, and 
in the paper entitled "A Byway of History" in X-Ray.s — her last work — 
thus speaks of him : " Rev. J. B. Felt occupied the pulpit but ten years, 
through failure of health having been unable to preach for almost a year. His 
successor, Rev. George W. Kelly, of Virginia, was also obliged to resign his 
pulpit for the same reason, but remained long enough to endear himself to his 
people as an incarnation of Christian gentleness, patience, and beneficence. 
Ministered to by loving hands, the serene evening of his life is alight with the 
coming dawn." Rev. J. G. Nichols (Class of 1894), the present pastor at 
Hamilton, writes of Mr. Kelly's pastorate there: " His ministry was a very 
successful one in every way. He was an acceptable preacher and very much 
beloved as a pastor. The church was stirred by a mighty revival in 1843, a 
large number joining the church in that and the succeeding years, some of 
whom remain to this day, so that the church has not yet ceased to feel the 
influence of his work. All through his life he continued to pray for the welfare 
of this his only church, and in his last hours, when in a semi- unconscious 
state, he talked constantly about Hamilton and his people, mentioning the 
names of many who had been dead for many years." 

His life at Haverhill was a very quiet one, but by no means inactive, his 
counsel and aid being heartily enlisted in carrying out the benevolent plans of 
Mr. David Marsh, his father-in-law, in the maintenance of religious and educa- 
tional institutions, as also in writing and speaking in behalf of the anti-slavery 



33i 

movement. He lived to see this triumphant and his native Virginia a free 
State. Mr. Kelly was a member of the New England Historic-Genealogical 
Society, and gave much time to the study of early American history. Rev. 
Calvin M. Clark (Class of 1888), pastor of the Centre Church, Haverhill, 
writes : " Ever since I have known Mr. Kelly, he has been more than an 
octogenarian, and of course in failing health and powers. Despite, however, 
his infirmities, I have always been impressed with his eagerness to keep himself 
informed of all that was going on, and with his intelligence of opinion on 
matters of real interest. He was the interested, thoughtful scholar to the last. 
None who knew him at all could have failed to remark, also, his urbanity of 
manner. I <hall never forget with what considerateness and courtliness of 
manner the aged parishioner, once himself a pastor, met the young man who 
had just entered upon the pastorate of the church of which he was a member 
during all the last years of his life. That church has reason to remember, and 
with gratitude, its aged member, for in the days of his activity, prior to the 
memory of most of the present members, he had served it well as deacon, 
Sunday school teacher, clerk, and in other capacities. Mr. Kelly has added 
another proof of the correctness of the Word: 'The hoary head is a crown 
of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousness.' He gave ample illustra- 
tion of how one may grow old beautifully. In no small degree, for him, was 
the best wine reserved for the feast's end." 

Mr. Kelly was married, May 21, 1835, to Mary Marsh, of Haverhill, 
daughter of David Marsh and Sarah Colby. She died April 23, 1885. One 
child died in infancy; a son and a daughter survive, Hon. David Marsh Kelly, 
of Boston, and Miss Sarah Marsh Kelly, of Haverhill; also, an adopted son, 
Samuel Marsh, of New York. 

Mr. Kelly died of psoriasis, at Haverhill, August 16, 1898, aged ninety 
years and eleven days. 



CLASS OF 1838. 

Charles Selden Sherman. 

Son of Josiah Sherman and Hannah Jones (and grandson of Rev. Josiah 
Sherman, of Woburn, brother of Roger Sherman); born in Albany, N. Y., 
April 26, 18 10; studied at Albany Academy and under Rev. Samuel Center, a 
private teacher; graduated at Yale College, 1835; studied in this Seminary, 
1835-38 (but winter term of 1837-38 in Yale Divinity School, and licensed to 
preach by "The Association of the Western District of New Haven County, 
Nath'l W. Taylor, Moderator," December 6, 1837) ; graduated here September 
5, 1838, his Commencement address being on " Love to Christ the Christian's 
Ruling Passion." He was ordained as foreign missionary, at Woburn, Mass., 
November 30, 1838 (at the same time with Leander Thompson, his classmate 
and lifelong friend), but supplied the church at Pepperell, Mass., until April, 
1839; under commission of the American Board sailed from Boston for 
Smyrna, July 17, 1839, and arrived at Jerusalem, October 24, laboring there 
until May, 1842. Compelled by ill health to return to the United States, he 
preached at Naugatuck, Ct., 1843-44; was pastor of the First Congregational 
Church, New Britain, Ct., 1845-49; at Naugatuck, Ct., for twenty years, 1849- 
69; agent of the Systematic Beneficence Society of Connecticut, resid.ng at 



33 2 

Xaugatuck, 1869-70; pastor of Presbyterian Church in Nassau, N. Y., 1870-75; 
resided at Nassau, without charge (except supply of Lutheran Church at East 
Schodack, N. Y., 1877-78), 1875-84; resided at Manchester Green, Ct., from 
1SS4 until his death. 

His only publication was a Historical Discourse at the Centennial of the 
Congregational Church, Naugatuck, Ct., 1881. Rev. George Sherman Mills, of 
Belfast, Me. (Class of 1895), a grandson of Mr. Sherman, sends the following 
tribute: " My own relation with him was a peculiarly affectionate and sympa- 
thetic one. As a boy I revered him ; in later years his character has been a 
chief molding influence in my life. I have no more precious memories than of 
hours spent with him in conversation upon sacred things. To sit at his feet 
and listen gave comfort and inspiration. To visit him for a little meant a 
return to work in college or seminary with a quieter spirit and stronger resolu- 
tion — with a new birth of faith and hope in the soul. Two traits, it seems to 
me, accounted in large measure for my grandfather's influence over all who 
knew him. He was a remarkably well-balanced man, devoid of any slightest 
twist or eccentricity. His character had symmetry and poise. He was strong 
on the side of the minor virtues. His spirituality was perfectly natural — but 
he was spiritual. And this was the other chief characteristic — his vivid sense 
of the invisible world, his certainty of conviction regarding Christ and the life 
to come. He had vision, and walked in the light of it every day. Nothing 
ever disturbed the serenity of his faith. Add to this an openness towards new 
truth, a willingness to change his mind on sufficient evidence, a tolerant, pro- 
gressive spirit, and you have his capacity for influence. Although not a great 
man in the accepted sense, his goodness was with great power." 

Mr. Sherman married, June II, 1839, Martha Esther Williams, of New 
Haven, Ct., daughter of Cyrus Williams and Martha Wheeler. She died July 
2, 1846. He married, second, July I, 1847, Esther Woodbridge Pitkin, of Man- 
chester, Ct., daughter of Uea. Horace Pitkin and Emily Woodbridge. She 
died July 11, 1893. Two sons died in childhood; one daughter, the wife of 
Rev. George A. Mills, died in 1890 ; one son resides in New York City, and a 
son and a daughter in Manchester. 

Mr. Sherman died of old age and exhaustion, at Manchester Green, Ct., 
January 3, 1899, aged eighty-eight years, eight months, and eight days. 

GLASS OF 1839. 

Parker Pillsbury. {Non- graduate.) 

Son of Dea. Oliver Pillsbury and Anna Smith; born in Hamilton, Mass., 
September 22, 1809; the family removed to Henniker, N. H., in his infancy; 
he attended district schools there in winter; in Lynn, Mass., 1829-32, engaged 
in driving express wagon between Lynn and Boston ; returned to the Henniker 
farm; was commander of the West Militia Company in Henniker ; studied in 
Gilmanton (N. H.) Theological Seminary, 1835-38; and in this Seminary for 
part of the year, 1838-39 (in the Senior Class) ; was licensed to preach by the 
Suffolk North Association, April 23, 1838, meeting at the house of Rev. Seth 
Bliss, Boston ; preached at Loudon, N. H., 1839-40. At this point he left both 
the ministry and the church and engaged in the anti-slavery movement, asso- 
ciating himself with the most radical agitators in that reform, and as editor and 



333 

orator continuing in it, with terrible earnestness, until his own frequent predic- 
tion that slavery would "go down in blood" was finally fulfilled in i86< 
He was an agent of the American Anti-Slavery Society; edited for a time the 
Herald of Freedom at Concord, N. H., and later the National Anti-Slavery 
Standard in New York. In 1853 he visited England, and spent two years and 
a half there delivering lectures and giving " parlor talks." After the'abolition 
of slavery he was an advocate of woman's suffrage and kindred reforms, editing 
for two years, in connection with Mrs. Stanton and Miss Anthony, the Revolu- 
tion in New York, and serving as lay preacher of different free religious socie- 
ties in the West. He published in 1883 a reminiscent volume, Acts of the Anti- 
Slavery Apostles. Ecclesiastical and Civil Authority, Things New arid Old, 
Popular Religion and What Shall be Instead, God and the Federal Constitution, 
and many other pamphlets, had been previously printed. His residence from 
1840 was at Concord, N. H.,with the exception of two or three years at Milford, 
N. H., previous to 1847. As characterization of the fiery and effective eloquence 
of our former student, quotation may be made from Lowell's poem, Letter from 
Boston, written to the Pennsylvania Freeman in 1846, in description of an anti- 
slavery convention in Faneuil Hall : 

Beyond, a crater in each eye, 

Sways brown, broad-shouldered Pillsbury, 

Who tears up words like trees by the roots ; 

A Theseus in stout cowhide boots, 

The wager of eternal war 

Against that loathsome Minotaur, 

To whom we sacrifice each year 

The best blood of our Athens here. 

A terrible denouncer he ; 

Old Sinai burns unquenchably 

Upon his lips ; he well might be a 

Hot-blazing soul from fierce Judea, 

Habakkuk, Ezra, or Hosea. 

As explaining why Mr. Pillsbury is registered as a " non-graduate "student, 
it maybe well, now that that historic conflict is in the distant past and both sides 
of it are well understood, to preserve a part of his own letter, written to the com- 
piler of the General Catalogue of 1880: "The catalogue of 1838-39 has my 
humble name in its Senior Class. A little before the close of the winter term I 
left it for the higher, holier ministry of preaching ' deliverance to the captives ' 
— our millions of American captives, not prisoners, but 'chattel slaves.' Ando- 
ver at that time was educating slaveholders and the sons of slaveholders to the 
Christian ministry. Dr. Woods strongly urged us of the Senior Class to go into 
Missouri, a slave State, and read us a most powerful appeal from that State to 
come at once after graduation. . . . You see what gospel my class must 
have carried to the slaveholders and slave- breeders of Missouri, had we accepted 
the proposal of Dr. Bullard, so earnestly seconded by our venerable professor, 
Dr. Woods. ... I was the first who entered [at Gilmanton], and was 
there several weeks alone. One professor, Rev. Heman Rood, and myself 
composed ' Gilmanton Theological Seminary,' when as such it was first intro- 
duced by the newspapers to a wondering world. I was licensed to preach by 
the Suffolk North Association in the spring of 1838. And though happily 
never ordained, my license was withdrawn or revoked by the same august 



334 

authority, a year or two afterwards [February 23, 1841, on complaint of the 
Hopkinton (N. H.) Association], my crime being contumacy. But having 
obtained help from God, I have lived in all good conscience to this day, and 
have perhaps preached to more people by pulpit, platform, and editorial chair 
than have any, if not all, my Gilmanton classmates ; and have seen slavery 
abolished, in spite of Andover and Professor Stuart, some growth in the tem- 
perance reform, and woman suffrage already marching on from conquering to 
conquer, completely, in due time." 

Rev. Franklin D. Ayer, D.D. (Class of 1859), for thirty years pastor in 
Concord, N. H., writes: "Parker Pillsbury came of a strong, clear-minded 
stock. There was in him the heroism born of quick sympathies, strong will, 
and absolute sincerity. He was easily a reformer and had the courage of a real 
iconoclast. His best mettle was shown in battle. When he had formed an 
opinion he had great confidence in it. When he set a goal he never wavered, 
but struck for the end with all his power of word and deed, of logic and sar- 
casm. He never turned out for anything or anybody that opposed his convic- 
tions. His convictions were so clear and certain to himself that he could not 
understand how any one else could think otherwise. He therefore failed to 
give full justice to the opinions of those who differed from him, and the edge 
of his sarcasm was sometimes so sharp that it cut beyond the opinion and 
reached the man who held it. His earnestness, sincerity, and self-sacrifice made 
him impatient of delay, sometimes unwise in methods and unkind in words, and 
to throw away some of the very helps that he and the cause he made his own 
needed. He so hated slavery that he could not tolerate any seeming excuse or 
hesitancy. He assailed the church, for he thought her fearful and halting; the 
ministry, for he regarded it servile and afraid ; he nearly surrendered the Bible 
itself, because the men who believed it were not more outspoken in denouncing 
human bondage. When the great conflict had passed in which he had been so 
active and efficient, his peculiar mission seemed ended. He was the man for 
the real fray, and seemed to be laid aside when the issue was won. No one 
who knew him could doubt the depth and sincerity of his sympathy, the purity 
of his motives, his forgetfulness of fame and power and money for himself, his 
constant devotion to the cause of the oppressed, and his self-sacrifice for the 
weal of the unfortunate." 

Mr. Pillsbury was married, January 1, 1840, to Sarah Hall Sargent, of Con- 
cord, N. H., daughter of Dr. John L. Sargent and Sally Wilkins. She died 
March 8, 1898. They had one daughter, Mrs. Helen B. P. Cogswell, of Concord. 

Mr. Pillsbury died of old age, at Concord, N. H., July 7, 1898, aged eighty- 
eight years, nine months, and fifteen days. 

GLASS OF 1840. 

Worcester Willey. 

Son of Darius Willey and Mary Pulsifer; born at Campton, N. H., Sep- 
tember 1, 1808; fitted at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H., Rochester 
(N. H.) Academy, and Phillips Exeter Academy; graduated at Williams Col- 
lege, 1835 ; studied in this Seminary, 1835-36, and 1838-40, having charge dur- 
ing the intervening years of Ashby (Mass.) Academy; licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association, meeting with Rev. Samuel C. Jackson, Andover, April 



335 

i 3 , 1840; graduated September 2, 1840, speaking upon "The Influence of Mis- 
sions upon the Pulpit." He was acting pastor at South Wellfleet, Mass., 1840- 
41 ; principal of Holmes Plymouth (N. H.) Academy, 1841-43; acting pastor at 
Hardwick, Vt., 1843-44; ordained as missionary at Campton, N. H., October 3, 
1844; and labored among the Cherokees — at Dwight Station in the Indian 
Territory — with the exception of two visits to New England, 1852-55, and 
1859-60 — until the discontinuance of the mission by the American Board in i860. 
He remained in the Territory until 1870, and afterwards lived, without charge, 
at Andover, Mass., but visited his old field in the Cherokee country, 1891-92. 

Mr. Willey came of a sturdy Puritan family, which emigrated from Con- 
necticut to New Hampshire before the Revolution, and struggled with the hard- 
ships and privations of pioneer life in the wilderness. The ten children all 
became earnest Christians in youth, all united with the church, and all belonged 
to the church choir. Their intense love of music is shown in the incident 
related of the subject of this sketch, that when at rare intervals some white man, 
fond of Christian singing, came to the missionary station in the Cherokee 
Nation, Mr. Willey would sit up with him nearly the whole night, singing 
hymns and playing on the bass viol. The five sons all prepared for the minis- 
try, one of them dying while at Williams College. The youngest and last sur- 
vivor of the family is Rev. Samuel Hopkins Willey, D.D., of San Francisco. 
Mr. Willey was one of the original members, in 1834, of the college church at 
Williamstown, and retained his relationship with it for sixty-one years, trans- 
ferring it to the Free Church at Andover in 1895, on his eighty-seventh birth- 
day. 

Rev. Charles C. Torrey, of Harvard, Mass. (Class of 1854), who was a mis- 
sionary among the Cherokees for several years, writes : " Brother Willey had 
the courage of his convictions beyond any man I ever knew. What he deemed 
right he would follow to the death, as evinced by his remaining at Dwight dur- 
ing the civil war, although the mission had been closed and the other missiona- 
ries had returned. He endured untold hardships and sufferings, both in his 
own person and in his family, obliged to be in hiding much of the time, living 
like the worthies of old, in dens and caves of the earth, twice made prisoner by 
the rebels, and many times narrowly escaping death. He was a man of great 
physical force and endurance, and though frequently robbed and spoiled, was 
enabled at length to make his escape to the protection of government troops at 
Fort Gibson. The tact, courage, and sufferings of his daughter Adaline, and 
her care for her younger sisters, were stranger than fiction and beyond all 
praise. As a missionary Mr. Willey was enthusiastic and optimistic to the last 
degree. But he had not the material to work with, and did not sufficiently dis- 
count the obstacles which opposed his labors. He was by no means a student 
and not an impressive preacher, but he performed much manual labor, and 
endeared himself to many of his people by his sympathy and help." 

Rev. James D. Butler, LL.D., of Madison, Wis., the last survivor of the 
Class of 1840, sends this reminiscence, comparing Mr. Willey with the gifted 
and lamented William B. Homer: "Worcester Willey, the last of my class- 
mates to die, stood in a marked contrast to Homer, who was first to enter the 
cloud. Homer was the youngest, Willey the oldest; the one was alert in mind 
and body, the other somewhat heavy; the one well to do, the other poor; the 
former well prepared, the latter ill prepared for our curriculum. In criticising 



336 

sermons in the class room all praise was forbidden, as it was supposed that the 
world itself could not contain the laudations that would be spoken. The merri- 
ment of free criticism was heartily enjoyed, and not least by Homer — but by 
Willey never. When I chanced to say that between one thing and another 
there was 'a great gulf fixed,' he rebuked me sharply for such irreverent tri- 
fling with Holy Writ. Indian chiefs, when I have encountered them among 
their tribes, have reminded me of his exceeding gravity, and so proved to my 
mind his fitness to be a missionary to that fated race, those ' prisoners of 
despair.' " 

Professor Park recalls vividly one incident of the Seminary Commence- 
ment, though nearly sixty years ago, as showing Mr. Willey's tender heart and 
strong emotions. The " Hymn of the Parting Class " was one written by Dr. 
Nehemiah Adams for his own class (1829), and contained this among other 
stanzas : 

Scenes of love and sacred friendship, 
We will bid you all farewell ; 

O'er the earth's wide face we wander, 
News of Jesus' love to tell — 

We forever 

Now must part, and say, Farewell. 

Willey, although so fond of singing, broke down and wept like a child. 

Mr. Willey was married, October 18, 1844, to Mary Ann Frye, of Andover, 
Mass., daughter of Samuel Frye and Mary Richardson. She died at D wight, 
September 23, 1850. He married, second, Anna Sears Chase, of South Den- 
nis. Mass., daughter of Sears Chase and Ann Knowles. She died at Dwight, 
January 27, 1862. Two daughters died in childhood in the Indian Territory. 
Adaline L. Willey died while a teacher in the Creek Nation, in 1890. A son 
lives at Fort Gibson, I. T., and three married daughters live respectively in 
New Mexico, Missouri, and New Hampshire. 

Mr. Willey died of cystitis, at Andover, Mass., March 31, 1899, aged ninety 
years and seven months. 

CLASS OF 1842. 

Samuel Colcord Bartlett, D.D., LL.D. 

Son of Samuel Colcord Bartlett and Eleanor Pettengill ; born in Salisbury, 
N. H., November 25, 1817 ; studied at Salisbury Academy and completed his 
preparation for college at Pinkerton Academy, Derry, N. H. ; graduated at 
Dartmouth College, 1836; was principal of the Caledonia County Grammar 
School, Peacham, Vt., 1836-38; and tutor in mathematics, Dartmouth College, 
J S38-39; took the full course in this Seminary, 1839-42, his address at Com- 
mencement, Sept. 7, 1842, being upon "The Exclusion of Philosophy from 
Christianity." He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, meeting 
with Dr. Justin Edwards, Andover, April 12, 1842; and was ordained pastor of 
the church at Monson, Mass., August 2, 1843. He remained there three years; 
was Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Rhetoric, Western Reserve Col- 
lege, Hudson, 0., 1846-52; pastor of Franklin Street Church, Manchester, 
N. H., 1852-57; pastor of New England Church, Chicago, 111., 1857-59; Pro- 
fessor of Biblical Literature, Chicago Theological Seminary, 1858-77; president 



337 
of Dartmowth College, 1877-92, and lectnrer «i "The KKe and i 

He received the degree of Doctor of Drvhniy fro. Dartmowth C ^ ™ 




" ' " ' : ' : • ' - - '-:* ---- - -: :: ^ H- ; L ._-, ; : III 

of Agriculture, 1879-92. He was a c m put ale member of the A—^^ Board 

189J aad ■ember of several national councils. Dr. Bardetfs amtrilnnions to 
•-----*- - - • - -- - - " ...,.: --.-t -_~t. -._;. H - -V'_~'..V. 

tart folnes were: Steies j tie MTustom *f tie Americum Bemrd ; Ufemmd 
Demtk EUrmal; Future Pumiskment ; Frem Egypt to Pmlestime ; Simrus J His- 
tory in the PentolemcA ; VermcuJ ef the ffrrmtruet. Besides a roLome of pub- 
lished A inner ary Addresses, be also published mm orations at the 
or the battle of Beaaiagton, 1877, at the two handi il aad fiftieth 
of Xewburyport, iSS^ aad at the drrih a iion of a 
Concord, X. H-, 18 16. He was one of the editors of the Cmmgn^timmmt t f^ ld, 
Chicago, and wrote many articles for the NmU Amenemu Review. BMtothe^m 
Smera, Aew Eugiauder, Princeton Review, Ferum, and ff*mul*tu*I Memtkly, 
as weO as for the weekly press. His last writtea work was for the Dmrtmtoutk 
Utermrj Mewtmly 00 tae " Early Life of Daniel Webster." 

Rer. F. W. Fsk. D.D., LL D_ pieshtent of Chicago Theological -^^■■.. j 
(Cla« ;:' :• :; . *.:t~ of Dr. Bstdetfi rimniilms wMh that iailnmhm He 
entered on the daties of his p r ofrwMWi h ip at the opening of the Seminary, Octo- 

of instruction dnrin g nineteen years, until 1S77. Throughout all those early 
yean of the Seminary, when its nnaaciai resources were scanty, its V^fraT 
few, and only three of its chairs of instrnctions filed, Pi ofa s sm Bartktt was a 
tower of strength to the yowng anthnrion He came to it with a repatation of 
wide and exact s cholarship, especially in the sacred Scriptures, and he entered 
on his daties as * Professor of Sacred literature,' with am ralhniij«i that made 
him an attractive aad inspiring teacher. Giving nvstrarfhm m the Ikerarure aad 
: -.-y- 1: : : : : -. \ : T:-:i .--_: l - : :- '.-z~ : r :i _r 1: :.-. ,1 :i - : -. 

t . .■-. - .. .: - - , . •■- - .- : - 1 .!.--!.: His p.;:.; i-:;: 11? ti- z 
relied sa his jadgmeat, aad trasted his ««mrla*inas He labored streaaoasly to 

:r_-i: .-: i- i i: - rti.:;: i : t. ^ ; : _z.-t :: i" 1 ii= s-trr: :« :~ :=.z •:.-_*" 
: _-. , ■-: 1 ■=■: Hr i, t^: -r: :: :t 1 ~i :: :t: :m : : _ - 
m faith ia the great verities of C halijauy , and a stanch i lrfrmlff 

of what he befieved to be the trath. Chicago Theological Seanaary wiD not 

~- - : -- mr.z :tr ~-i- '.:: .11 z-.i: 1 >-:::t ::ti:- 7 ?:::t^:r :i::r " 
Fr m the faneral address of President Wiffiam J. Tacker, D.D., LLD. 
of 1866), in the college charch at Haaover, the following extracts 
made: "Id© not know of a sabject which wnght cmha the ; 
the mtrres: of a man of thowght, m :: aftaws, ThJch 
or with which his mind did not make mteffigeat contact. It 
task for a man to keep himsal iatercsted, iafntmed, 



338 

past eighty years, to follow with due appreciation the enlargements of science, 
the struggle of reform, the spread of Christianity. Dr. Bartlett kept abreast of 
the world to the last. Within three hours of his death he called for the day's 
report of the negotiations with Spain. His scholarship covered a wide range, 
but wherever it went it was scholarship. He was a theologian, but his theology 
was not an abstraction. It sent him out into the field to identify him with the 
moral reforms of his time, anti- slavery, temperance, and civic purity. . . . Dr. 
Bartlett was to me an optimist, a thorough-going and radical optimist. I think 
that I do not go too far when I say that he was a man of s